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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 1990 | LEN HALL
About 15 minutes before the scheduled departure of the 6:40 a.m. Amtrak train, commuter Robert Ross leaves his San Juan Capistrano home for the depot. Ross lives only about five minutes away, but he starts early to get one of the 131 parking spaces in the Franciscan Plaza next to the historic depot. "I always wonder what happens to No. 132," Ross said. As co-chairman of the Amtrak Commuters Assn.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 2001 | MONTE MORIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
County transportation officials tabled the selection of a preferred route for the $2.3-billion CenterLine Project on Monday, as support for the proposed commuter rail system appeared to be eroding in cities around the county. In a key final vote, Anaheim is scheduled to decide tonight whether the planned 30-mile rail line should pass through the municipality.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 14, 1993 | SHELBY GRAD
Motorists can expect traffic snarls along Culver Drive beginning next Tuesday, when workers start building a $15.7-million railroad underpass. The number of lanes on Culver Drive will be reduced from six to four during the two-year construction job. City officials suggest that motorists use Jeffrey Road or Jamboree Road instead of Culver. They are discouraging drivers from using smaller streets such as Harvard and Yale avenues.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 11, 2000 | MONTE MORIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For too many years, officials say, motorists have endured one of the commuting world's most hated phenomena--freight trains of seemingly infinite length chugging dolefully along, clogging miles of intersections in north Orange County. The logjams may someday disappear from the streets of Placentia and neighboring cities as Orange County transportation officials pursue an ambitious plan to route rail traffic beneath intersections along a 5-mile, 40-foot deep trench. Part of a larger $1.
NEWS
November 24, 1989 | JOHN M. GLIONNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Train conductor Joseph Byrd glanced anxiously at his pocket watch and scanned the suddenly deserted rail platform at Union Station in Los Angeles. "All aboard!" he yelled to no one in particular. Then he produced a walkie-talkie from the pocket of his blue suit coat and stepped onto the San Diego-bound passenger train. "I'm ready," he barked to the engineer. On board, the train's bar car was already doing a brisk business.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 13, 1994 | JEFFREY A. PERLMAN, TIMES URBAN AFFAIRS WRITER
Some freeway commuters dream of boarding a sleek, futuristic vehicle much like Disneyland's monorail. But that vision of high-tech trains sliding past crammed roads holds no promise for Jack Mallinckrodt. Mallinckrodt wants more streets, more ramps, more freeways. He wants to drive. A semi-retired radio electronics engineer, Mallinckrodt will be joined by a cadre of county residents at Monday's Orange County Transportation Authority board meeting.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 15, 1992
After years of complaints from residents about bone-rattling railroad crossings, Southern Pacific Transportation Co. has agreed to rubberize three crossings if the city pays for the materials, city officials said. "The ridability is murder," said City Engineer Bob Eichblatt, describing the plank-and-asphalt crossings at McFadden, Edinger and Heil avenues. The thick rubber mats used in rubberized crossings provide a much smoother ride and can last up to 20 years, he said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 1990 | JEFFREY A. PERLMAN and LISA MASCARO
An Anaheim engineering and consulting firm has been selected by the California-Nevada Super Speed Train Commission as one of five companies that will evaluate bids for building and operating a 300-m.p.h. rail system between Las Vegas and Anaheim. Willdan Associates has been selected, along with corporations from Southern California, Nevada, Colorado and Canada. Proposals to privately build and operate the train system are expected from Bechtel International of San Francisco, Morrison-Knudsen Co.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 13, 1990 | LEN HALL
Orange County Transportation Commission officials have learned at least one lesson when it comes to dealing with Amtrak commuters: Don't mess with the train schedules. Fifteen minutes one way or another can make or break a commute for someone who depends on the Los Angeles bus system for another leg of the daily journey. Just ask Lorrie Hutton.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 12, 1990 | LISA MASCARO
While an entourage of elected officials and business people are in Europe this week surveying potential trains for the Anaheim-Las Vegas line, financing to launch the project has begun. The Anaheim City Council recently voted to allocate $200,000 to help finance the search for a public contractor. In Nevada, the city of Las Vegas, the Convention/Visitors Authority and Clark County each donated $270,000 to the project, and the state chipped in $120,000.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 1999 | Crystal Carreon, (714) 966-7835
City Council members on Tuesday unanimously approved the $250-million railroad lowering option for the 4.2 miles of tracks along the Orangethorpe Avenue corridor. Lowering the tracks eliminates the need to condemn businesses and homes to build overpasses or underpasses, will decrease noise pollution and improve safety, city officials said. The Orange County Transit Authority had earlier recommended standard grade separations.
