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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Flash floods that inundated portions of Southern California on Thursday prompted evacuations in a San Bernardino County mountain hamlet and destroyed a stretch of highway, flooded 20 homes and washed away a park ranger's house in the Kern County community of Ridgecrest, authorities said. Sudden pounding rains and golf-ball-size hail fueled a powerful mudflow that surged through Forest Falls in the San Bernardino National Forest about 6 p.m.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Flash floods that inundated portions of Southern California on Thursday prompted evacuations in a San Bernardino County mountain hamlet and destroyed a stretch of highway, flooded 20 homes and washed away a park ranger's house in the Kern County community of Ridgecrest, authorities said. Sudden pounding rains and golf-ball-size hail fueled a powerful mudflow that surged through Forest Falls in the San Bernardino National Forest about 6 p.m.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 27, 2008 | Molly Hennessy-Fiske
Scattered showers have caused flooding in some parts of the Inland Empire, leading to at least one fatality and prompting officials to issue a flash flood watch for parts of Riverside and San Bernardino counties, where forecasters expect more rain. A San Bernardino County woman drowned Monday night after her sedan was washed away by fast-moving flood waters on a remote county road. Rosemary Genc, 51, of Big River was attempting to drive her Honda Accord across Rio Vista Road about 9 p.m. when the car was carried away, flipped and submerged in less than three feet of water, said Sandy Fatland, a spokeswoman for the San Bernardino County sheriff's coroner's division.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 24, 2005 | Hector Becerra and Jia-Rui Chong, Times Staff Writers
The near-record rains that drenched Southern California this winter have created conditions for a potentially dangerous fire season as dense vegetation nurtured by the storms dries out. The first major wildfire of the season, a blaze north of Palm Springs that destroyed six homes and a barn, was fueled by much-taller-than-normal hillside chaparral and grasses.
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