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NEWS
November 29, 1996 | DAVID HALDANE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Carrying gloves and a police scanner, Rudy Sanchez walked gingerly into the darkness, glaring at the makeshift tent made of blankets near the railroad tracks. "We cleaned this place out 10 days ago and now they're back," he said, referring to the rickety encampment, uninhabited at the moment. "Now I'll have to call the state police again." Sanchez, 61, was a cop on the beat--a long, skinny beat.
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NEWS
April 15, 2013 | By Patt Morrison
A century and some change ago, more than a quarter of a million Chinese lived in California, most of them men and many of them veterans of the Gold Rush, and of the mining and railroad boom that followed. They were barred from owning property and from marrying, from doing much of anything save working, often at the skimpiest of wages and in the most squalid of conditions -- in life and in death, as the recent discovery of a neglected 19th century potter's field of Chinese workers' skeletal remains in Los Angeles attested.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 5, 1993 | BERKLEY HUDSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As a boom box played a scratchy recording of the hymn "Nearer My God to Thee," a chilly fog on Sunday morning enveloped about 350 people on a mountainside north of Pasadena. The music invoked the main song from a celebration that took place there, in the San Gabriel Mountains of the Angeles National Forest, exactly 100 years before. For on July 4, 1893, to the strains of an orchestra that ascended in a cable car into the clouds around Echo Mountain, the Mt. Lowe Scenic Railway officially opened.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 2000 | JUDY RAPHAEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
This weekend's fifth annual Spring Rail Festival in Fillmore offers an opportunity to celebrate the rich history of the charmingly revived old railroad town, once a major link between Northern and Southern California, which sits amid acres of orange groves along State Highway 126 between Ventura and Santa Clarita. "The railroad built this valley and put Ventura County on the map, by enabling the oil and citrus industries to flourish.
NEWS
September 10, 1989 | CHARLES HILLINGER, Times Staff Writer
The 56-year-old steam railroad locomotive rumbled along the steel rails through Pennsylvania's scenic Endless Mountains country at a 40-m.p.h. clip. His red bandanna flopping in the breeze, 61-year-old veteran engineer Bernie O'Brien sounded the train whistle. Fireman Seth Corwin, 53, shoveled coal into the glowing red firebox, and steam poured from the old iron horse as it chug, chug, chug, chug, chugged.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 5, 1994
"L.A. Scene" by Cecilia Rasmussen (March 28), on railroad stations in Los Angeles, is one of the best ever. As Metrolink expands and rails become even more important to 21st Century travel in the region, a look back is important. What Rasmussen did not chronicle was that Southern Pacific tracks on Alameda Street in front of Union Station have been removed. These rails connected the Los Angeles & San Pedro Railroad to the SP's River Station and yards on North Main and now have been severed.
NEWS
April 15, 2013 | By Patt Morrison
A century and some change ago, more than a quarter of a million Chinese lived in California, most of them men and many of them veterans of the Gold Rush, and of the mining and railroad boom that followed. They were barred from owning property and from marrying, from doing much of anything save working, often at the skimpiest of wages and in the most squalid of conditions -- in life and in death, as the recent discovery of a neglected 19th century potter's field of Chinese workers' skeletal remains in Los Angeles attested.
NEWS
May 1, 1986 | MARY BARBER, Times Staff Writer
When the Southwest Chief rumbles into Pasadena every morning at 7, a lone ticket agent, who often has just unlocked the station doors, doubles as baggage handler for a few passengers. At 8:36 every night, right after the train heads back for Chicago, the doors are locked.
TRAVEL
March 5, 2000 | TIMES STAFF AND WIRES
A bit of train history was up for sale last month when 23 of the original Orient Express carriages that ran between Paris and Istanbul before World War II were put on the market in Switzerland. Swiss travel operator Reiseburo Mittelthurgau, which bought the cars in 1993, said it had become too expensive to run its luxury train tours, which go to Moscow and Beijing and also make day trips from Switzerland. Those tours haven't been marketed in the U.S.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 2000 | JUDY RAPHAEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
This weekend's fifth annual Spring Rail Festival in Fillmore offers an opportunity to celebrate the rich history of the charmingly revived old railroad town, once a major link between Northern and Southern California, which sits amid acres of orange groves along State Highway 126 between Ventura and Santa Clarita. "The railroad built this valley and put Ventura County on the map, by enabling the oil and citrus industries to flourish.
