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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 6, 2010 | By Christopher Hawthorne
Raimund Abraham, an Austrian-born architect known for his powerfully enigmatic drawings and fierce idealism, and whose narrow, blade-like 2002 Austrian Cultural Forum building in New York is among the most forceful pieces of architecture built in the last decade, was killed early Thursday when the car he was driving collided in downtown Los Angeles with a Metropolitan Transportation Authority bus. He was 76. The accident, at 5th and Main streets, came...
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 2010 | By CHRISTOPHER HAWTHORNE, Architecture Critic
The two stories that have dominated the architectural press over the last few weeks -- the unveiling of a winning design for a new American embassy in London, and the death, in a downtown Los Angeles traffic accident, of the 76-year-old Austrian architect Raimund Abraham -- have more in common than just a spot on the calendar. Both are directly connected to the same set of questions: How should an architect approach the task of designing a building to represent his home country abroad?
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NEWS
April 17, 2003 | Anne Valdespino, Times Staff Writer
Architect Raimund Abraham was finally free. He had just finished an "agonizing" 10-year project -- construction of the Austrian Cultural Institute in New York -- and resigned his teaching position after 30 years at the Cooper Union. But he came to Los Angeles and fell in love and, before he knew it, he was teaching again. The object of his affection is a building on 3rd Street downtown: the long, narrow Santa Fe freight depot, now the campus of the Southern California Institute of Architecture.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 6, 2010 | By Christopher Hawthorne
Raimund Abraham, an Austrian-born architect known for his powerfully enigmatic drawings and fierce idealism, and whose narrow, blade-like 2002 Austrian Cultural Forum building in New York is among the most forceful pieces of architecture built in the last decade, was killed early Thursday when the car he was driving collided in downtown Los Angeles with a Metropolitan Transportation Authority bus. He was 76. The accident, at 5th and Main streets, came...
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 2010 | By CHRISTOPHER HAWTHORNE, Architecture Critic
The two stories that have dominated the architectural press over the last few weeks -- the unveiling of a winning design for a new American embassy in London, and the death, in a downtown Los Angeles traffic accident, of the 76-year-old Austrian architect Raimund Abraham -- have more in common than just a spot on the calendar. Both are directly connected to the same set of questions: How should an architect approach the task of designing a building to represent his home country abroad?
ENTERTAINMENT
August 5, 1988 | CATHY CURTIS
Talk about clever--what a coup to get prominent and up-and-coming architects to design California lifeguard towers. It's fun, it's smart and it's likely to snag the attention of people who didn't think they'd ever be poring over models and plans. Unlike the jerry-rigged foamcore variety, these models are impeccably turned out. The drawings encompass restless scribbles, pristine geometries and amusing commentaries.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 2011 | By Christopher Hawthorne, Los Angeles Times Architecture Critic
Los Angeles architect Neil Denari's new residential tower on the West Side of Manhattan is a standout building in ways that begin with — but aren't limited to — its gymnastic form. Known as HL23, for its site where 23rd Street meets the High Line elevated park, the 14-story tower is among the most ambitious of the many buildings spawned by the opening of the wildly popular park in 2009. And in a reversal of the architectural setbacks for which New York has long been famous, HL23 doesn't get narrower as it goes up; it rises from a small footprint in the shadow of the High Line and grows opportunistically wider, so that portions of its upper half lean out over the park itself.
NEWS
April 17, 2003 | Anne Valdespino, Times Staff Writer
Architect Raimund Abraham was finally free. He had just finished an "agonizing" 10-year project -- construction of the Austrian Cultural Institute in New York -- and resigned his teaching position after 30 years at the Cooper Union. But he came to Los Angeles and fell in love and, before he knew it, he was teaching again. The object of his affection is a building on 3rd Street downtown: the long, narrow Santa Fe freight depot, now the campus of the Southern California Institute of Architecture.
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