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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 1985 | From Times Wire Services
Frank Barnett, former chairman and chief executive officer of Union Pacific Corp., has died at a Manhattan hospital after a heart attack, the company announced. Barnett, 72, a key figure in the reorganization in 1973 of six bankrupt Northeastern railroads into Conrail, died at St. Luke's Hospital Thursday, a spokeswoman said. Barnett joined Union Pacific in 1951 as a lawyer and became chief executive officer and chairman of the executive committee in 1967.
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WORLD
April 19, 2014 | By Julie Makinen
BEIJING - On the first Sunday of March, China awoke to sickening news: Black-clad attackers with knives had hacked through crowds at the train station in the southern city of Kunming, killing 29 and injuring more than 140. Reporters leaped into action, gathering details from victims in their hospital beds. President Xi Jinping urged all-out efforts to investigate the slaughter. The incident was quickly dubbed "China's 9/11. " But by nightfall Monday, the state-run New China News Agency signaled that it was time to move on. "Kunming railway station serious violent terror case is successfully solved," its headline said.
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BUSINESS
July 21, 2010 | By Richard Verrier, Los Angeles Times
Dave Wilkinson steered his pickup truck along a bumpy dirt road before making a sharp turn across a train track and parking in front of three big-top tents that rise above fields of beets and garbanzo beans. Wilkinson lowered his window to talk to a set decorator as they waited for a locomotive to reposition 14 wooden railway cars to be featured in the Fox film "Water for Elephants," based on a book about a traveling circus struggling to survive during the Great Depression. "The train has become a rolling prop," said Wilkinson on a recent sweltering weekday afternoon.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 2014 | By Dan Weikel
Visibility was 10 miles and the morning sun had pushed the temperature close to 90 as Danny Joe Hall guided his mile-long Union Pacific freight train east through the grasslands of the Oklahoma Panhandle. Near the farming town of Goodwell, federal investigators said, the 56-year-old engineer sped through a series of yellow and red signals warning him to slow down and stop for a Los Angeles-bound train moving slowly onto a side track. The 83-mph collision killed Hall and two crewmen.
TRAVEL
September 8, 1996 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
Thailand hopes to attract tourists and improve trade by rebuilding the notorious World War II "Death Railway" between Bangkok and Rangoon, Burma (now Myanmar). The plan is still in its early stages, but Interior Ministry officials said recently that they hope Japan and the Allied nations will help finance the project.
NEWS
December 17, 1986 | From Reuters
The United States and China have agreed to share information on railway science and technology and to work together on railroad projects over the next five years, the government said Tuesday. "By sharing information and expertise and by working on important projects together, we can better serve our mutual interests in safer and more efficient railroad systems," said Transportation Secretary Elizabeth Dole, who signed the accord Monday on behalf of the United States.
TRAVEL
September 21, 1986
The Aug. 24 article ". . .On Chilkoot Trail" was indeed very puzzling. This regarded Ladislaw Reday's description of his travels on the White Pass and Yukon Route (Railway) which he identified as the Yukon & White Pass Railroad. It would seem that Reday had a most enjoyable time riding that wonderful old narrow-gauge railway, as I had done many times in the 1960s. However, according to all the information I have, the White Pass & Yukon Route ceased operations in 1982. The completion of the Klondike Highway from Skagway through Carcross to the Alaska Highway and thence to Whitehorse (Yukon Territory)
NEWS
February 15, 1987
Botswana's vital rail links with South Africa, closed for a day by one of South Africa's nominally independent black homelands, have been reopened. Easing of the confrontation followed hasty talks in Gaborone, Botswana's capital, between the government of that small black nation and South African railway officials.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 2008 | From the Associated Press
The sculpture shows a man about to fall under a subway car driven by a Grim Reaper figure. Its creator says it was a tribute to train drivers and the fears they face. But the work's planned home, a London railway station, said Monday that it had canceled plans to put it on display after complaints by railway unions and the families of suicide victims. Officials at St. Pancras station, the hub for Eurostar high-speed shuttle services to France and Belgium, said the carving by sculptor Paul Day was inappropriate.
