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Rainbow Commission On Fairness In The Media

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 26, 1994 | JOHN HURST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Institutional racism is rampant in television and newspapers, the Rev. Jesse Jackson said Saturday in Los Angeles as he announced formation of a commission to do battle with the mass media. The Rainbow Commission on Fairness in the Media will use "research, education, negotiations and boycotts" to combat prejudice in the media, Jackson said at a news conference at the West Angeles Church of God in Christ on South Crenshaw Boulevard.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 26, 1994 | JOHN HURST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Institutional racism is rampant in television and newspapers, the Rev. Jesse Jackson said Saturday in Los Angeles as he announced formation of a commission to do battle with the mass media. The Rainbow Commission on Fairness in the Media will use "research, education, negotiations and boycotts" to combat prejudice in the media, Jackson said at a news conference at the West Angeles Church of God in Christ on South Crenshaw Boulevard.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 26, 1994 | GREG BRAXTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Rev. Jesse Jackson on Monday accused television networks of "institutional racism," and vowed to encourage viewers to boycott networks that refuse to schedule programs with positive ethnic images or do not place minorities in key decision-making positions.
NEWS
September 24, 1994 | GREG BRAXTON and NICHOLAS RICCARDI, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Rev. Jesse Jackson on Friday repeated his attack on the television industry's record of cultural diversity, threatening to punish the networks with viewer boycotts if they do not immediately launch plans to improve the visibility of minorities in front of and behind the camera.
NEWS
July 31, 1994 | ENRIQUE LAVIN
Proclaiming that television networks are "recycling racist practices," the Rev. Jesse Jackson urged South-Central community leaders last week to join him in building an organization to protect minorities' interests in the media.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 1994 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
The Rev. Jesse Jackson last month publicly excoriated television for its lack of cultural diversity, threatening the networks with viewer boycotts if they did not end their "institutional racism." Uh, did he say boycotts? Although most minority group leaders have difficulty denting television's thick corporate curtain, Jackson's rhetoric appears to have a penetrating resonance.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 14, 1995 | GREG BRAXTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Latino actors and producers in the television industry reacted strongly Friday to a proposed viewer boycott of ABC, voicing either full support or at least sympathy for the frustration that led a coalition of organizations to suggest it as a means of getting more Latinos into prime time. "My instinctive feeling is that it's sad that people have to get to this level to get an industry to see a situation that is evident," said actor-director-producer Edward James Olmos.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 8, 1994 | CLAUDIA PUIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The networks didn't want to talk about it Wednesday, but Latino actors and activists and even some television producers did, expressing dismay but not surprise over a new study showing that Latinos accounted for only 1% of all characters in prime-time entertainment programs during the 1992-93 season. "This report just validates all the things we've been saying for years," said Esther Renteria, director of the National Hispanic Media Coalition.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 1995 | GREG BRAXTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The roof may be about to cave in on "Under One Roof." One of the rare network dramas in the last two decades to feature an all-black ensemble cast, "Under One Roof" received largely glowing reviews when it premiered last month on CBS. Critics paid particular tribute to the acting, writing and direction of the series, commending the creators, cast and CBS for depicting a black family in a positive light without the traditional TV trappings of slapstick or caustic one-liners.
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