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NEWS
March 8, 1991 | GEORGE SKELTON, TIMES SACRAMENTO BUREAU CHIEF
Gov. Pete Wilson reported Thursday that the recent big storm dumped about 25% of an average year's rainfall on the state, but said most of the captured new water will be hoarded as a hedge against the drought possibly lingering into 1992. The drenching, which Wilson described as the equivalent of two normal winter storms, added more than 700,000 acre-feet of water to reservoirs in the Central Valley and along the North Coast, he said.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 2, 2014 | By Tony Barboza
El Niño, nature's most powerful influence on weather around the globe, has been in a lull for two years. But indications suggest that could change as early as fall. Since spring 2012, the eastern tropical Pacific Ocean has not warmed enough to create an El Niño. Nor has it cooled to form a La Niña. Instead, it has lingered in an in-between state some experts call "La Nada. " Though it is too early to predict with much certainty, scientists say their observations and computer models show increasing signs of El Niño's return, which might portend more rain for California.
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NEWS
December 28, 1991 | DAN MORAIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A 170-mile stretch of Interstate 5 through the San Joaquin Valley was closed for 12 hours Friday because of blinding dust as wind gusts of up to 50 m.p.h. and substantial rain hit California in the season's heaviest storm. The storm swept into Orange County shortly after 9 p.m., carried by 20-m.p.h winds. Up to two inches of rain from the slow-moving storm was expected to fall over California by tonight.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 2014 | By Los Angeles Times Staff and Fox 40, This post has been corrected. See the note below for details.
Amid record dry conditions around California, more than 100 people with the Muslim Community of Folsom prayed for rain during an event at Folsom Lake Saturday. The event came as officials across California have been expressing concern about drought-like conditions. For example, downtown Los Angeles had the driest year since 1877, when official measurements began. And only a trace amount of rain has fallen since Jan. 1, according to the National Weather Service. The Northern California event came at Folsom Lake, which has been receding to new record levels.
NEWS
March 30, 1991 | VIRGINIA ELLIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Disc jockeys spoof it. Stand-up comics use it to refresh their jokes. Residents scratch their heads in disbelief as they see water cascading down their window panes. Newscasters report mudslides and flash floods and warn of avalanches. Umbrella sales are up. And business prospects for nurseries are improving. But still state and federal officials won't budge: the Five-Year Drought isn't over.
NEWS
February 5, 1998 | MARY CURTIUS and MARIA L. La GANGA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Across the state, residents dug out from one winter storm Wednesday and braced for three others barreling in from the Pacific that forecasters said should dump several more inches of rain by Sunday on soggy communities. Gov. Pete Wilson declared a state of emergency in Ventura County and nine Northern California counties as public works crews struggled to restore essential services, clean storm drains and shore up sliding slopes before the next storm hits today.
NEWS
February 13, 1992 | JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The relentless stormy weather that brought death and devastation to the Southland on Wednesday caused comparatively modest miseries elsewhere in the state--and even inspired a smidgen of optimism among California's professional drought-watchers. Despite warnings of flash floods and dangerous mudslides, the storms' toll north of Ventura and Kern counties was limited to scattered traffic wrecks, minor flooding and closed roads.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 9, 1993 | MARK I. PINSKY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Weather forecasters sought Monday to ease fears in Orange County that early rains might wash away fire-denuded hillsides, turning layers of ash into mudslides. "The rain that will be coming in Wednesday and Thursday should stay in Northern and central California. There's a very slight chance of some light showers or drizzle, but it looks like the majority of the rain will stay in central California," said Curtis A. Brack, a meteorologist with WeatherData Inc.
NEWS
April 2, 1991 | CARL INGRAM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Weather forecasters said Monday that a powerful storm system similar to the March "miracles" that helped ease drought conditions is heading toward California and will bring heavy rain and snow to critical watersheds by week's end. "I hope it materializes as strongly as (meteorologists) seem to think it will," said Maurice D.
NEWS
April 4, 1991 | FREDERICK M. MUIR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Citing "substantial improvements" in water supplies during the last month, the Metropolitan Water District staff is recommending the giant agency roll back its planned cuts in deliveries this year from 50% to 31%. In a letter to the Board of Directors, MWD General Manager Carl Boronkay said he estimates that the heavy rains of March, alone, have increased the amount of water available to the district by 300,000 acre feet--enough to serve 600,000 families for a year.