NEWS
November 29, 1996 | DAVID HALDANE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Carrying gloves and a police scanner, Rudy Sanchez walked gingerly into the darkness, glaring at the makeshift tent made of blankets near the railroad tracks. "We cleaned this place out 10 days ago and now they're back," he said, referring to the rickety encampment, uninhabited at the moment. "Now I'll have to call the state police again." Sanchez, 61, was a cop on the beat--a long, skinny beat.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 29, 1996 | DAVID HALDANE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rudy Sanchez was irritated. Carrying his gloves and a police scanner, he walked gingerly into the darkness, glaring at the makeshift tent made of blankets near the railroad tracks. "We cleaned this place out 10 days ago, and now they're back," he said, referring to the rickety encampment uninhabited at the moment. "Now I'll have to call the state police again." Sanchez, 61, is a cop on the beat--a long, skinny beat.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 1, 1995 | JULIE FATE SULLIVAN
To try to prevent beach-goers from crossing the railroad tracks at illegal access points, the city will begin installation of new high-security fencing in the Pier Bowl area. The City Council is scheduled to award a $40,000 contract tonight to Safeguards Technology Inc. of Hackensack, N.J., to remove the 15-year-old chain-link fence and replace it with a steel security fence running from the San Clemente Pier to the T Street Beach.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 6, 1995 | TOM RAGAN
Faced with an increasing amount of rail traffic, the cities of Yorba Linda, Placentia, Anaheim and Fullerton have commissioned a $252,000 study of how to cope with the problem. Freight trains are passing through North County with more frequency these days, city officials said, and that traffic is projected to increase, according to Santa Fe Railway. City officials say they are particularly concerned that trains will block emergency vehicles traveling on Orangethorpe Avenue.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 13, 1994 | GREG HERNANDEZ
After a testy debate with angry residents, the City Council this week approved a plan to study a nagging train noise problem in a residential community near Anaheim Stadium. Residents who live near the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railway tracks complained that having the city study the problem before acting means it will take too long to abate the noise, which they said has become unbearable since a second railway line opened in January.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 1990 | JEFFREY A. PERLMAN, TIMES URBAN AFFAIRS WRITER
Construction of a long-awaited, half-mile airport monorail probably will begin several months behind schedule in July and will have to be retrofitted to the new John Wayne Airport passenger terminal, officials said Monday. Last week airport officials complained that they had not heard for three months from McDonnell Douglas Realty Co., which has agreed to pay for the $4-million monorail, as the airport construction progressed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 24, 1994 | JEFFREY A. PERLMAN, TIMES URBAN AFFAIRS WRITER
By better than a 3-to-1 margin, Orange County voters want to spend tax money on a proposed Fullerton-to-Irvine urban rail line, a new survey shows. But support drops to about 50% when they learn the cost would be $2.1 billion. The telephone survey asked 600 registered voters if they back the plans for a 28-mile train route, which would include stops near Disneyland in Anaheim and South Coast Plaza in Costa Mesa. The survey of 600 registered voters was conducted from Feb. 26 to March 6 by J.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 13, 1994 | JEFFREY A. PERLMAN, TIMES URBAN AFFAIRS WRITER
Some freeway commuters dream of boarding a sleek, futuristic vehicle much like Disneyland's monorail. But that vision of high-tech trains sliding past crammed roads holds no promise for Jack Mallinckrodt. Mallinckrodt wants more streets, more ramps, more freeways. He wants to drive. A semi-retired radio electronics engineer, Mallinckrodt will be joined by a cadre of county residents at Monday's Orange County Transportation Authority board meeting.
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