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NEWS
July 4, 1998 | Reuters
Unpaid Russian miners blocked the strategic Trans-Siberian railway line for three hours on Friday before being removed by police, a union official said. "They blocked the railroad but were forced by Interior Ministry forces to reopen it again," said Nikolai Shtyrkov, first deputy chairman of the Russian Independent Coal Miners' Union. "There were no clashes," said Shtyrkov, who added the action lasted about three hours and followed two days of protests alongside the line.
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NEWS
July 4, 1998 | Reuters
Unpaid Russian miners blocked the strategic Trans-Siberian railway line for three hours on Friday before being removed by police, a union official said. "They blocked the railroad but were forced by Interior Ministry forces to reopen it again," said Nikolai Shtyrkov, first deputy chairman of the Russian Independent Coal Miners' Union. "There were no clashes," said Shtyrkov, who added the action lasted about three hours and followed two days of protests alongside the line.
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NEWS
May 25, 1998 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Striking coal miners lifted a 10-day-old blockade of the Trans-Siberian and other vital railroads Sunday after the government promised to pay some overdue wages. But the breakthrough probably provided only a short pause in a disruptive clash over how to handle looming mine closures.
NEWS
May 25, 1998 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Striking coal miners lifted a 10-day-old blockade of the Trans-Siberian and other vital railroads Sunday after the government promised to pay some overdue wages. But the breakthrough probably provided only a short pause in a disruptive clash over how to handle looming mine closures.
NEWS
December 3, 1992 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An unruly crowd swarmed around the train as it rolled into Mariinsk at dusk, five hours late. To passengers who had just been lulled by a fat orange sunset over the snow-covered Siberian forest, the desperation in the Russian townsfolk's eyes was startling. For the 15 minutes it stood in the station, the train was a chaotic market on wheels. Platoons of Chinese merchants descended with their awaited cargo of winter jackets, or dangled them teasingly through the windows.
NEWS
November 25, 1997 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the frozen Siberian wilderness, there lies an untapped territory so abundant in natural resources that Russian officials proclaim it the richest region on Earth. Someday, they say, a monumental rail line--a second Trans-Siberian Railway--will haul minerals and timber from this hinterland and make Russia wealthy. The dream of exploiting this fortune dates back to the czars.
NEWS
October 3, 1995 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Crowded escalators plunge swiftly into the dim depths of the Metro, hurling their loads of humanity onto the heels of commuters milling on the platforms below. A grimy train screeches into the station behind an acrid blast of wind. The impatient people push and shove. The inattentive get trampled. The steel doors of the cars slam shut in seconds, abandoning the slow and the weak and the elderly to wage their battles for passage another time.
NEWS
November 25, 1997 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the frozen Siberian wilderness, there lies an untapped territory so abundant in natural resources that Russian officials proclaim it the richest region on Earth. Someday, they say, a monumental rail line--a second Trans-Siberian Railway--will haul minerals and timber from this hinterland and make Russia wealthy. The dream of exploiting this fortune dates back to the czars.
NEWS
October 3, 1995 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Crowded escalators plunge swiftly into the dim depths of the Metro, hurling their loads of humanity onto the heels of commuters milling on the platforms below. A grimy train screeches into the station behind an acrid blast of wind. The impatient people push and shove. The inattentive get trampled. The steel doors of the cars slam shut in seconds, abandoning the slow and the weak and the elderly to wage their battles for passage another time.
NEWS
December 3, 1992 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An unruly crowd swarmed around the train as it rolled into Mariinsk at dusk, five hours late. To passengers who had just been lulled by a fat orange sunset over the snow-covered Siberian forest, the desperation in the Russian townsfolk's eyes was startling. For the 15 minutes it stood in the station, the train was a chaotic market on wheels. Platoons of Chinese merchants descended with their awaited cargo of winter jackets, or dangled them teasingly through the windows.
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