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SCIENCE
May 31, 2013 | By Geoffrey Mohan
Deforestaton is propeling fast changes in evolution, a study of the Brazilian rain forest suggests. Researchers found that in areas where populations of large-billed, fruit-eating birds, such as toucans, have been driven out because of deforestation, palm trees have evolved to produce smaller and less successful seeds. The Brazilian scientists collected more than 9,000 seeds from 22 palm populations in patches of rain forest that had been fragmented by coffee and sugar cane development during the 1800s.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 2014 | By Louis Sahagun
The Los Angeles Zoo's new Rainforest of the Americas exhibit doesn't open until Tuesday, but it is already filled with commotion. Dwarf caimans and a giant bird-eating spider were exploring the creature comforts of their enclosures this week. Construction workers were inspecting thermostats and water pumps. The $19-million exhibit at the Los Angeles Zoo and Botanical Gardens is the last in a series of major projects built under Phase 1 of the 47-year-old facility's master plan.
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SCIENCE
October 29, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn
High in the mountains of northeastern Australia, scientists have discovered three intriguing animals that are brand new to science, and you can see all three of them in the photo gallery above. They include the bizarre-looking leaf-tailed gecko ( Saltuarius eximius ) with its giant eyes and broad leaf-shaped tail; the golden shade skink ( Saproscincus saltus ), which resembles a short snake with legs; and an elegant little frog ( Cophixalus petrophilus ) that spends most of its life in the cool moist cracks between the black granite boulders strewn across the top of the mountain range.
SCIENCE
October 29, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn
High in the mountains of northeastern Australia, scientists have discovered three intriguing animals that are brand new to science, and you can see all three of them in the photo gallery above. They include the bizarre-looking leaf-tailed gecko ( Saltuarius eximius ) with its giant eyes and broad leaf-shaped tail; the golden shade skink ( Saproscincus saltus ), which resembles a short snake with legs; and an elegant little frog ( Cophixalus petrophilus ) that spends most of its life in the cool moist cracks between the black granite boulders strewn across the top of the mountain range.
SCIENCE
February 10, 2012 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times
Deforestation and climate change may sound like familiar concerns to the modern ear. But a team of French scientists is arguing that even 3,000 years ago, humans may have played a role in transforming the Central African rain forest into the savannas we see today. As Bantu farmers expanded south and east into the rain forest in search of fertile agricultural land, they may have created savanna "corridors" that cut into the forest and helped turn that lush landscape into drier grassland, according to a study published online this week in the journal Science.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 8, 1998
Even though rain forests only cover 6% of the world's land surface, they contain more than 50% of the world's species of plants and animals. But the rain forests serve as more than just a home to these species; they also play a vital role in cooling the Earth, supplying oxygen for the planet and providing medicines. To learn more about the rain forest, use direct links on The Times Launch Point Web site: http://www.latimes.com/launchpoint/
WORLD
January 25, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
Brazil will combat rising deforestation in the Amazon by sending additional federal police officers and environmental agents to areas where illegal clearing of the rain forest rose dramatically last year, officials said. Authorities will monitor the areas in an attempt to prevent anyone from planting crops or raising cattle there, Environment Minister Marina Silva said. The new measures were announced after President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva called an emergency Cabinet meeting because new data showed an apparent reversal of a three-year slowdown in the Amazon deforestation rate.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 4, 1996 | REGINA HONG
With the help of Ventura and Los Angeles county agencies, a local artist has devised an art program geared to teaching deaf elementary school kids about the rain forest. Beginning Feb. 15, an artist who goes by the name VET will conduct eight consecutive Saturday sessions where she will teach students how to use scraps and recycled products to create objects such as jumping frogs and butterflies, to let deaf children understand "how important the [rain forest] is for our survival on this planet."
NEWS
September 6, 1992 | LINDA FELDMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Rosita Gottlieb sees herself, first and foremost, as a global citizen. Gottlieb is an artist. For two years she has been preparing for an exhibition of her oil paintings called "The Rainforest Series," with part of the proceeds going to the Rainforest Action Network. The paintings are her memories of her native Costa Rica. "I wanted to show the beauty of Costa Rica's rain forest because the country truly values it," she said in an interview at her studio in Marina del Rey.
WORLD
August 23, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
Peru's Congress voted to repeal two laws facilitating the sale of Indian lands that had generated protests by dozens of tribes in the Amazon rain forest. The laws were passed by presidential decree this year to promote private investment in tribal lands of the South American nation. Thousands of Indians celebrated the lawmakers' decision in the main plaza of Bagua, a Peruvian jungle city where protesters clashed with police this week.