TRAVEL
March 5, 2000 | TIMES STAFF AND WIRES
A bit of train history was up for sale last month when 23 of the original Orient Express carriages that ran between Paris and Istanbul before World War II were put on the market in Switzerland. Swiss travel operator Reiseburo Mittelthurgau, which bought the cars in 1993, said it had become too expensive to run its luxury train tours, which go to Moscow and Beijing and also make day trips from Switzerland. Those tours haven't been marketed in the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 1999 | RICHARD KAHLENBERG, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
From pipe fitters to engineers, women have done the same jobs as their male counterparts on the railroad in the last 100 years. Their contributions are captured in an exhibit and series of performances Saturday at Travel Town in Griffith Park. "She's Been Working On the Railroad," part of a citywide celebration of Women's History Month, features live musical and theatrical events from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.
TRAVEL
May 10, 1998 | KAREN BUCKLEY, Buckley is a freelance writer based in Indiana, Pa
At first glance, Ripley appeared just another pleasant old river town, a place to dine and shop for antiques in the colorful historic storefronts, or stroll along the banks of the Ohio River and take in the tree-shaded 19th century homes.
NEWS
November 29, 1996 | DAVID HALDANE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Carrying gloves and a police scanner, Rudy Sanchez walked gingerly into the darkness, glaring at the makeshift tent made of blankets near the railroad tracks. "We cleaned this place out 10 days ago and now they're back," he said, referring to the rickety encampment, uninhabited at the moment. "Now I'll have to call the state police again." Sanchez, 61, was a cop on the beat--a long, skinny beat.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 5, 1994
"L.A. Scene" by Cecilia Rasmussen (March 28), on railroad stations in Los Angeles, is one of the best ever. As Metrolink expands and rails become even more important to 21st Century travel in the region, a look back is important. What Rasmussen did not chronicle was that Southern Pacific tracks on Alameda Street in front of Union Station have been removed. These rails connected the Los Angeles & San Pedro Railroad to the SP's River Station and yards on North Main and now have been severed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 5, 1993 | BERKLEY HUDSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As a boom box played a scratchy recording of the hymn "Nearer My God to Thee," a chilly fog on Sunday morning enveloped about 350 people on a mountainside north of Pasadena. The music invoked the main song from a celebration that took place there, in the San Gabriel Mountains of the Angeles National Forest, exactly 100 years before. For on July 4, 1893, to the strains of an orchestra that ascended in a cable car into the clouds around Echo Mountain, the Mt. Lowe Scenic Railway officially opened.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 1999 | RICHARD KAHLENBERG, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
From pipe fitters to engineers, women have done the same jobs as their male counterparts on the railroad in the last 100 years. Their contributions are captured in an exhibit and series of performances Saturday at Travel Town in Griffith Park. "She's Been Working On the Railroad," part of a citywide celebration of Women's History Month, features live musical and theatrical events from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.
TRAVEL
May 10, 1998 | KAREN BUCKLEY, Buckley is a freelance writer based in Indiana, Pa
At first glance, Ripley appeared just another pleasant old river town, a place to dine and shop for antiques in the colorful historic storefronts, or stroll along the banks of the Ohio River and take in the tree-shaded 19th century homes.
NEWS
March 7, 1991 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Stephen Donaldson of Newport Beach was first exposed to "the romance of railroading" at 16, when he accompanied a friend on a train trip to Colorado and Wyoming in the '60s. His interest in railroad history continued to grow as an Orange Coast College student two years later when he persuaded his English professor to let him write an assigned theme paper about railroads, which interested him, rather than about literature, which didn't.
NEWS
September 10, 1989 | CHARLES HILLINGER, Times Staff Writer
The 56-year-old steam railroad locomotive rumbled along the steel rails through Pennsylvania's scenic Endless Mountains country at a 40-m.p.h. clip. His red bandanna flopping in the breeze, 61-year-old veteran engineer Bernie O'Brien sounded the train whistle. Fireman Seth Corwin, 53, shoveled coal into the glowing red firebox, and steam poured from the old iron horse as it chug, chug, chug, chug, chugged.
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