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Railroads

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 30, 1998 | DEBRA CANO
Calling it the most important issue to affect Placentia for decades to come, the City Council recently agreed to pursue a plan to lower railroad tracks along Orangethorpe Avenue. The five-mile stretch of track became the focus of debate after county transportation officials proposed building overpasses or underpasses to reduce long traffic delays. Rail traffic is expected to double in coming years. Nine streets cross the tracks along Orangethorpe between Lakeview and Placentia avenues.
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NEWS
November 12, 1989 | CHARLES HILLINGER'S
Among America's more than 250,000 model railroaders, John Nehrich is a living legend. When he graduated from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in 1972, he gave up a career as a chemist to devote his life to a model railroad layout in the basement of a college dorm. He spends at least 60 hours a week working on the massive layout that he and RPI students painstakingly have put together over the last two decades.
BUSINESS
May 15, 1987
During a hearing before the Interstate Commerce Commission in which Santa Fe Southern Pacific Corp. asked the commission to reconsider the proposed merger of its two subsidiary railroads, ICC Chairman Heather Gradison asked S. P. lawyer Douglas Stephenson, "Are you worth more dead or alive?" If the merger is ultimately denied, Santa Fe Southern Pacific will have to sell one or both railroads.
BUSINESS
July 4, 1996 | JESUS SANCHEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an era of speedy jet planes and endless superhighways, the chugging locomotive resembles an Industrial Age dinosaur lumbering across the landscape. But the nation's railroads are far from extinct, even after losing much of their business to truckers and other rivals. Trains still carry nearly 40% of the freight that moves between the nation's cities, and in Southern California they are a crucial link between the booming ports and markets to the east.
BUSINESS
July 1, 2009 | Ronald D. White
The heavy-metal clash as rail cars slam together is like a symphony to Andrew Fox, and he can hear just how well each note is played as trains assemble on the railroad he runs. On a recent morning, Fox winced only once. "It can be too hard or too soft. You can just tell when it isn't quite right," said Fox, president of Pacific Harbor Line Inc., which operates inside the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach.
WORLD
September 18, 2002 | BARBARA DEMICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hopeful that this time the long-stalled project will go forward, South Korea today celebrated the groundbreaking of railroad lines through the demilitarized zone that would reconnect the North and South Korean lines after more than half a century. The North Koreans reportedly were holding simultaneous ceremonies on their side of the 2 1/2-mile-wide strip that divides the two nations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 17, 1996 | JOHN COX
It was the craftsmanship that lured Carol Julian to Long Beach on Tuesday. Miniature carousels, cows and cabooses--all small enough to hold in the palm of your hand--have fascinated the Woodland Hills saleswoman since she bought her first model trains four years ago. "I thought they looked cute," Julian said as she browsed a 476-foot-long miniature railroad track assembled on the third floor of the Long Beach Sheraton. "I bought them and I put them on a table and that ended up being not enough."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 1, 1996 | SHELBY GRAD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Michael Maxein doesn't need experts to tell him about the resurgence of rail transportation in Orange County. The Santa Ana man experiences it first-hand when two dozen freight and passenger trains a day lumber past his mobile home park, their safety horns unleashing shrill blasts designed to stop traffic--literally. "When I'm outside, I have to hold my ears," Maxein said. "The noise is incredible--you just can't take the decibel level of those horns. You try to get used to it, but you can't."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 21, 1995 | MIMI KO
After years of debate over whether to build an underpass at the railroad tracks on Highland Avenue, the City Council voted this week to go ahead with the project, despite objections from a number of merchants. The underpass, which the city said earlier could be completed only by taking land from property owners, will not require eminent domain proceedings, according to the new plan. But it will steer customers away, some business owners said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 1993 | FRANK MESSINA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Work crews began clearing tons of landslide debris Wednesday from the railroad tracks on the Los Angeles to San Diego line, and officials said the effort would not jeopardize nearby ocean bluffs. As construction workers drilled into the huge pile of fallen earth and stone to install a 20-foot-high retaining wall by the tracks, officials said the massive slide that struck Feb. 22, destroying five homes, appears to have stabilized.
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