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NEWS
March 17, 1993 | BRIDGET BYRNE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"I know why Barry Manilow 'made it through the rain.' He got straight into his limo. He didn't have to walk to the self-park like us," said one joker, as guests leaving the Starlight Foundation gala Saturday night found raindrops falling on their heads. The ball at the Century Plaza Hotel had been a cozy cocoon all evening, warmed by words of friendship, love and support and a slew of sentimental ballads as "The Child in All of Us Gala" honored talk show host Arsenio Hall.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 2, 2012 | By Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
Hal David, the renowned pop music lyricist whose prolific collaboration with composer Burt Bacharach produced a wealth of enduringly memorable hits in the 1960s and early '70s , including "Walk On By," "What the World Needs Now Is Love" and the Oscar-winning "Raindrops Keep Fallin' On My Head," died Saturday in Los Angeles. He was 91. David died at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center of complications from a stroke, according to his wife, Eunice. "As a lyric writer, Hal was simple, concise and poetic - conveying volumes of meaning in the fewest possible words and always in service to the music," songwriter Paul Williams, president of the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers, said in a statement.
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HOME & GARDEN
April 13, 2006 | Emily Green, Times Staff Writer
MY frontyard looked like a storybook American home -- a lavender-lined front walk, two oaks, grass paths, a driveway to the side -- but it was a textbook polluter. The gutter fed directly to the concrete driveway. This swept rain straight from the gutter, onto the driveway, into the street. Rain, it turns out, is only pure until it hits the street.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 1, 2012 | By Gerrick D. Kennedy
Hal David, the lyricist of pop music standards such as "Raindrops Keep Fallin' On My Head" and "(They Long to Be) Close to You" has died. He was 91. David died of complications from a stroke Saturday morning in Los Angeles, according to the Associated Press. David and his longtime partner composer Burt Bacharach etched an indelible footprint on the American songbook when they penned dozens of top 40 hits. WATCH: 10 iconic Hal David songs The two crafted a slew of memorable singles in the 1960s and early 1970s for a range of artists including Dionne Warwick, the Carpenters, Dusty Springfield, Gene Pitney and Tom Jones.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 2001 | ELISE GEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Pacific storm that rolled into the Southland on Sunday afternoon--packing high winds in the mountain passes and rain throughout the Los Angeles Basin--is a precursor to an even stronger storm expected to hit Tuesday, forecasters said. About half an inch of rain is expected to fall through today, according to Weather Central Inc. which provides forecasting services for The Times. The California Highway Patrol closed the Golden State Freeway in the Grapevine area just before 3 p.m.
NEWS
February 15, 1991 | TINA ANIMA and HENRY CHU, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Southlanders hoping to soak up some sun during the three-day weekend may find themselves soaked with raindrops instead. "The three-day weekend should start out kind of wet," said Marty McKewon, a forecaster with WeatherData Inc., which provides weather information for The Times. There's a 30% chance that showers will dampen Orange County streets and the coast Saturday, but the rain should give way to sunshine by Sunday afternoon.
SCIENCE
June 20, 2009 | John Johnson Jr.
The hows and whys of rainfall have been pondered for about as long as human beings have walked upright. Now a research team thinks it has discovered something everyone else missed: Some raindrops fall faster than they should. Curious though it is, the finding could have consequences far beyond inspiring water cooler talk at the National Weather Service.
NEWS
September 24, 1989 | MARY LOU LOPER, Times Staff Writer
Soppy tuxedos, sprinkled designer gowns and wet hair became simply de rigueur at the big black-tie do given by the Childrens Chain of Childrens Hospital. What started out as the most sophisticated of evenings--balmy cocktails on the front lawn of Richard Sobelle's magnificent colonial in Brentwood Park--turned into alarm as raindrops skittered on guests moving to the tennis court for a sit-down dinner by the sculpted 14-foot Eugenia hedge.
SPORTS
December 30, 1985 | MIKE PENNER, Times Staff Writer
Now, the game's directors no longer have to explain that they're not the Independence Bowl or the Liberty Bowl. Now, they can put a Roman numeral next to the name Freedom Bowl. At 5:10 p.m. today, at Anaheim Stadium, Washington and Colorado get together to kick off Freedom Bowl II . By billing alone, that means there has to have been a Freedom Bowl I. And that means the Freedom Bowl now has what every bowl game worth its corporate sponsorship needs--tradition.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 8, 1992 | JAMES M. GOMEZ and MARLA CONE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The relatively weak tropical storm that pushed through drought-stricken Orange County was welcomed by local water officials, who said Friday that they captured millions of gallons of rainwater for the diminished underground water supply.
