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Rain Forests Ecuador

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 5, 1995
Three protesters scaled the 35-story Texaco building early Thursday and unfurled a huge banner accusing the oil giant of destroying Ecuadorean rain forests. Roughly two-dozen members of the Rainforest Action Network picketed outside the building at Universal City Plaza to urge consumers to boycott the company's products until it restores areas devastated by oil drilling in the South American country. "We're trying to get the word out to U.S.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 5, 1995
Three protesters scaled the 35-story Texaco building early Thursday and unfurled a huge banner accusing the oil giant of destroying Ecuadorean rain forests. Roughly two-dozen members of the Rainforest Action Network picketed outside the building at Universal City Plaza to urge consumers to boycott the company's products until it restores areas devastated by oil drilling in the South American country. "We're trying to get the word out to U.S.
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NEWS
December 14, 1989 | JAMES F. SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Latin America's huge foreign debt, a crushing burden in every country, has brought a Midas-like windfall for nature conservation in three small nations seeking to protect their tropical rain forests. Ecuador, Costa Rica and Bolivia have swapped tiny portions of their debts for foreign investment in environmental projects, most of them aimed at saving the region's jungle areas.
TRAVEL
April 6, 1986 | JUDY SATIN, Satin is an Alhambra free-lance writer.
When my husband turned 30 a couple of years ago, he thought he needed to do something to convince himself that he was still as adventuresome as he was at 20. I agreed to help when he selected nude sunbathing. I now have a thing for sunbathing in the nude. I also have a thing for not playing volleyball or cooking chili that way. We used to have two choices: to sunbathe quietly at home or go to a nudist club and weather the humiliation of playing boccie ball in the altogether.
SPORTS
October 30, 1998 | ROBYN NORWOOD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Back deep to return the punt for Washington, No. 21, Joe Jarzynka. Into the lineup at H-back for the Huskies, No. 21. . . . In to kick the field goal. . . . Deep to receive the kickoff. . . . On for the extra point. . . . No. 21 will be everywhere Saturday at the Coliseum, so get used to it. Jarzynka is a 5-foot-7, 175-pound former walk-on who has become the Huskies' one-man special team.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 23, 2004 | Teresa Wiltz, Washington Post
Well, she didn't win the spoken-word Grammy Award -- that went to Al Franken (for "Lies and the Lying Liars Who Tell Them"). Then there's the NAACP Image Award coming up in March, which she's also positively positive she won't win. Her competitors? Toni Morrison and Alice Walker. Not going to happen, not in a million years. That's fine with her. She's just happy to be nominated, to show up and sparkle, sparkle, sparkle. But the bat -- that's hers and hers alone.
NEWS
July 31, 1992 | ROSE-MARIE TURK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As he flew to Malcolm Forbes' 1989 birthday bash in Morocco, New York interior designer Mario Buatta did what his tailor didn't have time to do. He sewed antique brass buttons on his new Ralph Lauren blazer. For Buatta--and millions of American consumers--buttons count. They are the detail that can turn almost any garment into a gem, miniature sculptures that give signals about the wearer and the designer. What's more, in these tight economic times, buttons have new significance.
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