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October 8, 1991 | DAVID COLKER and TRACEY KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The environmental artist Christo, poised to unveil at dawn today his gigantic work featuring 3,100 umbrellas at sites in Japan and the Tejon Pass, has postponed it indefinitely because of heavy rains at the Japan site. "I do not feel any pleasure in opening my umbrellas in the present miserable weather" in the Ibaraki Prefecture, 75 miles north of Tokyo, Christo said in a statement issued Monday night in Japan, which is 16 hours ahead of Los Angeles time.
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NEWS
October 8, 1991 | DAVID COLKER and TRACEY KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The environmental artist Christo, poised to unveil at dawn today his gigantic work featuring 3,100 umbrellas at sites in Japan and the Tejon Pass, has postponed it indefinitely because of heavy rains at the Japan site. "I do not feel any pleasure in opening my umbrellas in the present miserable weather" in the Ibaraki Prefecture, 75 miles north of Tokyo, Christo said in a statement issued Monday night in Japan, which is 16 hours ahead of Los Angeles time.
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NEWS
July 4, 1990 | Associated Press
Floods and landslides in four days of heavy rain have killed 24 people and injured 26 others on Japan's southernmost main island of Kyushu, the National Police Agency said Tuesday. Three others were missing. Weather officials said 22.4 inches of rain fell in Kumamoto between Friday and 6 a.m. Tuesday.
NEWS
July 4, 1990 | Associated Press
Floods and landslides in four days of heavy rain have killed 24 people and injured 26 others on Japan's southernmost main island of Kyushu, the National Police Agency said Tuesday. Three others were missing. Weather officials said 22.4 inches of rain fell in Kumamoto between Friday and 6 a.m. Tuesday.
SPORTS
June 26, 1987 | From Times Wire Services
Defending champion Martina Navratilova beat the rain and Japan's Etsuko Inoue to become the first player to reach the third round and the only player to finish a match Thursday at the All England Club. With a backlog of almost two days' worth of singles matches, 44 players had yet to complete the first round. Even Navratilova said the weather was affecting her style. "I don't think I rushed to get the match over with, but I did rush in between the points. . . .
SPORTS
April 24, 1989 | From Associated Press
Conchita Martinez, a 17-year-old from Spain who did not have a computer ranking a year ago, upset top-seeded Gabriela Sabatini of Argentina, 6-3, 6-2, Sunday to win the $200,000 Eckerd Tennis Open at Largo, Fla. Martinez, seeded eighth, whose only previous tournament championships were in satellite events, did not lose a set during the tournament. Martinez never trailed. She broke Sabatini in each of her first three service games and built a 5-2 first-set lead. After Sabatini held, cutting it to 5-3, Martinez struggled to close out the set. She had three set points, but made errors on each one. Finally, on Martinez's fourth opportunity, Sabatini slammed a forehand long.
SPORTS
November 24, 2006 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Michelle Wie missed the cut for the 11th time in 12 professional men's events today after a nervous 80 left her at 17 over par at the Casio World Open in Kochi, Japan. The Honolulu schoolgirl had faced a nearly impossible task after equaling her worst score in a men's event with a nine-over 81 in freezing rain on Japan's Shikoku island on Thursday.
SPORTS
March 19, 2006 | Tim Brown, Times Staff Writer
Japan had lost three times in the World Baseball Classic, twice, bitterly, to Korea. But, in a tournament it has found to be forgiving, Japan will play Cuba in Monday night's final after beating Korea, 6-0, in a semifinal game Saturday night at Petco Park. Japan and Korea, baseball rivals along the lines of Yankees-Red Sox, with a cultural rivalry that runs much deeper, played for the third time, in the third ballpark, in less than two weeks.
NEWS
January 29, 2000 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two years after the Kyoto accord on global warming, most of the major industrial powers and developing countries are emitting more greenhouse gases than ever. Still, U.S. and Japanese officials say there has been incremental progress on diplomatic and technological fronts toward convincing many countries that it is possible and essential to cut carbon dioxide emissions by 2010 to below levels a decade ago--the goal set in Kyoto.
SPORTS
April 14, 1989 | SHAV GLICK, Times Staff Writer
In six years of motorcycle racing at its highest level--the world 500cc road racing series--Eddie Lawson of Upland won championships in 1984, 1986 and 1988 riding a Yamaha. During the off-season, in one of the most startling switches in cycling history, Lawson took his No. 1 plate and moved to Yamaha's bitter rival, Honda. Sunday, in the Dunlop United States International Grand Prix at Laguna Seca, Lawson will be trying to win his first trophy in three races on the Honda to go alongside the one he won in the same race last year on a Yamaha.
NEWS
July 16, 1989 | LARRY B. STAMMER, Times Environmental Writer
When leaders of the world's seven leading industrial nations conclude their economic summit in Paris today, they are expected to issue a strong statement on the need for international cooperation to protect the global environment.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 1999 | MARY McNAMARA, Mary McNamara is a Times staff writer
Musicians make music to fill a need. To create a sound that is not already there, to capture a feeling, to move hearts, minds and bodies. But first comes the instrument, and the instrument maker. As it turns out, they work to fill the same need and more: to preserve a tradition, to teach, to perfect the harmony of tool, process and result. Such is the premise of "Heart and Hands," a photographic tour through an American universe of instrument makers by Jake Jacobson.
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