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Rainbow Family Organization

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NEWS
July 4, 1998 | JULIE CART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Don't be misled by the dope smoking, the incessant drumming, the incense haze and the twirling dancers. This is nothing less than a Constitutional Convention, a referendum on the right to assemble. To many, the 27th Gathering of the Tribes for World Peace and Healing is a freaky, funky, smelly assemblage of anarchists, Druids, tree-worshiping Pagans and latter-day hippies. They call it Weirdstock.
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NEWS
July 4, 1998 | JULIE CART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Don't be misled by the dope smoking, the incessant drumming, the incense haze and the twirling dancers. This is nothing less than a Constitutional Convention, a referendum on the right to assemble. To many, the 27th Gathering of the Tribes for World Peace and Healing is a freaky, funky, smelly assemblage of anarchists, Druids, tree-worshiping Pagans and latter-day hippies. They call it Weirdstock.
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NEWS
August 18, 1991 | WILLIAM COCKERHAM, THE HARTFORD COURANT
On the eve of the summer solstice this year, a child was born in the Green Mountain National Forest in a candle-lit tent miles from the nearest hospital. His mother, Sunshine, named him Forest Moon, the newest member of a loosely knit group called the Rainbow Family that has gathered annually in national forests for 20 years. Hanging on to a flower-child lifestyle that blossomed in the 1960s but wilted in the 1980s, the Rainbows still attract as many as 15,000 people to their reunions.
NEWS
June 30, 1992 | FLORENCE WILLIAMS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"It's a beautiful day in Rainbowland, eh?" says Detour as he enters the Popcorn Palace. Several large blue tarps crowned with flags surround a smoking fire pit. Tony plays "Blackbird" on his guitar and Firestarter cradles Forest Moon, the baby he helped deliver at last year's Rainbow gathering. A half-mile farther through the woods, Hobbit stirs oatmeal at the Quit-Yer-Bitchin'-Love-Light Kitchen. "Welcome home," he says. "Free food, free love, free smoke." This isn't People's Park.
NEWS
June 30, 1992 | FLORENCE WILLIAMS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"It's a beautiful day in Rainbowland, eh?" says Detour as he enters the Popcorn Palace. Several large blue tarps crowned with flags surround a smoking fire pit. Tony plays "Blackbird" on his guitar and Firestarter cradles Forest Moon, the baby he helped deliver at last year's Rainbow gathering. A half-mile farther through the woods, Hobbit stirs oatmeal at the Quit-Yer-Bitchin'-Love-Light Kitchen. "Welcome home," he says. "Free food, free love, free smoke." This isn't People's Park.
NEWS
August 18, 1991 | WILLIAM COCKERHAM, THE HARTFORD COURANT
On the eve of the summer solstice this year, a child was born in the Green Mountain National Forest in a candle-lit tent miles from the nearest hospital. His mother, Sunshine, named him Forest Moon, the newest member of a loosely knit group called the Rainbow Family that has gathered annually in national forests for 20 years. Hanging on to a flower-child lifestyle that blossomed in the 1960s but wilted in the 1980s, the Rainbows still attract as many as 15,000 people to their reunions.
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