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NEWS
August 14, 1994 | JOANNA M. MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The often dry and wind-swept landscapes of the Channel Islands seem an unlikely training ground for a woman charged with protecting the lush rain forests of eastern Brazil. But through an exchange program hosted by wildlife biologists in Ventura, Maria Elisa Castellanos Sola will take home valuable tips to help her manage the endangered and disappearing jungles in the state of Minas Gerais.
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NEWS
November 26, 2000 | MICHAEL ASTOR, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Depending on who's talking, Wanderlino Medeiros Bastos is either the Atlantic rain forest's worst nightmare or its last best hope. A coffee grower from Espirito Santo state, Bastos moved into this densely forested region five years ago intent on converting its failing cocoa plantations to coffee. Today he sells seedlings and dispenses agricultural advice from his 1,111-acre showpiece farm at the edge of a highway 500 miles northeast of Rio de Janeiro.
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NEWS
February 17, 1991 | PETER MUELLO, ASSOCIATED PRESS
When the fierce Kayapo Indians meet Darrell Posey, an American anthropologist, they cover their eyes and weep. The ritual weeping is the greatest compliment Kayapo warriors can pay an outsider. It symbolizes the grief of separation from a respected member of the tribe. "It's a long wail and goes on and on," said Posey, 42, one of few whites the Kayapos hold in such high regard. "I get goose bumps just thinking of it." Posey, from Henderson, Ky.
NEWS
August 14, 1994 | JOANNA M. MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The often dry and wind-swept landscapes of the Channel Islands seem an unlikely training ground for a woman charged with protecting the lush rain forests of eastern Brazil. But through an exchange program hosted by wildlife biologists in Ventura, Maria Elisa Castellanos Sola will take home valuable tips to help her manage the endangered and disappearing jungles in the state of Minas Gerais.
NEWS
November 26, 2000 | MICHAEL ASTOR, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Depending on who's talking, Wanderlino Medeiros Bastos is either the Atlantic rain forest's worst nightmare or its last best hope. A coffee grower from Espirito Santo state, Bastos moved into this densely forested region five years ago intent on converting its failing cocoa plantations to coffee. Today he sells seedlings and dispenses agricultural advice from his 1,111-acre showpiece farm at the edge of a highway 500 miles northeast of Rio de Janeiro.
BUSINESS
March 3, 1989 | From Reuters
Japan will not fund construction of the final segment of a controversial highway through the Amazon rain forests in Brazil, Sen. Robert W. Kasten Jr. (R-Wis.) said today. Kasten said he has received assurances from Japan's ambassador to the United States, Nobou Matsunaga, that Japan would not fund the highway, known as BR-364. Many environmentalists oppose the project because they fear it will harm the rain forest.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 1991 | DAVID J. FOX
"Star Trek" fans rushed out to see Paramount's latest in the series over the weekend, buying $18.1 million in tickets. Overall, ticket sales were brisk for the Top 5 movies, but there was a sharp fall-off after that. 20th Century Fox's major holiday feature, "For the Boys," lingered in sixth place for a second week, grossing a disappointing $9.8 million in 12 days of wide release.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 1, 1990
Five rare birds were stolen from the San Diego Zoo in the third such animal theft in 16 months. Three golden conures and two hyacinth macaws, both parrot species, were taken from the zoo's avian propagation center, said Jeff Jouett, a zoo spokesman. The birds, native to the Amazon River rain forests in Brazil, all were hatched at the zoo in the past year. They are worth more than $20,000, Jouett said. A keeper arriving for work discovered the birds missing.
MAGAZINE
January 6, 1991 | TAMAR MAHSHIGIAN
IF YOU'RE TEMPTED to throw away the next batch of catalogues you receive, look closely first. You may have been sent a relatively new catalogue that markets Soviet and Eastern European goods, some of which have been virtually impossible to get in the United States. Russian Dressing items include 1 1/2-inch chunks of the Berlin Wall ($9.50), the album of classic hits that Paul McCartney released exclusively for sale back in the U.S.S.R.
NEWS
September 4, 2012 | By Jeff Spurrier
In the Long Beach community of Carmelitos, Richie Huang's gardener father has positioned little protective paper hats over the ripening bitter melon. Even though this is a sun-loving tropical vine that grows like a vigorous cucumber and is a member of the same botanical family, bitter melon can get damaged by the sun. Immature gourds taste best, but the Huangs also cook with the leaves. Linda Huang, Richie's wife, said they add the leaves as a final step in cooking soup, as you might do with spinach.
NEWS
February 17, 1991 | PETER MUELLO, ASSOCIATED PRESS
When the fierce Kayapo Indians meet Darrell Posey, an American anthropologist, they cover their eyes and weep. The ritual weeping is the greatest compliment Kayapo warriors can pay an outsider. It symbolizes the grief of separation from a respected member of the tribe. "It's a long wail and goes on and on," said Posey, 42, one of few whites the Kayapos hold in such high regard. "I get goose bumps just thinking of it." Posey, from Henderson, Ky.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 1, 1990
Zoo Deaths--Among the apparent victims of last week's heat wave were two golden lion tamarins, an endangered species of monkey, at the Santa Ana Zoo. According to zoo director Claudia Collier, one of the animals was discovered dead in its cage late Tuesday. Although some modifications were made to the enclosure to help ward off the 100-degree-plus heat, the second tamarin was found dead Wednesday.
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