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Rain China

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July 6, 1997 | MAGGIE FARLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The sun set on the British Empire on Monday, and it hasn't come out since. From the day of the hand-over to Chinese rule, Hong Kong has received more than 30 inches of rain--a 100-year high--causing speculation in a week rife with symbolism about what the storms mean for the future of Hong Kong. People here considered the relentless downpour lucky at first: In Chinese, the word for "rain" sounds like the one for "money."
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NEWS
July 6, 1997 | MAGGIE FARLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The sun set on the British Empire on Monday, and it hasn't come out since. From the day of the hand-over to Chinese rule, Hong Kong has received more than 30 inches of rain--a 100-year high--causing speculation in a week rife with symbolism about what the storms mean for the future of Hong Kong. People here considered the relentless downpour lucky at first: In Chinese, the word for "rain" sounds like the one for "money."
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NEWS
July 3, 1996 | From Times Wire Services
Torrential rains and severe flooding across southern China have killed at least 51 people, driven tens of thousands from their homes and swamped huge swaths of farmland, officials and state media said today. Rising waters have forced 67,000 people from their homes in 96 towns around Hangzhou, capital of Zhejiang province, the official China Daily newspaper reported. At least 160,000 acres of farmland were inundated, the newspaper said.
NEWS
July 3, 1996 | From Times Wire Services
Torrential rains and severe flooding across southern China have killed at least 51 people, driven tens of thousands from their homes and swamped huge swaths of farmland, officials and state media said today. Rising waters have forced 67,000 people from their homes in 96 towns around Hangzhou, capital of Zhejiang province, the official China Daily newspaper reported. At least 160,000 acres of farmland were inundated, the newspaper said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 29, 1985 | From Reuters
Rainstorms in China's southern province of Guangdong killed 11 people and destroyed more than 8,000 houses last week, the China News Service said. Several days of rains damaged 44,000 houses in eight areas of Zhaoqing Prefecture west of Canton, according to imcomplete figures, it said.
SPORTS
January 21, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Defending champion Amelie Mauresmo and third-seeded Svetlana Kuznetsova dropped out in upsets today, and Andy Roddick survived a five-setter to remain alive in the Australian Open. The second-seeded Mauresmo dropped a 6-4, 6-3 decision to 70th-ranked Lucie Safarova, and Kuznetsova fell, 6-4, 6-2, to Shahar Peer in the women's fourth round. The sixth-seeded Roddick defeated No. 9 Mario Ancic, 6-3, 3-6, 6-1, 5-7, 6-4, to set up a men's quarterfinal against old friend and housemate Mardy Fish.
NEWS
August 10, 1999 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When monsoons and typhoons strike Asia, as they do every year in the steamy heat of summer, people ride out the storms and eventually take inventory of the death and destruction. This year, the southwest monsoons have swept out of the Indian Ocean with unusual force. They have lashed Asia from China to the Philippines with torrential rains and transformed the skies into displays of streaking lightning.
SPORTS
September 4, 2006 | Ben Bolch, From Times staff and wire reports
Pau Gasol's teammates kept their word, and he had a trophy for each crutch supporting him. Spain won its first world basketball championship without its star in a performance worthy of a Hollywood script. With the injured Gasol cheering from the bench, Spain beat Greece, 70-47, Sunday night at Saitama, Japan, in an emotional victory some thought couldn't happen and few thought would be so easy. Gasol led Spain (9-0) in scoring and rebounding throughout the tournament.
WORLD
May 15, 2008 | Mark Magnier and Ching-Ching Ni, Times Staff Writers
Everywhere you turned Wednesday, there was more bad news: The official death toll from China's earthquake climbed to nearly 15,000, with thousands still missing; 391 dams were damaged; and in Mianyang county, 3,600 passengers were trapped in trains, and 120 coal miners lost underground. Although survivors at the epicenter of the magnitude 7.9 earthquake began receiving some aid, tens of thousands of others were in dire straits, lacking food, water and shelter.
WORLD
July 16, 2007 | Don Lee, Times Staff Writer
The worst summer flooding in years has claimed more than 400 lives and wreaked billions of dollars in damage in central China. Here in the villages around Dongting Lake, rising waters have brought a plague of biblical proportions: an invasion of 2 billion mice. The rodents have been on the march in Hunan province since late June, when waters submerged mouse holes surrounding China's second-largest lake.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 29, 1985 | From Reuters
Rainstorms in China's southern province of Guangdong killed 11 people and destroyed more than 8,000 houses last week, the China News Service said. Several days of rains damaged 44,000 houses in eight areas of Zhaoqing Prefecture west of Canton, according to imcomplete figures, it said.
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