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November 8, 1991 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The three dump trucks were painted bright orange, blue and yellow, but their grisly cargo was anything but jolly: dozens of bloated, blackened and battered bodies piled high. In the nearby public cemetery, victims of Tuesday's flash floods were heaped naked in the mud, awaiting burial in mass graves. Numbed survivors, holding their noses from the stench of death, searched for loved ones. Others wept as they dug shallow graves for bodies shrouded only in banana leaves or mats.
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NEWS
November 8, 1991 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The three dump trucks were painted bright orange, blue and yellow, but their grisly cargo was anything but jolly: dozens of bloated, blackened and battered bodies piled high. In the nearby public cemetery, victims of Tuesday's flash floods were heaped naked in the mud, awaiting burial in mass graves. Numbed survivors, holding their noses from the stench of death, searched for loved ones. Others wept as they dug shallow graves for bodies shrouded only in banana leaves or mats.
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NEWS
November 7, 1991 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than 2,300 people were reported killed and tens of thousands left homeless after a tropical storm triggered deadly flash floods and mudslides in the central Philippines, relief officials said Wednesday. Officials said the death toll from Tuesday's Tropical Storm Thelma is likely to grow substantially. At least 1,500 people were missing and feared dead. "We believe there will be many more dead," said Lourdes Masing, director of disaster preparation and relief for the Philippine Red Cross.
NEWS
November 8, 1991 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The three dump trucks were painted bright orange, blue and yellow, but their grisly cargo was anything but jolly: dozens of bloated, blackened and battered bodies piled high. In the nearby public cemetery, victims of Tuesday's flash floods were heaped naked in the mud, awaiting burial in mass graves. Numbed survivors, holding their noses from the stench of death, searched for loved ones. Others wept as they dug shallow graves for bodies shrouded only in banana leaves or mats.
NEWS
November 8, 1991 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The three dump trucks were painted bright orange, blue and yellow, but their grisly cargo was anything but jolly: dozens of bloated, blackened and battered bodies piled high. In the nearby public cemetery, victims of Tuesday's flash floods were heaped naked in the mud, awaiting burial in mass graves. Numbed survivors, holding their noses from the stench of death, searched for loved ones. Others wept as they dug shallow graves for bodies shrouded only in banana leaves or mats.
NEWS
June 20, 1991 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hard-pressed Philippine officials stepped up rescue and relief efforts Wednesday amid growing fears of disastrous mudslides from millions of tons of rocks and ash that rained down during last weekend's devastating eruption of Mt. Pinatubo. Scientists estimate that the massive eruption pumped out substantially more ash and rock than did Mt. St. Helens' explosion 11 years ago in Washington state, dropping unstable volcanic debris more than 1,000 feet thick on parts of the volcano's steep slopes.
NEWS
November 7, 1991 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than 2,300 people were reported killed and tens of thousands left homeless after a tropical storm triggered deadly flash floods and mudslides in the central Philippines, relief officials said Wednesday. Officials said the death toll from Tuesday's Tropical Storm Thelma is likely to grow substantially. At least 1,500 people were missing and feared dead. "We believe there will be many more dead," said Lourdes Masing, director of disaster preparation and relief for the Philippine Red Cross.
NEWS
June 20, 1991 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hard-pressed Philippine officials stepped up rescue and relief efforts Wednesday amid growing fears of disastrous mudslides from millions of tons of rocks and ash that rained down during last weekend's devastating eruption of Mt. Pinatubo. Scientists estimate that the massive eruption pumped out substantially more ash and rock than did Mt. St. Helens' explosion 11 years ago in Washington state, dropping unstable volcanic debris more than 1,000 feet thick on parts of the volcano's steep slopes.
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