SCIENCE
December 13, 2002 | Usha Lee McFarling, Times Staff Writer
El Nino is back. Government forecasters Thursday issued a new El Nino forecast, saying that the weather system has arrived and will pummel the East Coast with blizzards and ice storms this winter and exacerbate the extreme drought that has decimated corn, wheat and soybean crops in the Midwest. It is also expected to bring much needed rain to California.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 1998 | NONA YATES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Snow is gold out in the West." Garry Schaefer, hydrologist, Natural Resources Conservation Service * Water has always been an emotional subject in the West. From the pioneers who came in search of gold to the executives of today's corporate farms, western water has had many suitors.
NEWS
February 24, 1998 | ERIC MALNIC and DARYL KELLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
An intense, El Nino-boosted storm raked California with torrential rains and wind-driven snow Monday, toppling a giant eucalyptus tree that killed two people, and triggering mudslides and floods that blocked roads, cut rail lines and forced the temporary evacuation of 2,000 residents of Santa Paula. The eucalyptus tree crashed into a sport utility vehicle at a stop sign near the campus of the Claremont Colleges, Los Angeles County fire officials said.
NEWS
February 5, 1998 | MARY CURTIUS and MARIA L. La GANGA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Across the state, residents dug out from one winter storm Wednesday and braced for three others barreling in from the Pacific that forecasters said should dump several more inches of rain by Sunday on soggy communities. Gov. Pete Wilson declared a state of emergency in Ventura County and nine Northern California counties as public works crews struggled to restore essential services, clean storm drains and shore up sliding slopes before the next storm hits today.
NEWS
January 15, 1996 | MICHAEL GRANBERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Southern Californians have grown accustomed to the we're-so-lucky routine. It happens almost every year about now. The local weather broadcaster points to shivering scenes of snowbanks as tall as 11 feet in Boston, New York and Philadelphia and says cheerily, "Of course, it was nothing like that in Los Angeles today, where the temperature reached 85 degrees. . . . " Blue skies and mild temperatures aren't always reasons for celebration, as the drought-prone Southland has a history of proving.
NEWS
December 13, 1995 | PETER H. KING
This is being written on Tuesday morning, amid what appears to be the final furies of a huge, two-day storm. Much of Northern California is hip-deep in some form or another of elemental chaos. Steady rain has turned highways into running creeks and running creeks into full-blown rivers. Winds blowing as hard as 70 mph have set high-rises and bridges to swaying. Out by the sea, a sinkhole has swallowed a mansion. Entire towns are blacked out, school districts closed. For all of this, I apologize.
NEWS
March 24, 1991 | JESSE KATZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nearly a year ago, the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power drained the moat in front of its Hope Street headquarters, hoping the dry cement would dramatize the agency's commitment to conservation in a time of severe drought. Today, three weeks into mandatory rationing, the moat is filled with at least six inches of water-- rainwater-- dumped by storms that began drenching the state as soon as the cutbacks took effect.
NEWS
March 12, 1991 | VIRGINIA ELLIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A snowy weekend in the Sierra and a wet Sunday in Northern California kept the state from losing any more ground to the drought but did little to boost long-term water supplies, state officials said Monday. The best that the state's water experts would say for the weekend weather, which dropped half an inch of rainfall and a foot of snow, was that it soaked the soil thoroughly enough so that anymore storms should produce substantial runoff.
NEWS
June 17, 1995 | JOCELYN Y. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It hadn't happened to this extent since 1929, but on Friday people here battled the bizarre: rain and chilly temperatures in the middle of June. The unseasonable weather broke a 66-year-old record, forced the closure of the Six Flags water park near Valencia just hours after its grand opening, triggered a small landslide in Glendale, left a dusting of snow at Frazier Park and caused a slew of minor traffic accidents.
BUSINESS
March 14, 1995 | MICHAEL PARRISH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As a new storm lashed Northern California Monday, wholesale vegetable prices rose dramatically statewide, and it became clear that California farmers, particularly almond growers, sustained far greater damage over the weekend than initial reports indicated. That means California consumers are soon likely to be paying higher prices for some fruits and vegetables, including strawberries, broccoli, cauliflower and lettuce.
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