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ENTERTAINMENT
October 29, 1995
Rolling Stone Press editor Holly George-Warren states that the upcoming publication of their Jerry Garcia tribute book gives her a "vast amount of guilt" and makes her feel like a "corpse-sucker" (Pop Eye, Oct. 15). She's right to feel this way. As an environmental activist, Garcia would probably not have objected to having his remains recycled for whatever essential treasures could be harvested, but for the health of the planet, and not for Rolling Stone's economic concerns. I suggest that Rolling Stone contribute every last penny of profit from this publication to Garcia's favorite charity, the Rainforest Foundation.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 29, 1995
Rolling Stone Press editor Holly George-Warren states that the upcoming publication of their Jerry Garcia tribute book gives her a "vast amount of guilt" and makes her feel like a "corpse-sucker" (Pop Eye, Oct. 15). She's right to feel this way. As an environmental activist, Garcia would probably not have objected to having his remains recycled for whatever essential treasures could be harvested, but for the health of the planet, and not for Rolling Stone's economic concerns. I suggest that Rolling Stone contribute every last penny of profit from this publication to Garcia's favorite charity, the Rainforest Foundation.
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BUSINESS
September 8, 1992 | MICHELE LINGRE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In the mid-1980s, John Sebastian Cusenza, founder and president of the hair-care and cosmetics company Sebastian International Inc., abandoned several of his products that contained harmful or polluting ingredients such as ammonia. Instead, he started marketing products that were more environmentally sensitive. He chose the Rainforest Foundation--a high-profile charity that fights the destruction of the Amazon rain forest--to be a symbol of Sebastian International's new "green" image.
BUSINESS
September 8, 1992 | MICHELE LINGRE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In the mid-1980s, John Sebastian Cusenza, founder and president of the hair-care and cosmetics company Sebastian International Inc., abandoned several of his products that contained harmful or polluting ingredients such as ammonia. Instead, he started marketing products that were more environmentally sensitive. He chose the Rainforest Foundation--a high-profile charity that fights the destruction of the Amazon rain forest--to be a symbol of Sebastian International's new "green" image.
NEWS
February 2, 1990 | ROSE-MARIE TURK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sebastian International did more than sing the praises of its latest cuts and colors early this week at the Hairdressers' Guild show in Long Beach. Executives of the Woodland Hills hair-care and cosmetics company put employees in issue-oriented T-shirts ("Protect the Planet, Protect the Species"), introduced biodegradable packaging and sealed its commitment to the Rainforest Foundation with a $50,000 check and a promise of $200,000 more by the end of the year.
TRAVEL
March 12, 2000 | ARTHUR FROMMER
Money can't buy the experience of standing on a volcanic Hawaiian mountain and surveying the endless expanse of tropical green below, nor can it pay for the school of tropical fish that darts past you on a snorkeling excursion. Money can, however, pay for a guide to lead your hike up the mountain, and it can obtain for you the equipment necessary for snorkeling.
FOOD
July 13, 1995
Once upon a time, young waiters learned all about table settings, napkin folding, how to serve and clear, how to divine the diners' wishes and so forth from older waiters. These days, the older waiters might still be going to college like the newcomers. For that matter, mothers taught their daughters this sort of thing once upon a time. But not so much of this teaching goes on at mother's knee these days, and as a result, many a dinner party is a clumsy mess.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 1989 | CHRIS WILLMAN
Malcolm McLaren's multimedia event on Saturday at the Hollywood Palladium--partially benefiting the Rainforest Foundation and incorporating aspects of New York fashion culture with Brazilian music and dance--was predictably, irresistibly pretentious: We can hang out with the Warhol set and get down with the south-of-the-equator conga crowd too, it begged attendees to brag.
NEWS
December 11, 1994 | THE SOCIAL CLIMES STAFF
Sin City may never be the same. The new Hard Rock Hotel & Casino in Las Vegas has installed--drum roll please--politically correct slot machines. (Its words are "the world's first socially responsible and morally conscious" slot machines.) Here's how it works: The money you lose will be donated to the Natural Resources Defense Council, Conservation International and Sting's Rainforest Foundation. Of course, what you do with your winnings is still up to you.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 1993 | LYNNE HEFFLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rock 'n' roll luminary Sting, fire-eaters, pie-throwing and Daffy Duck--hardly the usual rock concert bill of fare. But then, the "Children for the Rainforest" event, at the Greek Theatre May 9, is not the usual benefit. Organizer Nick Turner calls the star-studded family event "a 'Lollapalooza' for the under 10s." A benefit for the Rainforest Foundation, the eclectic festivities include mainstage entertainment by Sting, Whoopi Goldberg, Bobby McFerrin, Disney's Craig 'n Co.
NEWS
February 2, 1990 | ROSE-MARIE TURK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sebastian International did more than sing the praises of its latest cuts and colors early this week at the Hairdressers' Guild show in Long Beach. Executives of the Woodland Hills hair-care and cosmetics company put employees in issue-oriented T-shirts ("Protect the Planet, Protect the Species"), introduced biodegradable packaging and sealed its commitment to the Rainforest Foundation with a $50,000 check and a promise of $200,000 more by the end of the year.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 2000 | LETTA TAYLER, NEWSDAY
The theme of the 10th annual Rainforest Foundation benefit Thursday night was respect, both for the environment and for soul, a musical genre that has profoundly influenced the show's performers. Almost every song in the delightfully engaging concert was a soul classic, from the aching "Sittin' on the Dock of the Bay" to the buoyant "It Takes Two."
NEWS
February 22, 1990 | BEA MAXWELL
Pacemaker recipient, 91-year-old Roy Sakioka, presented a donation of $100,000 to Frank Mendicina, president of White Memorial Medical Center Foundation, at a ceremony Jan. 11. Sakioka received a pacemaker in 1988, and the donation reflects his appreciation of the hospital and its medical staff. The funds are earmarked for the hospital's cardiac services. * The American Diabetes Assn.
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