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Rain Forests Costa Rica

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July 1, 1994 | DOREEN CARVAJAL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the soggy mist of the nursery, Frances Lynn Carpenter's newborns lie content and still below a blanket of dusky topsoil. Thousands of jade-colored seedlings sprout from a crib of wet earth, pushing forward delicate leaves like butterfly wings. Carpenter squats to the ground to finger the thin, tender shoot of a freshly germinated tropical tree. She admires its fullness. She pictures it fully grown. She dreams of seeds rising up and saving the world--in a tall way.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 7, 1995 | MIMI KO CRUZ
It looks like a parking meter and it eats money like one, but the new contraption unveiled Wednesday at the Fullerton Arboretum has a loftier purpose. Visitors to the 22-acre garden at Cal State Fullerton will be asked to insert nickels, dimes and quarters in the meter. The money will be donated to organizations trying to save a Costa Rican rain forest. Arboretum officials say they hope to raise $3,000 to $4,000 a year.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 7, 1995 | MIMI KO CRUZ
It looks like a parking meter and it eats money like one, but the new contraption unveiled Wednesday at the Fullerton Arboretum has a loftier purpose. Visitors to the 22-acre garden at Cal State Fullerton will be asked to insert nickels, dimes and quarters in the meter. The money will be donated to organizations trying to save a Costa Rican rain forest. Arboretum officials say they hope to raise $3,000 to $4,000 a year.
NEWS
July 1, 1994 | DOREEN CARVAJAL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the soggy mist of the nursery, Frances Lynn Carpenter's newborns lie content and still below a blanket of dusky topsoil. Thousands of jade-colored seedlings sprout from a crib of wet earth, pushing forward delicate leaves like butterfly wings. Carpenter squats to the ground to finger the thin, tender shoot of a freshly germinated tropical tree. She admires its fullness. She pictures it fully grown. She dreams of seeds rising up and saving the world--in a tall way.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 1997 | J. J. POPE
Erin Lewis, a 16-year-old junior at Foothill High School, was one of 64 middle and high school students nationwide to study tropical environments in the rain forests of Costa Rica under a special program through Duke University. Lewis was part of a smaller group that studied threatened animal and plant species in the rain forests. She was selected for Duke's Talent Identification Program because of her ongoing interest in science and research.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 13, 1991 | KRIS LINDGREN
Four Cal State Fullerton professors have snared grants and contracts totaling nearly $70,000 for studies ranging from the health effects of air pollution to the relationship of fruit-eating fish and fig trees in Costa Rica, university officials announced. Economics professor Jane V. Hall was awarded a $24,249 contract by the South Coast Air Quality Management District to study how adverse health effects caused by air pollution are distributed in society.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 1991 | JACI D. ANTRAM
Dances, lectures, slide shows and exhibits from around the world will be featured beginning Monday at the 12th annual World Culture Festival at College of the Canyons. The festival, which will continue through March 22, is free to the public. Foreign languages teacher Elfi Hummel has organized the event since it began as a 35-minute film presentation. The festival has grown to 26 events this year.
NEWS
November 29, 2010 | By Rosemary McClure, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Rev up the engine and hit the road with “ Drives of a Lifetime: 500 of the World’s Most Spectacular Trips,” a new coffee-table book from National Geographic ($40, hardcover) that explores highways and byways around the globe.  Some of the trips are long-distance odysseys on the far side of the planet, such as the Silk Road across the vastness of central Asia. Many are easy drives for Californians , such as the Gold Rush trail along the rolling foothills of the Sierra Nevada, and California Highway 1 along the rugged coastline of the Big Sur region.
NEWS
July 2, 1994 | DOREEN CARVAJAL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the price of almost $1,495, volunteers are paying to save the rain forests of Costa Rica. The work is unglamorous, gritty and occasionally so monotonousness that excitement is watching the trees grow. No matter. If you grow them, they will come. The newest summer crop of paying volunteers is reporting for tree-measuring duty today at the Coto Brus farm of UC Irvine ecology professor Frances Lynn Carpenter.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 22, 1990 | HERBERT J. VIDA
Mission Viejo/Saddleback Valley Elks Lodge 2444 was named an All-American Lodge by the Elks Grand Lodge at its recent convention in Las Vegas. Only six lodges out of 2,400 nationally received the honor. Former Tustin residents Vera and Andrew Billings entered the Lake Forest Nursing Center in El Toro by wheelchair to attend a party celebrating their 67th wedding anniversary.
NEWS
December 14, 1989 | JAMES F. SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Latin America's huge foreign debt, a crushing burden in every country, has brought a Midas-like windfall for nature conservation in three small nations seeking to protect their tropical rain forests. Ecuador, Costa Rica and Bolivia have swapped tiny portions of their debts for foreign investment in environmental projects, most of them aimed at saving the region's jungle areas.
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