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BUSINESS
March 21, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Rail Investment to Be Pared by a Third: The government has cut its planned investment in railway construction this year to $3.3 billion, the official China Daily reported. China had originally planned to invest $4.8 billion to ease transport bottlenecks, the newspaper said. No reason was given for the cutback. In January, China moved to curtail investment in new construction projects to curb inflation, but it said infrastructure projects would not be affected.
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NEWS
December 6, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
At least 27 people have been killed and nine badly injured by trains on the new Beijing-Hong Kong railroad in the three months since it opened Sept. 1, the People's Daily in Shanghai reported. A total of 49 accidents occurred during that period in the eastern province of Jiangxi. The statistics cover only Jiangxi and do not include accidents in other areas along the route. The newspaper said most of the victims were people living along the route who were hit as they crossed the tracks.
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NEWS
December 6, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
At least 27 people have been killed and nine badly injured by trains on the new Beijing-Hong Kong railroad in the three months since it opened Sept. 1, the People's Daily in Shanghai reported. A total of 49 accidents occurred during that period in the eastern province of Jiangxi. The statistics cover only Jiangxi and do not include accidents in other areas along the route. The newspaper said most of the victims were people living along the route who were hit as they crossed the tracks.
NEWS
September 1, 1996 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
During the day, the new glass-and-chrome Bank of China building here is a 25-story symbol of respectability befitting this city's designation as an emerging railway center. But at night, the uniformed bank guards and the bustling business people retreat. Sidewalk karaoke bars, China's forlorn open-air honky-tonks, crank up the off-key ballads. Aggressive prostitutes ply the pavement.
NEWS
August 27, 1994 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Shi Yanjun moved his business from Guangzhou to this primitive border trading post on the rugged southern frontier to make his fortune selling clocks, watches and satellite television dishes to Vietnamese. His stall, full of sophisticated electronics and television monitors, is flanked by other stores selling sacks of garlic, bicycle parts, bootleg Vietnamese music cassettes and veterinary hog syringes.
NEWS
October 23, 1989 | Reuters
China's hard-line leaders have built secret rail tunnels under Beijing that could be used in crushing resurgent protests or to enable officials to flee in a crisis, according to a program to be broadcast today. A former Chinese civil servant, who fled to Hong Kong after troops crushed pro-democracy demonstrations in June, told the British "World in Action" television program that the tunnels link leaders' homes, government buildings, the central bank and an army base.
NEWS
September 1, 1996 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
During the day, the new glass-and-chrome Bank of China building here is a 25-story symbol of respectability befitting this city's designation as an emerging railway center. But at night, the uniformed bank guards and the bustling business people retreat. Sidewalk karaoke bars, China's forlorn open-air honky-tonks, crank up the off-key ballads. Aggressive prostitutes ply the pavement.
BUSINESS
May 24, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Archibald Cox Jr. Resigns From Tiger: The former president and chief executive of First Boston Corp. resigned after a six-month stint at Tiger Management Corp. after he was unable to raise $1 billion for a new fund designed to invest directly in industrial projects such as power plants, roads and railroads in China and Southeast Asia. Cox was unavailable for comment.
NEWS
August 27, 1994 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Shi Yanjun moved his business from Guangzhou to this primitive border trading post on the rugged southern frontier to make his fortune selling clocks, watches and satellite television dishes to Vietnamese. His stall, full of sophisticated electronics and television monitors, is flanked by other stores selling sacks of garlic, bicycle parts, bootleg Vietnamese music cassettes and veterinary hog syringes.
BUSINESS
March 21, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Rail Investment to Be Pared by a Third: The government has cut its planned investment in railway construction this year to $3.3 billion, the official China Daily reported. China had originally planned to invest $4.8 billion to ease transport bottlenecks, the newspaper said. No reason was given for the cutback. In January, China moved to curtail investment in new construction projects to curb inflation, but it said infrastructure projects would not be affected.
NEWS
October 23, 1989 | Reuters
China's hard-line leaders have built secret rail tunnels under Beijing that could be used in crushing resurgent protests or to enable officials to flee in a crisis, according to a program to be broadcast today. A former Chinese civil servant, who fled to Hong Kong after troops crushed pro-democracy demonstrations in June, told the British "World in Action" television program that the tunnels link leaders' homes, government buildings, the central bank and an army base.
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