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NEWS
February 2, 1989
An 8-year-old legal battle between Alhambra and the Southern Pacific Railroad has ended with the city paying the railroad $6.8 million, according to City Manager Kevin Murphy. The lawsuit stems from a joint project between the city, the railroad and the state to eliminate grade crossings along Mission Boulevard, Murphy said. Previously, the tracks had been at street level, contributing to traffic congestion at crossings.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 18, 2002 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Aaron Danzig, 89, a lawyer who argued against the Erie Railroad Co. in a negligence lawsuit that became a landmark U.S. Supreme Court case, died Sept. 10 in New York City. In the 1938 case Erie Railroad Co. vs. Tompkins, Danzig represented a man whose arm was severed in a railroad accident in Pennsylvania. In the case, Pennsylvania law required proof of willful or wanton negligence on the part of the railroad for an accident victim to collect damages.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 18, 2002 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Aaron Danzig, 89, a lawyer who argued against the Erie Railroad Co. in a negligence lawsuit that became a landmark U.S. Supreme Court case, died Sept. 10 in New York City. In the 1938 case Erie Railroad Co. vs. Tompkins, Danzig represented a man whose arm was severed in a railroad accident in Pennsylvania. In the case, Pennsylvania law required proof of willful or wanton negligence on the part of the railroad for an accident victim to collect damages.
BUSINESS
May 9, 2002 | LISA GIRION, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Thirty-six railroad workers will share in a $2.2-million settlement announced Wednesday of a landmark lawsuit that accused Burlington Northern Santa Fe Corp. of violating the Americans with Disabilities Act by secretly conducting genetic tests to investigate workers' compensation claims. Filed in February 2001, the suit targeted the first known case of on-the-job genetic testing.
BUSINESS
May 9, 2002 | LISA GIRION, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Thirty-six railroad workers will share in a $2.2-million settlement announced Wednesday of a landmark lawsuit that accused Burlington Northern Santa Fe Corp. of violating the Americans with Disabilities Act by secretly conducting genetic tests to investigate workers' compensation claims. Filed in February 2001, the suit targeted the first known case of on-the-job genetic testing.
NEWS
February 2, 1989
An 8-year-old legal battle between Alhambra and the Southern Pacific Railroad has ended with the city paying the railroad $6.8 million, according to City Manager Kevin Murphy. The lawsuit stems from a joint project between the city, the railroad and the state to eliminate grade crossings along Mission Boulevard, Murphy said. Previously, the tracks had been at street level, contributing to traffic congestion at crossings.
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