Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRailroads Mexico
IN THE NEWS

Railroads Mexico

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
August 29, 1997 | MARY BETH SHERIDAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gilberto Chontal, a 37-year railroad veteran, squints through the grimy window of a train huffing through Mexico's southern jungle. His eyes flicker over turn-of-the-century train stations, thatched-roof huts, peasants dozing in hammocks. But what he sees is something else. "Progress," murmurs the stocky ticket collector, envisioning the super-train that may be installed here, under a government plan to link Mexico's coasts in a corridor as efficient as the Panama Canal.
ARTICLES BY DATE
WORLD
October 25, 2007 | Hector Tobar, Times Staff Writer
A freight train once ran through this town near the Guatemalan border. It carried cattle feed, cement and steel. Every day, a hundred or more men and women jumped on its rattletrap cars and hitched a free ride northward. Few locals miss the train, which stopped operating in July. But for the Central American immigrants who pass through southern Mexico on a desperate, 1,200-mile odyssey to the United States, the line's closure is a disaster of epic proportions.
Advertisement
NEWS
December 26, 1987 | Associated Press
After air fares almost doubled in price because of inflation, Mexicans by the million have been taking the train to their favorite tourist spots to spend Christmas and the New Year. As a result, the government's National Railways monopoly reports train reservations have been booked solid through Jan. 4 between Mexico City and points on the Gulf Coast, the Pacific Coast beaches and northern and central points such as Guadalajara, Monterrey and Puebla.
NEWS
August 29, 1997 | MARY BETH SHERIDAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gilberto Chontal, a 37-year railroad veteran, squints through the grimy window of a train huffing through Mexico's southern jungle. His eyes flicker over turn-of-the-century train stations, thatched-roof huts, peasants dozing in hammocks. But what he sees is something else. "Progress," murmurs the stocky ticket collector, envisioning the super-train that may be installed here, under a government plan to link Mexico's coasts in a corridor as efficient as the Panama Canal.
BUSINESS
October 10, 1996 | MARY BETH SHERIDAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mexico's ambitious program to privatize its railroad system got off on the wrong track Wednesday. In what was the second recent setback for Mexico's plans to raise billions of dollars in a sell-off of public facilities, the government was forced to cancel a planned sale of rights to a northern railway line because the sole bidder didn't offer nearly enough money.
BUSINESS
February 6, 1995 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They might not want the whole Mexican railroad, which has some wretched stretches of track. But despite the peso crisis and Mexico's political turmoil, U.S. and foreign railroad companies will be standing in line when the government of Ernesto Zedillo begins offering rights to his country's history-rich rail system.
BUSINESS
February 12, 1996 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Korean conglomerates are interested in buying the Mexican port of Ensenada and helping build a railroad from there northeast to Tecate as part of a major expansion of their industrial presence in northern Baja California, Mexican officials say. Among the possibilities: a new Hyundai steel mill.
NEWS
November 12, 1992 | GREG JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Look past the goats, cattle and pigs that stray onto the lone railroad track that heads south into Mexico from this city's dusty railroad depot and you can see the impact that free trade portends for the United States and Mexico. Each weekday morning, U.S. and Mexican customs agents unlock a pair of worn padlocks on the rusted gate that blocks the aging track between San Ysidro and Tijuana.
NEWS
April 21, 1997 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was just after nightfall when Luis Hernandez Suarez, 18, left his family's shack on the side of Mt. Atitla. He scrambled up a quarter-mile of arid, unyielding land and joined several dozen men, women and children from this poor town at a remote mountaintop rail crossing. Their plan: to greet the 14521 Express as it lurched through the rugged mountains of Veracruz state toward Mexico City and to force the night freight to make an unscheduled stop.
WORLD
October 25, 2007 | Hector Tobar, Times Staff Writer
A freight train once ran through this town near the Guatemalan border. It carried cattle feed, cement and steel. Every day, a hundred or more men and women jumped on its rattletrap cars and hitched a free ride northward. Few locals miss the train, which stopped operating in July. But for the Central American immigrants who pass through southern Mexico on a desperate, 1,200-mile odyssey to the United States, the line's closure is a disaster of epic proportions.
NEWS
April 21, 1997 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was just after nightfall when Luis Hernandez Suarez, 18, left his family's shack on the side of Mt. Atitla. He scrambled up a quarter-mile of arid, unyielding land and joined several dozen men, women and children from this poor town at a remote mountaintop rail crossing. Their plan: to greet the 14521 Express as it lurched through the rugged mountains of Veracruz state toward Mexico City and to force the night freight to make an unscheduled stop.
BUSINESS
October 10, 1996 | MARY BETH SHERIDAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mexico's ambitious program to privatize its railroad system got off on the wrong track Wednesday. In what was the second recent setback for Mexico's plans to raise billions of dollars in a sell-off of public facilities, the government was forced to cancel a planned sale of rights to a northern railway line because the sole bidder didn't offer nearly enough money.
BUSINESS
February 12, 1996 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Korean conglomerates are interested in buying the Mexican port of Ensenada and helping build a railroad from there northeast to Tecate as part of a major expansion of their industrial presence in northern Baja California, Mexican officials say. Among the possibilities: a new Hyundai steel mill.
BUSINESS
February 6, 1995 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They might not want the whole Mexican railroad, which has some wretched stretches of track. But despite the peso crisis and Mexico's political turmoil, U.S. and foreign railroad companies will be standing in line when the government of Ernesto Zedillo begins offering rights to his country's history-rich rail system.
NEWS
November 12, 1992 | GREG JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Look past the goats, cattle and pigs that stray onto the lone railroad track that heads south into Mexico from this city's dusty railroad depot and you can see the impact that free trade portends for the United States and Mexico. Each weekday morning, U.S. and Mexican customs agents unlock a pair of worn padlocks on the rusted gate that blocks the aging track between San Ysidro and Tijuana.
NEWS
December 26, 1987 | Associated Press
After air fares almost doubled in price because of inflation, Mexicans by the million have been taking the train to their favorite tourist spots to spend Christmas and the New Year. As a result, the government's National Railways monopoly reports train reservations have been booked solid through Jan. 4 between Mexico City and points on the Gulf Coast, the Pacific Coast beaches and northern and central points such as Guadalajara, Monterrey and Puebla.
BUSINESS
January 4, 2010 | By Ronald D. White
Southern California's twin ports make up the nation's biggest cargo container hub -- and they're launching an ambitious campaign to stay that way as they navigate a weak economic recovery and increasing competition from foreign and domestic harbors. The ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach are aggressively advertising and giving customers discounts at a time when they and most other U.S. ports are wrapping up their worst ever year-over-year decline in shipping business. In 2009, the two ports moved about 2.5 million fewer containers than the year before, the equivalent of shutting down the country's fourth-busiest seaport -- Savannah, Ga. -- for the entire year.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|