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NEWS
December 17, 2000 | VALERIE REITMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A blue-blooded Japanese railway has begun discriminating in favor of women. In a rare move, the Keio Teito Electric Railway Co. has set up special female-only train cars as a refuge this holiday season from Japan's notorious chikan, or "gropers," who squeeze more than just their way onto jampacked trains. But the policy hasn't gone down easy with some male commuters. They gripe that the segregation makes the rest of the train even more crowded for the male majority.
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NEWS
December 17, 2000 | VALERIE REITMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A blue-blooded Japanese railway has begun discriminating in favor of women. In a rare move, the Keio Teito Electric Railway Co. has set up special female-only train cars as a refuge this holiday season from Japan's notorious chikan, or "gropers," who squeeze more than just their way onto jampacked trains. But the policy hasn't gone down easy with some male commuters. They gripe that the segregation makes the rest of the train even more crowded for the male majority.
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NEWS
July 10, 1990 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Masaaki Tozawa, a 34-year-old office worker, is just your average Tokyo commuter. He rises with the roosters at 6:20 a.m. and is out the door by 7:03 to begin what seems to an outsider to be a torturous, 90 minute, three-train, mostly standing-room-only journey to his office just 15.5 miles away. It's another hour and a half coming home at night to the small apartment he shares with his wife and two small children in this quiet, clean, bedroom community northeast of the capital.
BUSINESS
April 1, 1987
The Japanese National Railways will end a 115-year history today and officially dissolve into nearly a dozen private companies. Japan already has taken major steps toward privatization by selling off the telephone, tobacco and salt monopolies. Despite its reputation for superb service and high technology, JNR has paid stricter attention to schedules than to balance sheets. Since 1964, the system has accumulated a debt of 25 trillion yen, or about $172 billion at current exchange rates.
NEWS
March 16, 1988 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, Times Staff Writer
A sleeper train broke down near the bottom of the Seikan Tunnel early Tuesday, stranding passengers only two days after the world's longest undersea tunnel was opened to rail traffic. The 33.4-mile tunnel, which links Japan's northernmost island of Hokkaido with the main island of Honshu, was inaugurated Sunday morning amid great hoopla. Transportation Minister Shintaro Ishihara hailed the tunnel as "a technological feat without parallel in the world . . . a myth come true."
NEWS
February 5, 1987 | From Reuters
A magnetically levitated train broke the speed record for manned runs Wednesday, reaching 249 m.p.h. on an experimental track, Japan National Railways said. A spokesman said the two-car MLU-001 with three crew members broke the record of 221 m.p.h. set by West Germany's Transrapid 06 in December, 1985. The record for unmanned magnetically levitated trains was set by an earlier prototype of the Japanese train, the ML500, in 1979 when it topped 321 m.p.h.
NEWS
July 10, 1990 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Masaaki Tozawa, a 34-year-old office worker, is just your average Tokyo commuter. He rises with the roosters at 6:20 a.m. and is out the door by 7:03 to begin what seems to an outsider to be a torturous, 90 minute, three-train, mostly standing-room-only journey to his office just 15.5 miles away. It's another hour and a half coming home at night to the small apartment he shares with his wife and two small children in this quiet, clean, bedroom community northeast of the capital.
BUSINESS
July 5, 1994 | From Associated Press
The Walton family of Wal-Mart renown ranked as the world's richest this year with a fortune totaling $23.6 billion, Forbes magazine reports. Japanese hotel and railroad magnate Yoshiaki Tsutsumi was the richest individual, according to the magazine's annual ranking of billionaires, released Monday. Taken together, the billionaires--both families and individuals--have become a less-exclusive group, with their ranks swelling by 47 to 358 from a year ago, the magazine says in its July 18 issue.
NEWS
March 16, 1988 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, Times Staff Writer
A sleeper train broke down near the bottom of the Seikan Tunnel early Tuesday, stranding passengers only two days after the world's longest undersea tunnel was opened to rail traffic. The 33.4-mile tunnel, which links Japan's northernmost island of Hokkaido with the main island of Honshu, was inaugurated Sunday morning amid great hoopla. Transportation Minister Shintaro Ishihara hailed the tunnel as "a technological feat without parallel in the world . . . a myth come true."
BUSINESS
April 1, 1987
The Japanese National Railways will end a 115-year history today and officially dissolve into nearly a dozen private companies. Japan already has taken major steps toward privatization by selling off the telephone, tobacco and salt monopolies. Despite its reputation for superb service and high technology, JNR has paid stricter attention to schedules than to balance sheets. Since 1964, the system has accumulated a debt of 25 trillion yen, or about $172 billion at current exchange rates.
NEWS
February 5, 1987 | From Reuters
A magnetically levitated train broke the speed record for manned runs Wednesday, reaching 249 m.p.h. on an experimental track, Japan National Railways said. A spokesman said the two-car MLU-001 with three crew members broke the record of 221 m.p.h. set by West Germany's Transrapid 06 in December, 1985. The record for unmanned magnetically levitated trains was set by an earlier prototype of the Japanese train, the ML500, in 1979 when it topped 321 m.p.h.
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