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Rainer Werner Fassbinder

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ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 2012 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
His output was staggering, as were his excesses. And even though he died 30 years ago at age 37, his influence on the next generation of edgy, distinctive filmmakers remains powerful today. In his brief life, Rainer Werner Fassbinder cut a wide swath through German and international cinema. By the time he died from a combination of sleeping pills and cocaine, Fassbinder had made 40 feature films, two TV series, three short films, four video productions, 24 stage plays and four radio plays.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 19, 2013 | By Susan King
Renowned French director Agnes Varda, who was named this month as the guest artistic director of the AFI Fest 2013, has selected a program of four eclectic movies to be screened at the festival, which runs Nov. 7-14 in Hollywood.  The 85-year-old Varda, who directed her first feature, "La Pointe Courte," in 1955, has chosen films that have inspired her over the last six decades: Robert Bresson's acclaimed 1959 drama "Pickpocket"; John Cassavetes' 1974...
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 2011 | By Dennis Lim, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Rainer Werner Fassbinder died at age 37 in 1982, leaving behind a body of work so improbably large (more than 40 films) and so recklessly packed with big emotions and big ideas that we still seem to be digging our way through it. Last year saw the restoration of the little-known "World on a Wire," a brilliant science-fiction film that he made for German television in 1973, which will have its Los Angeles premiere at LACMA in August. Fassbinder kept up such a frenetic rate of production that much of his work barely got its due when he was alive.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 2012
'Cruelly, Madly, Deeply: The Films of Rainer Werner Fassbinder' Where: American Cinematheque's Egyptian Theatre, Hollywood; Aero Theatre, Santa Monica When: Thursday-June 14 Tickets: $11 Information: http://www.americancinematheque.com
ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 1995 | PHILIP BRANDES
The late writer-director Rainer Werner Fassbinder took endless delight in chronicling the aftermath of his country's Faustian bargain with fascism. Peeling back the high-minded bourgeois veneer of post-World War II West Germany, his films and plays laid bare the constants of greed and predatory cruelty.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 19, 2013 | By Susan King
Renowned French director Agnes Varda, who was named this month as the guest artistic director of the AFI Fest 2013, has selected a program of four eclectic movies to be screened at the festival, which runs Nov. 7-14 in Hollywood.  The 85-year-old Varda, who directed her first feature, "La Pointe Courte," in 1955, has chosen films that have inspired her over the last six decades: Robert Bresson's acclaimed 1959 drama "Pickpocket"; John Cassavetes' 1974...
ENTERTAINMENT
January 7, 1988 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, Times Arts Editor
New York's Museum of Modern Art, which more often presents film retrospectives celebrating the work of directors and actors, on Friday opens a fortnight's tribute to a producer: a 44-year-old producer who does not fit the traditional model and whose name is thus far a household word only in industry households. Edward R. Pressman is slim, shy and balding. He speaks slowly, weighing his answers carefully in a vocabulary singularly lacking in cliches or glib phrases.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 2012
'Cruelly, Madly, Deeply: The Films of Rainer Werner Fassbinder' Where: American Cinematheque's Egyptian Theatre, Hollywood; Aero Theatre, Santa Monica When: Thursday-June 14 Tickets: $11 Information: http://www.americancinematheque.com
ENTERTAINMENT
August 14, 2011 | By Mark Olsen, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Long before such filmmakers as Michael Mann and Martin Scorsese and Todd Haynes began shifting between theatrical features and work made for television, Germany's Rainer Werner Fassbinder was crafting groundbreaking TV with projects including his epic 1980 miniseries "Berlin Alexanderplatz. " Another of his made-for-TV films, 1973's two-part, 3 1/2-hour science-fiction head-spinner "World on a Wire," is enjoying a resurgent wave of interest. The film had been more or less lost to audiences after its initial German broadcast because of issues with the underlying literary rights, but a new restoration is finally making "World on a Wire" accessible to a generation of enthusiastic cinéastes . Based on the novel "Simulacron 3" by Daniel F. Galouye and co-written by Fassbinder and Fritz Müller-Scherz, the film is part detective thriller, part deconstruction of personal identity and part futuristic fortune-telling.
