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NEWS
January 5, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
Heavy rains in the Brazilian states of Minas Gerais and Rio de Janeiro have left at least 63 people dead and nearly 20,000 homeless, local radio and television said. A state of emergency has been declared in several towns, with heavy rains forecast to continue in both states over the weekend.
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NEWS
January 5, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
Heavy rains in the Brazilian states of Minas Gerais and Rio de Janeiro have left at least 63 people dead and nearly 20,000 homeless, local radio and television said. A state of emergency has been declared in several towns, with heavy rains forecast to continue in both states over the weekend.
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NEWS
December 22, 1989 | Associated Press
Two weeks of pounding rains in northern Brazil have killed 32 people and left thousands homeless, civil defense officials said Thursday.
NEWS
February 17, 1991 | PETER MUELLO, ASSOCIATED PRESS
When the fierce Kayapo Indians meet Darrell Posey, an American anthropologist, they cover their eyes and weep. The ritual weeping is the greatest compliment Kayapo warriors can pay an outsider. It symbolizes the grief of separation from a respected member of the tribe. "It's a long wail and goes on and on," said Posey, 42, one of few whites the Kayapos hold in such high regard. "I get goose bumps just thinking of it." Posey, from Henderson, Ky.
BUSINESS
December 6, 1988 | From Associated Press
Grain and soybean futures prices dipped sharply Monday on the Chicago Board of Trade in a selloff led by a single large trading company and apparently linked to forecasts for rain in Brazil. On other markets, futures prices for oil and precious metals futures declined while stock index and pork futures advanced and cattle futures were mixed.
BUSINESS
January 4, 1989 | From Associated Press
Prices of coffee and cocoa futures rose sharply Tuesday while prices for cotton, sugar and orange juice futures plunged. On other markets, energy futures advanced; precious metals, grain, soybean, livestock and meat futures were mixed, and stock index futures retreated. On New York's Coffee, Sugar & Cocoa Exchange, coffee settled 2.5 to 6.56 cents higher, with the March contract at $1.659 a pound, the highest price for coffee futures since Nov. 13, 1986.
NEWS
February 17, 1991 | PETER MUELLO, ASSOCIATED PRESS
When the fierce Kayapo Indians meet Darrell Posey, an American anthropologist, they cover their eyes and weep. The ritual weeping is the greatest compliment Kayapo warriors can pay an outsider. It symbolizes the grief of separation from a respected member of the tribe. "It's a long wail and goes on and on," said Posey, 42, one of few whites the Kayapos hold in such high regard. "I get goose bumps just thinking of it." Posey, from Henderson, Ky.
NEWS
November 8, 1989 | From Times staff and wire service reports
Increased government control and inspection has significantly deccreased the destruction of the Amazon rain forest, Brazil's top environmental official said. Fernando Cesar Mesquita, the president of the Brazilian Institute of Environment and Renewable Natural Resources, said his agency estimates "the devastation will be 30% less" than last year, when illegal land clearing wrecked 55,350 square miles of forest.
BUSINESS
December 14, 1985 | From Associated Press
Coffee futures prices advanced dramatically Friday despite a move by an international marketing agency to expand export quotas for the world trade. Coffee prices set life-of-contract highs and were mostly up the limit of 6 cents a pound on the Coffee, Sugar and Cocoa Exchange in New York. Prices advanced strongly despite an announcement by the International Coffee Organization that high prices triggered the release of all additional increases in export quotas permitted for 1985-86.
BUSINESS
November 2, 1985 | From Associated Press
Coffee prices surged to five-year highs Friday on the Coffee, Sugar and Cocoa Exchange as damage estimates from a drought in Brazil continued to climb. Prices jumped by the daily trading limit Friday, even after the exchange expanded its limit to 6 cents from 4 cents in response to the recent surge. Damage to the crop in Brazil is likely to be extensive, said Kim Badenhop, a coffee analyst in New York with Merrill Lynch Futures.
NEWS
December 22, 1989 | Associated Press
Two weeks of pounding rains in northern Brazil have killed 32 people and left thousands homeless, civil defense officials said Thursday.
BUSINESS
January 4, 1989 | From Associated Press
Prices of coffee and cocoa futures rose sharply Tuesday while prices for cotton, sugar and orange juice futures plunged. On other markets, energy futures advanced; precious metals, grain, soybean, livestock and meat futures were mixed, and stock index futures retreated. On New York's Coffee, Sugar & Cocoa Exchange, coffee settled 2.5 to 6.56 cents higher, with the March contract at $1.659 a pound, the highest price for coffee futures since Nov. 13, 1986.
BUSINESS
December 6, 1988 | From Associated Press
Grain and soybean futures prices dipped sharply Monday on the Chicago Board of Trade in a selloff led by a single large trading company and apparently linked to forecasts for rain in Brazil. On other markets, futures prices for oil and precious metals futures declined while stock index and pork futures advanced and cattle futures were mixed.
BUSINESS
December 31, 1985 | From Associated Press
Little rain in Brazil helped send soybean futures prices upward Monday on the Chicago Board of Trade, traders said. Wheat and corn prices were mostly lower, with light trading reported in all the commodities. Prices for soybeans were supported by the lack of rain in the southern growing regions of Brazil, analysts said.
BUSINESS
January 11, 1986 | From Associated Press
Coffee futures prices resumed their upward march Friday after a one-day respite from what had become almost routine advances by the limit allowed for daily trading. "Traders are really uncertain about the direction of coffee prices, with them going down one day and up the next," said Pamela Rockley, an analyst in New York with Prudential-Bache Securities.
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