OPINION
August 27, 2013 | By Tom Smith
Cameroon, located on the west coast of Africa between Nigeria and Equatorial Guinea, is a nation of unparalleled beauty and biological diversity. Mt. Cameroon, in the west, is one of Africa's largest volcanoes, reaching 13,255 feet; in the north of the country, savanna and semi-desert extend to Lake Chad; and in the south, lush tropical rain forests form the northwestern boundary of the Congo basin. Similar in size to California, Cameroon is one of the most biodiverse countries in Africa, home to more than 900 species of birds and 300 species of mammals (including more than 29 primate species)
TRAVEL
June 23, 2013 | By Rosemary McClure
JUNEAU, Alaska - I'd been told she'd had a little work done. Who can blame her? She was turning 50, and her life had been hard. The miles were starting to show. But after an $8-million update, she was as good as new and ready to celebrate - and I got to join the party. Meet the Malaspina: Fifty years ago she made the voyage that launched the Alaska Marine Highway System, a ferry network that opened the state's isolated coastal towns to tourism and gave residents easier access to the outside world.
SCIENCE
May 31, 2013 | By Geoffrey Mohan
Deforestaton is propeling fast changes in evolution, a study of the Brazilian rain forest suggests. Researchers found that in areas where populations of large-billed, fruit-eating birds, such as toucans, have been driven out because of deforestation, palm trees have evolved to produce smaller and less successful seeds. The Brazilian scientists collected more than 9,000 seeds from 22 palm populations in patches of rain forest that had been fragmented by coffee and sugar cane development during the 1800s.
TRAVEL
May 26, 2013 | By Jessica Gelt, Los Angeles Times
BYRON BAY, AUSTRALIA - My face flushed cherry red and my sweat-soaked sundress clung to my body. I stood, elated, on a wooden platform at the summit of Mt. Warning, a jagged peak in the Gondwana rain forest. The mountain, in the far northeastern corner of New South Wales, Australia, bears witness to the first flicker of sunlight on the continent. By the time I reached it, however, the sun was setting and fog had crept in. Dappled twilight pierced the mist, affording glimpses of the vast subtropical valley below, and the buzz of cicadas filled the air. This dreamscape was just one stop in a series of excursions I had arranged to take from the relaxed beach town of Byron Bay during a nine-day stay in mid-December.
NEWS
May 6, 2013 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Deal and Travel Blogger
If you've ever longed to go on an expedition to Antarctica or the Arctic, Alaska or Mexico , Lindblad Expeditions-National Geographic is offering free airfare on selected small-ship voyages for a limited time. The offer is good for more than a dozen itineraries that take you away for a week or as long as a month. The deal: Free airfare covers flights from gateway cities to destinations where trips with guides and naturalists begin. Here are some examples: The eight-day Journeys in the Sea of Cortez leaving Dec. 14 includes free round-trip airfare from L.A. to Los Cabos, Mexico.
SCIENCE
April 5, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn
NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory may be most famous for sending Curiosity to Mars and Voyager  to the edge of the solar system, but some of its coolest technology is being used right here on Earth. For the last month, a manned C-20A aircraft owned by NASA has been flying a powerful imaging radar system built and managed by JPL over the Americas to collect data on glacier activity, map the coastal mangroves in Latin America, study tiny changes in the Earth's surface caused by the movement of magna beneath active volcanoes, help scientists and government agencies figure out how to improve the levees in New Orleans and the Mississippi Delta, and look for evidence of a 2,000-year-old lost civilization in the Peruvian desert.  The radar's unweildy name is the Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar, but it goes by UAVSAR.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 30, 2009 | Associated Press
Walt Disney Studios is turning box-office cash from its nature documentary "Earth" into seed money to plant trees in the rain forest. Disney had announced it would plant one tree in Brazil's endangered Atlantic rain forest for every viewer who saw the movie during its first week. According to Disney, the box-office tally hit $16.1 million, which translates to 2.7 million trees. The trees are being planted by the Nature Conservancy, which is trying to reforest 2.5 million acres in the rain forest.
NEWS
November 27, 1994 | ERIN J. AUBRY
When Felicia Fisher decided last year to relocate her fine furniture restoration and manufacturing business to the Crenshaw district, friends in the industry issued dire predictions. "They didn't think it was feasible," recalled Fisher. "They said the community just couldn't support this kind of thing." A year later, Fisher is having the last laugh. Rain Forest, at 4521 Jefferson Blvd. in an industrial area east of La Brea Avenue, is thriving.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 15, 2013 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
New music in Manila is a too-little-looked-at phenomenon. We've been missing something. For a Monday Evening Concerts program, built around the U.S. premieres of works by two Philippine composers, Zipper Concert Hall became, in Jonas Baes' "Patangis-Buwaya," a rain forest. The sounds made by a quartet of low winds and whistles and stones handed out to the audience were so uncannily authentic that all that was said to be missing were the mosquitoes. But the big piece of the night, José Maceda's "Strata," proved an even more peculiar sonic and spiritual wonder.
TRAVEL
November 4, 2012 | By David Kelly
TIKAL NATIONAL PARK, Guatemala - The woman in the shorts shrieked, grabbed her ankle and crumpled to the ground as though she'd been shot. And in a sense she had. "A bullet ant," surmised José Elias, our unflappable guide. "If they sting you, the pain will last 24 hours. Take care. " We left the stricken woman to her friends and plunged deeper into Guatemala's steamy jungle. Birds sang madly, chaotically. Emerald billed toucans alighted in the treetops. The spooky cry of a howler monkey echoed through the forest.
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