NEWS
November 4, 1985
A theater in Frankfurt, West Germany, decided to postpone until Nov. 13 a play by Rainer Werner Fassbinder that Jewish groups denounced as anti-Semitic. Director Guenther Ruehle said an attempt to stage the play today was canceled for fear that demonstrations could become violent. Members of Frankfurt's Jewish community stormed the stage last Thursday and prevented what would have been the premiere of "Rubbish, the City and Death."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 2012 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
His output was staggering, as were his excesses. And even though he died 30 years ago at age 37, his influence on the next generation of edgy, distinctive filmmakers remains powerful today. In his brief life, Rainer Werner Fassbinder cut a wide swath through German and international cinema. By the time he died from a combination of sleeping pills and cocaine, Fassbinder had made 40 feature films, two TV series, three short films, four video productions, 24 stage plays and four radio plays.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 14, 2011 | By Mark Olsen, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Long before such filmmakers as Michael Mann and Martin Scorsese and Todd Haynes began shifting between theatrical features and work made for television, Germany's Rainer Werner Fassbinder was crafting groundbreaking TV with projects including his epic 1980 miniseries "Berlin Alexanderplatz. " Another of his made-for-TV films, 1973's two-part, 3 1/2-hour science-fiction head-spinner "World on a Wire," is enjoying a resurgent wave of interest. The film had been more or less lost to audiences after its initial German broadcast because of issues with the underlying literary rights, but a new restoration is finally making "World on a Wire" accessible to a generation of enthusiastic cinéastes . Based on the novel "Simulacron 3" by Daniel F. Galouye and co-written by Fassbinder and Fritz Müller-Scherz, the film is part detective thriller, part deconstruction of personal identity and part futuristic fortune-telling.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 2011 | By Dennis Lim, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Rainer Werner Fassbinder died at age 37 in 1982, leaving behind a body of work so improbably large (more than 40 films) and so recklessly packed with big emotions and big ideas that we still seem to be digging our way through it. Last year saw the restoration of the little-known "World on a Wire," a brilliant science-fiction film that he made for German television in 1973, which will have its Los Angeles premiere at LACMA in August. Fassbinder kept up such a frenetic rate of production that much of his work barely got its due when he was alive.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 1995 | PHILIP BRANDES
The late writer-director Rainer Werner Fassbinder took endless delight in chronicling the aftermath of his country's Faustian bargain with fascism. Peeling back the high-minded bourgeois veneer of post-World War II West Germany, his films and plays laid bare the constants of greed and predatory cruelty.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 7, 1988 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, Times Arts Editor
New York's Museum of Modern Art, which more often presents film retrospectives celebrating the work of directors and actors, on Friday opens a fortnight's tribute to a producer: a 44-year-old producer who does not fit the traditional model and whose name is thus far a household word only in industry households. Edward R. Pressman is slim, shy and balding. He speaks slowly, weighing his answers carefully in a vocabulary singularly lacking in cliches or glib phrases.
NEWS
November 12, 1985
A theater in Frankfurt will not perform a controversial play by the late Rainer Werner Fassbinder that has been denounced by Jewish and other groups as anti-Semitic. Theater manager Guenther Ruehle said all performances of "Garbage, the City and Death," have been canceled "to preserve the inner peace of the city and to maintain the possibility of the work of the theater." Jewish groups forced the cancellation of the play's premiere Oct.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 1987 | RICK SHERWOOD and DEBORAH CAULFIELD, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
The European premiere of "Rubbish, the City and Death," a play by the late German film maker Rainer Werner Fassbinder, was canceled Wednesday after protesters stormed the stage of Rotterdam's Lantaren Theater, Reuters news service reported. The protesters complained that the play about a Jewish real estate investor's exploitation of a German prostitute would promote anti-Semitism. The play has been banned in other European countries, but did have a brief run in New York.
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