NEWS
September 1, 2012 | Dennis McLellan
Hal David, the renowned pop music lyricist whose prolific collaboration with composer Burt Bacharachproduced a wealth of enduringly memorable hits in the 1960s and early '70s, including “Walk on By,” “What the World Needs Now Is Love” and “Raindrops Keep Fallin' on My Head,” died Saturday in Los Angeles. He was 91. David died at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center of complications from a stroke, announced his wife, Eunice. Born in Brooklyn, N.Y., David wrote a number of hit songs with other collaborators before teaming with Bacharach in 1956.
SCIENCE
March 30, 2012 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times
Fossilized imprints of raindrops that were sealed into stone 2.7 billion years ago indicate that Earth's early atmosphere could have been packed with greenhouse gases, according to new research that addresses a long-standing paradox of the planet's early history. About 2 billion years ago, the young sun was far less bright, emitting less than 85% of the light and heat it puts out today. With such weak sunlight, Earth should have remained frozen. But ancient water-damaged rocks and algae-like fossils show clear evidence that there was indeed liquid water in the distant past.
SPORTS
April 2, 2010
Southern California gets a few drops of rain, and news stations call it "Storm Watch 2010." Everyone goes crazy. The Lakers are similar to that storm watch. When there are a few drops of rain or — in the Lakers' case —a few losses, the sky is falling. Kind of like the people in SoCal expect sunny weather every day, fans expect the Lakers to win every game. In both cases, it's unrealistic to demand such perfection. Want to see a real storm? Look at New Jersey's weather and then take a look at the Nets' record in the standings.
SCIENCE
June 20, 2009 | John Johnson Jr.
The hows and whys of rainfall have been pondered for about as long as human beings have walked upright. Now a research team thinks it has discovered something everyone else missed: Some raindrops fall faster than they should. Curious though it is, the finding could have consequences far beyond inspiring water cooler talk at the National Weather Service.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 12, 2009 | Ari B. Bloomekatz
To those who know it only by reputation, the Nickerson Gardens housing project in Watts is a forbidding place, plagued by violence and poverty and ruled by African American gangs. So naturally, Father Peter Banks brought 200 Latino parishioners there in December for a posada, a Christmas ritual that re-creates Joseph and Mary's search for a place for Jesus to be born. Banks, pastor of St.
HOME & GARDEN
April 13, 2006 | Emily Green, Times Staff Writer
MY frontyard looked like a storybook American home -- a lavender-lined front walk, two oaks, grass paths, a driveway to the side -- but it was a textbook polluter. The gutter fed directly to the concrete driveway. This swept rain straight from the gutter, onto the driveway, into the street. Rain, it turns out, is only pure until it hits the street.
SPORTS
June 4, 1989 | THOMAS BONK, Times Staff Writer
Maybe Lawson Duncan can find out who stole the sun in one of those detective stories he loves to read. Once again, rain was a winner at the French Open, where the day was not only damp, but colorful. Green tarps were rolled over red clay under a gray sky. Play was interrupted Saturday at Roland Garros for the second consecutive day, but neither wind nor rain nor courts of clay could keep Duncan from his appointed round, which is the round of 16. A rare American clay-court specialist who has never made it past the second round here, Duncan got his match in early and defeated Jerome Potier of France, 6-4, 6-0, 6-4. Duncan, from Asheville, N. C., is ranked 67th in the world and he is 11-4 on clay since May. Andre Agassi's timing was not quite as good as Duncan's.
NEWS
April 2, 1987 | DEAN MURPHY, Times Staff Writer
The distinctive steel framework that six years ago won architectural acclaim for the Port of Los Angeles' headquarters in San Pedro is now a dirty word there. The exposed network of girders, designed to resemble steel cranes in the harbor, has become a cozy roost for hundreds of pigeons oblivious, as pigeons usually are, to where they relieve themselves.
HOME & GARDEN
January 27, 2005 | Robert Smaus
February IS usually our rainiest month, and not much gardening gets done, but it's difficult to think it will be as rainy as the soaking of December and January. A typical January gets well under an inch of rain, and that gives gardeners a chance to plant the bare-root roses and fruit trees now at nurseries, to prune existing plants and to do other winter-only chores. This year, some of these activities will have to shift to February.
NEWS
July 21, 2001 | JILL LEOVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This time, it was the driver's hands that gave him away. They shook so badly that when he handed his passport to Customs Inspector Mark Laven, the booklet fluttered like a bird's wing. Laven all but rolled his eyes: Nothing subtle about this one. Within minutes, the driver, a Mexican citizen, had been hustled into a holding cell and inspectors were ripping his blue pickup apart with an electric saw.
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