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Rainer Maria Rilke

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BOOKS
June 9, 1991
This woman who was loved so much, that from one lyre more mourning came than from women in mourning; that a whole world was made from mourning, where everything was present once again: forest and valley and road and village, field, river, and animal; and that around this mourning-world, just as around the other earth, a sun and a silent star-filled sky wheeled, a mourning-sky with displaced constellations--: this woman who was loved so much . . .
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NEWS
October 9, 2003
Even though I am a single woman, I identified with Ralph Frammolino's piece ("Feeling the Pain of What Isn't to Be," Oct. 2). I think it has something to with "the grass is always greener," but I've never wanted the men who wanted me, and the men whom I wanted never wanted me. If they change their minds and do want me, I don't want them anymore. It must have to do with one's self-esteem. Maybe it's because I'm a Libra, who can never make up her mind, and once I finally do, I've missed the boat.
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BOOKS
January 4, 1998
Time and again, however well we know the landscape of love, and the little church-yard with lamenting names, and the frightfully silent ravine wherein all the others end: time and again we go out two together, under the old trees, lie down again and again between the flowers, face to face with the sky. Translated by J.B. LEISHMAN From "99 Poems in Translation," selected by Harold Pinter, Anthony Astbury and Geoffrey Godbert (Grove Press: 150 pp., $11)
BOOKS
June 29, 2003 | Carol Muske-Dukes
You Alone Are Real to Me Remembering Rainer Maria Rilke Lou Andreas-Salome Translated from the German by Angela von der Lippe BOA Editions: 150 pp., $22 Lou Andreas-Salome's "You Alone Are Real to Me" is a memoir that revives our faith in the subtlety and dignity of the genre. If the purpose of the memoir is to make the past live again, then this evocative meditation on Rainer Maria Rilke is nothing less than a resurrection of the great poet's internal life.
BOOKS
February 16, 1986 | WILLIAM WILSON, Wilson is The Times' art critic
If there are any young couples left who believe in poverty and great art, they are liable to exchange this little book at the holidays. Rainer Maria Rilke's "Letters on Cezanne" distills the very nectar from the romance of humble beginnings and noble aspirations. In 1907 the 31-year-old Czech-Austrian poet was living in Paris.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 9, 1999
Re "Killer of Gay Student Is Spared Death Penalty," Nov. 5: In a vengeful, bloodthirsty society of little understanding and less compassion, I am moved beyond measure by the parents of Matthew Shepard, who refused to take the life of their son's murderer. Their deeply human and loving act honors their son. What they have done is a too rare reminder of Rainer Maria Rilke's observation that "perhaps everything terrible is in its deepest being something helpless that wants help from us."
BOOKS
July 7, 1985
In Clayton Eshleman's review of the poetry of Rainer Maria Rilke (Book Review, May 26), he scrupulously takes the translation of A. Poulin Jr. to task for his inadequacy of rendering Rilke into English. Eshleman then equates Rilke's viewpoint with that of Paul Cezanne, a painter so dedicated to his art that he even neglected to attend his daughter's wedding. An impossibility, since Cezanne had only one child and that was a boy, whom he doted on. Young Cezanne used to take his father's painting and cut out all the windows on the houses with a razor blade.
BOOKS
November 28, 1999 | Rainer Maria Rilke
All of a sudden, outside in the park, something we cannot identify has gone from all the green. Quietly it presses closer to the windows; looks inside. Then from the copse, urgent and clear a plover calls. You think of Saint Jerome, such weight of solitude and zeal is there within this voice which cries out for the storm to hear!
NEWS
October 9, 2003
Even though I am a single woman, I identified with Ralph Frammolino's piece ("Feeling the Pain of What Isn't to Be," Oct. 2). I think it has something to with "the grass is always greener," but I've never wanted the men who wanted me, and the men whom I wanted never wanted me. If they change their minds and do want me, I don't want them anymore. It must have to do with one's self-esteem. Maybe it's because I'm a Libra, who can never make up her mind, and once I finally do, I've missed the boat.
BOOKS
October 27, 2002 | Susan Salter Reynolds
Battle Rock: The Struggle Over a One-Room School in America's Vanishing West, William Celis, Public Affairs: 221 pp., $25 This story about a one-room schoolhouse in a Colorado canyon began as an article in the New York Times. The Battle Rock School was founded in 1915 and for almost 80 years most of the students were cousins, brothers and sisters. In the 1990s, this changed dramatically (according to Celis, 5.2 million Americans in urban areas moved to the country).
BOOKS
January 2, 2000
Whoever you are: in the evening step out of your room, where you know everything; yours is the last house before the far-off: whoever you are. With your eyes, which in their weariness barely free themselves from the worn-out threshold, you lift very slowly one black tree and place it against the sky: slender, alone. And you have made the world. And it is huge and like a word which grows ripe in silence. And as your will seizes on its meaning, tenderly your eyes let it go. . .
BOOKS
November 28, 1999 | Rainer Maria Rilke
All of a sudden, outside in the park, something we cannot identify has gone from all the green. Quietly it presses closer to the windows; looks inside. Then from the copse, urgent and clear a plover calls. You think of Saint Jerome, such weight of solitude and zeal is there within this voice which cries out for the storm to hear!
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 9, 1999
Re "Killer of Gay Student Is Spared Death Penalty," Nov. 5: In a vengeful, bloodthirsty society of little understanding and less compassion, I am moved beyond measure by the parents of Matthew Shepard, who refused to take the life of their son's murderer. Their deeply human and loving act honors their son. What they have done is a too rare reminder of Rainer Maria Rilke's observation that "perhaps everything terrible is in its deepest being something helpless that wants help from us."
BOOKS
June 9, 1991
This woman who was loved so much, that from one lyre more mourning came than from women in mourning; that a whole world was made from mourning, where everything was present once again: forest and valley and road and village, field, river, and animal; and that around this mourning-world, just as around the other earth, a sun and a silent star-filled sky wheeled, a mourning-sky with displaced constellations--: this woman who was loved so much . . .
BOOKS
October 27, 2002 | Susan Salter Reynolds
Battle Rock: The Struggle Over a One-Room School in America's Vanishing West, William Celis, Public Affairs: 221 pp., $25 This story about a one-room schoolhouse in a Colorado canyon began as an article in the New York Times. The Battle Rock School was founded in 1915 and for almost 80 years most of the students were cousins, brothers and sisters. In the 1990s, this changed dramatically (according to Celis, 5.2 million Americans in urban areas moved to the country).
BOOKS
June 29, 2003 | Carol Muske-Dukes
You Alone Are Real to Me Remembering Rainer Maria Rilke Lou Andreas-Salome Translated from the German by Angela von der Lippe BOA Editions: 150 pp., $22 Lou Andreas-Salome's "You Alone Are Real to Me" is a memoir that revives our faith in the subtlety and dignity of the genre. If the purpose of the memoir is to make the past live again, then this evocative meditation on Rainer Maria Rilke is nothing less than a resurrection of the great poet's internal life.
BOOKS
February 16, 1986 | WILLIAM WILSON, Wilson is The Times' art critic
If there are any young couples left who believe in poverty and great art, they are liable to exchange this little book at the holidays. Rainer Maria Rilke's "Letters on Cezanne" distills the very nectar from the romance of humble beginnings and noble aspirations. In 1907 the 31-year-old Czech-Austrian poet was living in Paris.
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