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Rails To Trails Conservancy

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NEWS
March 29, 1991 | DAN LOGAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Railroads don't go as many places as they once did, but railroad holdings and rights of way still cut through our back yards, downtowns and meadows. Roughly 100,000 miles of abandoned strips of land that used to be lined with railroad ties are part of what greenbelt advocates call America's "recreational frontier." Many of these rights of way are tiny sections and remnants of the rail system that time and altered transportation needs have orphaned.
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NATIONAL
March 10, 2014 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON - The Supreme Court dealt a setback Monday to the popular redevelopment trend of transforming abandoned railroad lines into public bike paths, ruling that buyers of such lands are not required to continue granting a federal right of way. Legal experts said the decision would make it harder to build bike or hiking trails in areas of the West where railroads were often built on former federal land. In some instances, local governments may be forced to pay compensation to owners whose land is now crossed by bike paths or other government-built trails and parks.
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NATIONAL
March 10, 2014 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON - The Supreme Court dealt a setback Monday to the popular redevelopment trend of transforming abandoned railroad lines into public bike paths, ruling that buyers of such lands are not required to continue granting a federal right of way. Legal experts said the decision would make it harder to build bike or hiking trails in areas of the West where railroads were often built on former federal land. In some instances, local governments may be forced to pay compensation to owners whose land is now crossed by bike paths or other government-built trails and parks.
SPORTS
October 7, 1992 | JULIE CART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ideas sometimes die because they are too simple or too useful. Some people have more faith in projects that require elaborate planning and generate stacks of reports. How, then, to assess Janice Adams' simple idea? Why not take the 12.2 miles of abandoned railway line, stretching from Santa Monica to USC, and convert the right of way to an urban trail, suitable for bikers, joggers or walkers?
SPORTS
October 7, 1992 | JULIE CART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ideas sometimes die because they are too simple or too useful. Some people have more faith in projects that require elaborate planning and generate stacks of reports. How, then, to assess Janice Adams' simple idea? Why not take the 12.2 miles of abandoned railway line, stretching from Santa Monica to USC, and convert the right of way to an urban trail, suitable for bikers, joggers or walkers?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 2001
A coalition of trail advocacy groups will hold a community forum today to discuss proposed bike paths along Santiago Creek and the abandoned Tustin Branch railroad corridor. The Tustin Branch trail would follow the abandoned rail line with some diversions roads. The Santiago Creek trail is ultimately planned to extend the entire length of the creek and through the city.
NEWS
October 1, 1992
Community bicycling groups will hold a rally Saturday to advocate turning the Exposition right of way into a bike path. The abandoned rail corridor runs for 12 miles along Exposition Boulevard, from Memorial Park in Santa Monica to USC. The Los Angeles County Transportation Commission has tentative plans for a light rail line using the right of way, but funding for the project could be years away.
SPORTS
June 18, 1994 | From Associated Press
The Rails to Trails Conservancy dedicated its 600th trail this month with the promise that there will be more and longer trails. With the dedication in Indianapolis of trail No. 600, 6,989 miles of abandoned railroads had been converted to trails, said Peter Harnik, RTC's vice president for trail development. "We plan to have 10,000 miles by 1997," he said. The movement to convert abandoned rail lines to trails began in the mid-1960s.
NEWS
July 21, 1986 | CHARLES HILLINGER, Times Staff Writer and
For 50 years, steam locomotives pulling flatcars stacked with timber snaked through the woods along the banks of the fast-flowing Susan River. Now, there are no trains, but joggers, hikers, equestrians and cyclists on fat-tired bikes wind their way along the 25-mile, single-track railbed called the Bizz Johnson Trail. One of the first of its kind in the West, this "rails-to-trails" park between Westwood and Susanville in Northern California's Lassen County was dedicated last month.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 7, 1993 | SCOTT GLOVER
As part of a nationwide trail project, planners from two conservation groups are studying the feasibility of converting about 50 miles of abandoned or under-used Valley railroad corridors into recreational trails. Planners from the Eos Institute and Rails-to-Trails Conservancy are beginning talks with city and county officials and other groups to look into developing trails along the routes of two active and one abandoned San Fernando Valley railroad.
NEWS
March 29, 1991 | DAN LOGAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Railroads don't go as many places as they once did, but railroad holdings and rights of way still cut through our back yards, downtowns and meadows. Roughly 100,000 miles of abandoned strips of land that used to be lined with railroad ties are part of what greenbelt advocates call America's "recreational frontier." Many of these rights of way are tiny sections and remnants of the rail system that time and altered transportation needs have orphaned.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 28, 2004 | Hugo Martin, Times Staff Writer
The Pacific Electric Railway was once the world's largest inter-urban railway system, stretching from Santa Monica to Redlands. Little remains of the 1,000-mile network except a few train stations, some of its trolleys, called Red Cars, in museums, and miles of vacant right of way. But in San Bernardino County, work has begun to transform some of the rail corridors into a paved attraction for walkers, bicyclists and others.
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