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Rain Man

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MAGAZINE
June 9, 1996 | Eric Enno Tamm
Richard Margeson is the Maytag repairman of Los Angeles--only hipper. Like the loner on the TV commercials, the 70-year-old Margeson is silver-haired and, today at least, decked out in proletarian navy blue; this being L.A., he also sports a hoop earring in his left lobe. Sitting in a cluttered repair shop on Sunset near Vine one drizzly morning, Margeson is lonely, but not for lack of customers--he runs Los Angeles' only umbrella repair service.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 2014 | By Sheri Linden
Whether she's trysting with her married lover or helping other people die, the title character of "Honey" is a fascinating and complex figure, and Jasmine Trinca inhabits the role with a detached intensity that's thoroughly compelling. The Italian film - the assured feature-directing debut by actress Valeria Golino, still best known to American audiences for "Rain Man" - achieves the rare feat of addressing euthanasia head-on without devolving into a dramatized treatise or a button-pushing issue movie.
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SPORTS
April 18, 2013 | By Steve Dilbeck
It's a new world out there, which Mitt Romney and the 47% could tell you, but some are a little slow to embrace, or at least recognize. This world texts, tweets, Facebooks and records on smartphones. You shouldn't have to be smart to realize this, just breathing in a modern country. If you mess up and are anything close to a public figure, chances are decent you could be trending in a moment. Padres President and Chief Executive Tom Garfinkel was caught supposedly being emotional, and most certainly utterly stupid, and you have to wonder how this all plays out. In a meeting with season ticket holders at Petco Park the day after the Zack Greinke-Carlos Quentin brawl in San Diego, Garfinkel not only accused Greinke of hitting Quentin intentionally, blamed Greinke for breaking his own collarbone by using his shoulder to protect himself and essentially accused Greinke of lying, but mocked Greinke's social-anxiety disorder by implying he was autistic.
SPORTS
April 18, 2013 | By Steve Dilbeck
It's a new world out there, which Mitt Romney and the 47% could tell you, but some are a little slow to embrace, or at least recognize. This world texts, tweets, Facebooks and records on smartphones. You shouldn't have to be smart to realize this, just breathing in a modern country. If you mess up and are anything close to a public figure, chances are decent you could be trending in a moment. Padres President and Chief Executive Tom Garfinkel was caught supposedly being emotional, and most certainly utterly stupid, and you have to wonder how this all plays out. In a meeting with season ticket holders at Petco Park the day after the Zack Greinke-Carlos Quentin brawl in San Diego, Garfinkel not only accused Greinke of hitting Quentin intentionally, blamed Greinke for breaking his own collarbone by using his shoulder to protect himself and essentially accused Greinke of lying, but mocked Greinke's social-anxiety disorder by implying he was autistic.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 19, 1989 | DENNIS HUNT, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
"Rain Man" is certainly raining on "Beaches." If it weren't for "Rain Man," which continues its reign as the most popular rental on the Billboard chart, "Beaches"--a perennial No. 2--probably would have been No. 1 by now. But "Beaches" may not reach No. 1 and may be washed out of the Top Five by the new wave of hot rentals released in the last two weeks. Two films with Top Five potential entered the chart this week: "Major League" (No.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 1989 | NINA J. EASTON, Times Staff Writer
Look around at the audiences pouring into theaters to see "Rain Man," Hollywood's hottest film: If MGM/UA's research results are on target, most of them will be women and a lot of those women will be over 25. For years, a Hollywood rule of thumb has held that blockbuster movies need to draw most of their audience from the young male crowd--teens who bring along dates or groups of friends, and consider repeat viewings as a kind of pubescent badge of honor.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 14, 1989 | DENNIS HUNT, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
"Beaches," the tear-jerker box-office hit starring Bette Midler and Barbara Hershey, roared up the Billboard magazine rental chart to No. 4 in just two weeks. It has an outside chance of making No. 1 next week. A rise to No. 2 is more likely. "Bill and Ted's Excellent Adventure" was a box-office surprise, raking in more than $39 million.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 1989 | NINA J. EASTON, Times Staff Writer
MGM/UA's decision to jump the gun by running an advertisement touting "Rain Man" as an Academy Award nominee before the nominations were officially announced has prompted a complaint from academy President Richard Kahn. "We regard this as a serious matter and we have communicated our concern to (the studio)," Kahn said in a prepared statement Friday, without providing further details.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 1989 | NINA J. EASTON, Times Staff Writer
Only 79 people, all members of the Hollywood Foreign Press Assn. and all unknown to the American public, decide who will receive Golden Globe awards. In the coming months, 4,632 members of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences--hundreds of them with names indelibly linked to Hollywood in the minds of moviegoers--will cast their votes for the coveted Oscars. But the foreign press members seem to have an almost unerring instinct for signaling the films that go on to win Academy Awards.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 1989
In reference to Mrs. F.M. Snowden's March 26 letter charging that the "Rain Man" company has not supported the effort against autism: It is true that the L.A. premiere of "Rain Man" did not benefit an autism-related organization; instead it aided Camp Ronald McDonald for Good Times, an organization for children with cancer and other handicaps. However, I am compelled to point out some of the many efforts all of us involved with the film have made on behalf of autism. Benefit premieres were held in West Virginia (for Autism Services Center)
SPORTS
May 3, 2012 | Times staff
Mark Walter Born in Iowa, Walter, 51, went to Creighton University and Northwestern University Law School. His net worth is estimated to be $1.3 billion. Most of Walter's fortune derives from his stake in Guggenheim Partners, a 12-year-old firm founded with family money by a descendant of mining magnate Meyer Guggenheim. Magic Johnson Arguably the greatest Laker of all time, Johnson, 52, is not expected to have a major decision-making role in terms of player personnel, but will be the public face of the franchise.