NEWS
April 28, 1989 | From Reuters
A walkout stalled trains, buses and subways in Spain on Thursday as transportation workers pressed demands for higher wages and improved working conditions. The state railway ran only a skeleton service on the first day of a three-day strike that coincided with a one-day stoppage by public transport employees in Madrid, Barcelona and several other cities.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 2014 | By Jeffrey Fleishman
It's too easy to start with the face or what she wears, how she sits. The color of her earrings. The essence is in the vowels, the way she holds and releases them. The voice drops a register, as if in a conspiracy, and a morning conversation drifts across art, ambition, age and riding camels in the desert. Many roles come to mind when Nicole Kidman speaks: inconsolable mother, suicidal writer, dangerous weather girl, nuclear scientist, gangster lover, top-hatted cabaret singer and Southern femme fatale with an earthy remedy for jellyfish stings.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 2014 | By Gary Goldstein
An alternately delicate and brutal retelling of the memoir by former World War II British Army officer Eric Lomax, "The Railway Man" is an impressively crafted, skillfully acted, highly absorbing journey into a dark corner of world history. Colin Firth plays Lomax in 1980, more than 35 years after being tortured at a Japanese labor camp in Thailand. He learns that Takashi Nagase, the Japanese interpreter at the helm of that cruel, unforgettable punishment, is still alive. Lomax will eventually cross continents to confront his erstwhile captor and hopefully quell the post-traumatic stress disorder that has plagued the self-dubbed "railway enthusiast" for decades.
WORLD
March 1, 2014 | By Julie Makinen
SHANGHAI -- At least 27 people died and more than 100 were injured Saturday when a group of knife-wielding assailants attacked a railway station in southern China, state-run media reported. Gruesome photos of the scene in Kunming from a local TV news broadcast showed several people, their clothing soaked in blood, lying on a tile floor inside the station, and more people on the ground outside. State-run CCTV news said authorities had killed the attackers. There was no immediate word on the identity of the assailants or their motives.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 15, 2014 | By Tony Barboza
BNSF Railway has pleaded no contest to criminal charges and agreed to pay $140,000 in penalties, medical expenses and emergency response costs stemming from a 2012 spill of hazardous chemicals near the Port of Los Angeles, the city attorney announced this week. The rail company had failed to report the June 23, 2012, spill and created a public nuisance when several drums in a cargo container it was transporting leaked phenol, cresylic acid and other corrosive chemicals, City Atty.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 11, 2013 | By Samantha Schaefer, Kate Mather and Scott Gold
In theory, the tiny railway was a quaint, enduring witness - watching as commuters gave up horses and buggies for tail-finned Cadillacs; as the prim Victorians atop Bunker Hill gave way to rooming houses and then shimmering skyscrapers; as downtown Los Angeles went from bustling to decrepit and back again. In practice, Angels Flight has become an emblem of the way in which Los Angeles preserves and celebrates its young history: imperfectly. On Thursday, the National Transportation Safety Board revealed that in the months before a September derailment, operators of the historic railway had been using a small tree branch to hold down the start button to keep the trains running.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 10, 2013 | By Samantha Schaefer
Operators of the historic Angels Flight railway in downtown Los Angeles had been using a tree branch to override a safety system in the months before a derailment in September, the latest in a series of accidents and safety concerns for the funicular. The railway, which carries passengers up and down a steep hill between the Hill Street shopping district and Bunker Hill, had been experiencing "unintended stops" for months, with multiple interruptions during each trip at the time of the accident, the National Transportation Safety Board said in a report released Thursday.
TRAVEL
April 21, 1991
Time after time I have read that the Mexican train goes through or into Mexico's Copper Canyon Country (Letters From Readers, April 6). This is erroneous. It does not. I am a life member of the San Diego Railway Museum Assn. and have made the trip all the way to Copper Canyon by rail. EDWARD D. BRECK Paso Robles
TRAVEL
June 14, 1998 | TIMES ROME BUREAU
While a fatal German trail derailment captured headlines earlier this month, Italians were fretting about problems with their own high-speed passenger trains. So far this year, one person has been killed and 54 injured in four major incidents involving Italy's state railway, especially its ETR-500 fast trains. Two weeks ago, about 250 passengers were trapped for four hours in a tunnel on the heavily touristed Rome-Florence route after the train's overhead power line broke.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 8, 2013 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
TORONTO -- As much as I love challenging films, I'm not sure I would recommend starting the day with “The Railway Man,” with Colin Firth as a British World War II vet suffering serious post traumatic stress disorder, and ending it at midnight with an emaciated Matthew McConaughey in “Dallas Buyers Club,” as a good ol' Texas boy diagnosed in the first wave of the AIDS crisis. But I did. It's the blessing and the curse of film festivals packed with tons of intriguing movies and tight schedules.
WORLD
July 12, 2013 | By Carol J. Williams
As Canadian investigators sift through the gruesome wreckage of an oil train derailment and explosion in Lac Megantic, Quebec, the deadly crash has intensified a debate among environmentalists and energy-independence advocates as to whether it is safer to ship oil by rail or by pipeline. The circuitous route the oil involved in the accident was taking to its ultimate destination - U.S. consumers - also illustrates the conundrum faced by North American producers eager to get their crude oil to a far-flung network of specialized refineries within easy onward delivery range of the intended markets.
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