Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRailroads United States
IN THE NEWS

Railroads United States

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
September 17, 1997 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
F-Trooper died as he had lived, with a cigarette in one hand and a can of Schmidt's Ice beer in the other. They found him when the Montana Rail Link pulled into the repair shop. F-Trooper was sitting there in one of the boxcars as he so often had before--except this time he had five bullets in his head. Police had little to go on: a blood-spattered cardboard 12-pack between Tracks 3 and 4. Bloody footprints in the boxcar. Some spent shell casings. A tattoo on F-Trooper that said "F.T.R.A."
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 2, 2002 | RICARDO ALONSO-ZALDIVAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Amtrak said Friday that it will shut down later this year all long-distance routes that don't turn a profit unless Congress more than doubles its annual subsidy to $1.2 billion. The national passenger rail system also announced immediate spending cuts of $285 million, including the elimination of 1,000 jobs, or 4% of its work force.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
March 11, 1998
* Union Pacific vowed to make "very substantial improvement" within 30 days in the nation's massive railroad freight traffic jam. The rail company told federal regulators it may resort to a temporary ban on new freight from its system or transfer business to its competitors. * A year after debuting her home furnishings line at Kmart stores, Martha Stewart is expanding the line with about 600 products, including bathroom accessories.
BUSINESS
October 4, 2000 | From Reuters
The U.S. Surface Transportation Board proposed rules Tuesday that would make it tougher for major railroad companies to merge in light of serious delays and other problems that resulted from recent combinations. New rules would require companies to show how a merger would enhance competition and be more accountable for claimed merger benefits and service promises, the agency said, reversing a 20-year pro-merger stance.
BUSINESS
October 4, 2000 | From Reuters
The U.S. Surface Transportation Board proposed rules Tuesday that would make it tougher for major railroad companies to merge in light of serious delays and other problems that resulted from recent combinations. New rules would require companies to show how a merger would enhance competition and be more accountable for claimed merger benefits and service promises, the agency said, reversing a 20-year pro-merger stance.
BUSINESS
August 9, 1996 | From Associated Press
Concluding that less-than-daily service doesn't work, Amtrak plans to close down four routes, including one involving Los Angeles, and return to daily service on several others in an effort to save money and increase income. Faced with a potential $258-million deficit for 1997, the national passenger railroad said Thursday that it will make sweeping changes in its service effective Nov. 10.
NEWS
June 10, 1988
The Senate gave final congressional approval to a bill that would for the first time prohibit train crews from disabling safety devices and require railroad engineers to obtain licenses. The legislation, which was approved on a voice vote, now goes to the White House for President Reagan's signature. Administration officials have expressed support for the measure. The bill is a response to the Jan. 4, 1987, disaster in Chase, Md.
BUSINESS
April 7, 1995 | From Associated Press
Amtrak on Thursday announced a series of cutbacks--including one on a route into California--scheduled to take place in June and September as the passenger railroad tries to eliminate red ink. Without the cutbacks, which will total 24% of the railroad's service when complete, Amtrak might have been facing bankruptcy by midsummer, said Thomas M. Downs, president of the railroad.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 22, 1999 | DAVID HALDANE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Boarding Bill Hatrick's railroad car is like stepping into a time machine. The lavish Art Deco lounge exudes the luxury of the 1940s. A bartender behind a wood-paneled quarter-circle serves cream sodas to the passengers. And beside the steward's room is what may be the country's last operating barbershop on wheels. "America has a secret love affair with trains," says Hatrick, 39, a sometime locomotive engineer and part-time mechanic from Santa Ana.
BUSINESS
August 8, 1998 | From Bloomberg News
Union Pacific Corp. is experiencing new railroad delays in Southern California, heightening fears among shippers that the railroad is still suffering the effects of the worst freight logjam in recent history. In a letter to customers, the nation's largest railroad acknowledged it was experiencing problems at the Los Angeles and Long Beach ports--the nation's two busiest ports--and on a major line from California to El Paso, Texas.
BUSINESS
May 13, 1998 | MELINDA FULMER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Despite issuing assurances earlier this year that freight traffic jams in Southern California and elsewhere were easing, Union Pacific Corp. is indicating it's made little progress in alleviating delays. In its weekly report to federal regulators, the railroad operator said personnel problems and track construction are still causing major delays in the Southland. "They are still running behind," said Jack Kyser, chief economist of the Los Angeles Economic Development Corp.
BUSINESS
March 11, 1998
* Union Pacific vowed to make "very substantial improvement" within 30 days in the nation's massive railroad freight traffic jam. The rail company told federal regulators it may resort to a temporary ban on new freight from its system or transfer business to its competitors. * A year after debuting her home furnishings line at Kmart stores, Martha Stewart is expanding the line with about 600 products, including bathroom accessories.
NEWS
September 17, 1997 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
F-Trooper died as he had lived, with a cigarette in one hand and a can of Schmidt's Ice beer in the other. They found him when the Montana Rail Link pulled into the repair shop. F-Trooper was sitting there in one of the boxcars as he so often had before--except this time he had five bullets in his head. Police had little to go on: a blood-spattered cardboard 12-pack between Tracks 3 and 4. Bloody footprints in the boxcar. Some spent shell casings. A tattoo on F-Trooper that said "F.T.R.A."
BUSINESS
August 9, 1996 | From Associated Press
Concluding that less-than-daily service doesn't work, Amtrak plans to close down four routes, including one involving Los Angeles, and return to daily service on several others in an effort to save money and increase income. Faced with a potential $258-million deficit for 1997, the national passenger railroad said Thursday that it will make sweeping changes in its service effective Nov. 10.
NEWS
April 4, 1995 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Amtrak, which has had its share of high-profile wrecks, has run head-on into a largely unsympathetic Congress that's on a drive to cut all federal deficits. Whether the national railroad passenger system can survive this particular collision is uncertain. Republicans are approaching the issue from multiple angles. Rep. Frank R. Wolf (R-Va.
NEWS
July 23, 1995 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a throwback to the Wild West, freight trains thundering through this parched valley are being swarmed by bandits who plunder their cargoes, then flee back across the Mexican border--which in some places is only 10 paces from the tracks. The thieves stage their raids from a nearby squatters' camp, a cluster of cardboard and wood shanties where 40,000 people live without running water, sewers or law enforcement. It is known as Colonia Anapra.
BUSINESS
April 7, 1995 | From Associated Press
Amtrak on Thursday announced a series of cutbacks--including one on a route into California--scheduled to take place in June and September as the passenger railroad tries to eliminate red ink. Without the cutbacks, which will total 24% of the railroad's service when complete, Amtrak might have been facing bankruptcy by midsummer, said Thomas M. Downs, president of the railroad.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|