SPORTS
March 28, 2012 | By Steve Zeitchik
Peter Guber is bringing some Hollywood flash, and drama, to the Dodgers. A longtime player in film and television, Guber, 70, has had a hand in some of the best-known movies of the last four decades — including "Batman," "Rain Man" and "Midnight Express" — but also has a checkered record, stemming primarily from his troubled tenure as head of Sony Pictures. Guber and Magic Johnson have joined forces before, including on the Dayton, Ohio, single-A affiliate of the Cincinnati Reds, which they continue to own. Guber also once owned the Dodgers' triple-A affiliate when it was located in Las Vegas.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 24, 2009
Ann Nixon Cooper Mentioned in Obama's election night speech Ann Nixon Cooper, 107, the Atlanta centenarian lauded by President Obama in his election night speech last year, died Monday at her Atlanta home. Carl M. Williams Funeral Directors of Atlanta confirmed the death. In his 2008 speech, Obama called Cooper an example of "the heartbreak and the hope" of the last century. He noted that she was born at a time when women and blacks couldn't vote and lived to cast her ballot for the country's first black president.
MAGAZINE
May 1, 2005
The article about Billy Cottrell ("Burned," by Vince Beiser, April 10) is very upsetting. It is incredible that an American judge would withhold from the jury the fact that a defendant has Asperger's syndrome. His condition would have prevented him from assessing the criminal aspect of his actions. But because his form of autism was not known to the jury, he was found guilty. From what we know about his early school days, serving time side by side with other convicts does not bode well for him. This brilliant scientific "Rain Man" should be allowed to do research rather than languish in prison.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 1999 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Over four years in development, the CBS movie "Behind the Mask" is based on a story that appeared in The Times in 1994, chronicling a difficult but ultimately rewarding relationship between Dr. Robert Shushan, the director of a center for the mentally disabled, and James Jones, a client at the center. If that brief description calls up recollections of "Bill" or "Rain Man," it's not surprising, because the subject matter is clearly similar.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 15, 1997
The British Academy of Film and Television Arts Los Angeles will present its seventh annual Britannia Award to actor Dustin Hoffman during a Sept. 24 black-tie gala at the Regent Beverly Wilshire. Tony Bennett will perform at the event, and filmmaker Barry Levinson, who directed Hoffman's Oscar-winning performance in "Rain Man," will present the award. Actor-comedian Billy Connolly will serve as master of ceremonies.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 1989 | DENNIS HUNT, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
The surprise of the week is that "Rain Man"--the mighty Oscar winner and the box-office champ of 1988--isn't yet No. 1 on the Billboard magazine rental chart. In its second week on the chart, "Rain Man" rose two notches to No. 4, a bit disappointing for a film everyone expected to instantly zoom to the top of the chart. If "Rain Man" doesn't make it to the top in the next two weeks, maybe its rental appeal was overestimated. "Tequila Sunrise" (No. 1) is a much bigger rental hit than expected.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 26, 1989 | DENNIS HUNT, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
The Top Five of the Billboard magazine rental chart has a new look, with two new entries--"Working Girl" (No. 3) and "Major League" (No. 4)--poised to wash "Rain Man" out of No. 1. The two heavy dramas--"Rain Man" and "Beaches"--that have dominated the rental chart in recent weeks, look like they will be bounced out of the Top Five in the next month, with the more fun films taking over. "The Dream Team," Michael Keaton's new comedy, jumped nine places to No.
MAGAZINE
June 9, 1996 | Eric Enno Tamm
Richard Margeson is the Maytag repairman of Los Angeles--only hipper. Like the loner on the TV commercials, the 70-year-old Margeson is silver-haired and, today at least, decked out in proletarian navy blue; this being L.A., he also sports a hoop earring in his left lobe. Sitting in a cluttered repair shop on Sunset near Vine one drizzly morning, Margeson is lonely, but not for lack of customers--he runs Los Angeles' only umbrella repair service.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 26, 1995 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The top man in Los Angeles weather circles doesn't have a degree in meteorology. He doesn't even have one of those fancy Doppler radar screens on his desk to watch for incoming storm clouds. Lu Rarogiewicz doesn't need any of that stuff. All he has to do is step outside his house next to Weathervane Drive atop Mt. Wilson and stick out his hand. If he can see his fingertips through the clouds, that's a good wintertime sign at his lonely weather post more than a mile above Los Angeles.
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