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Rains

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 2014 | By Matt Stevens
A stubborn marine layer brought light drizzle to Southern California's coast and valleys Tuesday, a precursor to an incoming cold front that likely will dump rain on the region this week. The system will bring a 20% chance of light rain to Los Angeles around 8 p.m. Tuesday, said National Weather Service meteorologist Kathy Hoxsie. The chance of rain will increase to about 50% by Wednesday. The rain is expected to linger into Thursday and clear up by Friday, when Hoxsie said temperatures are expected to warm from the 60s into the 70s. “We welcome the rain, whatever we can get, but it's nothing on the order of what we had last month,” she said.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 23, 2014 | By Anh Do
Light rain is expected in the Los Angeles area by midweek, forecasters said. There's a 40% to 50% chance of light showers by Wednesday night, said David Sweet, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service. Even if it's just a quarter of an inch, "every bit helps," he said. Angelenos will experience mostly sunny weather through Tuesday, with highs in the mid-60s through mid-70s. But temperatures could drop slightly by Wednesday as a low-pressure system rolls through Los Angeles, bringing with it at least a sprinkle of rain, said Bill Patzert, a climatologist for the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in La Canada Flintridge.  "There will be just enough so we can play bumper tag on the freeway, moving around the dust on our car," Patzert said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 2014 | By Bettina Boxall
Thanks to February storms, state officials are slightly easing drought restrictions on water deliveries, but the changes won't make a difference to most of the state. The prime beneficiaries will be Central Valley irrigation districts with the most senior water rights. Although last month's above average rainfall in Northern California improved the water supply picture somewhat, officials Tuesday continued to predict that the big state and federal water projects that help supply a majority of Californians will deliver little or no water to most agricultural and urban agencies this year.
SPORTS
March 16, 2014 | By Dan Loumena
Carl Edwards won a rain-plagued NASCAR Sprint Cup Series race on Saturday, fittingly with the final two laps under caution as showers began to fall again. The Food City 500 was delayed nearly two hours before the start and for another three hours after 124 laps. The race restarted on Lap 167 with Kurt Busch taking the lead from Matt Kenseth for the lead. The race had already run 43 laps under caution. Edwards lead a sweep of Fords, with Roush Fenway Racing teammate Ricky Stenhouse Jr. taking second and Aric Almirola of Richard Petty Motorsports finishing third.
NEWS
March 7, 2014 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Deal and Travel Blogger
It's been a lousy year for water, but recent heavy rains in Southern California have sown a few seeds of hope that golden poppies in the Antelope Valley just might put on a show this year. Not a big show, but a show. The brown fields at the Antelope Valley California Poppy Reserve in Lancaster have greened up since storms last week dropped 3 1/2 inches of rain. The moisture plumped up little poppies that had struggled to sprout during drought conditions with flowers so small you'd have to be standing on top of them to take notice.
OPINION
March 4, 2014
Re "Rain brings mud, misery," March 2 Last Thursday evening, with the first of our recent storms moving into Southern California, I pedaled steadily along the Los Angeles River bike path. Trying to make it home before the heaviest rain came, I noticed all the sprinklers watering the landscaping. This, just after our governor unveiled his drought relief plan. The storms were given much media attention, so they didn't take us by surprise. Of all local water users, the city should have been paying attention and setting an example of conservation.
SCIENCE
March 3, 2014 | By Tony Barboza
Wait three days after it rains before going into the ocean. It's a warning that public health officials issued to beachgoers this week, as they do after any significant storm in California. But a study released Monday is raising questions about whether that three-day waiting period is enough to protect people who swim, surf and play in the ocean from pathogens in storm runoff that can make them ill. "To err on the side of caution, stay out of the water for five days after rainfall," said Amanda Griesbach, a water quality scientist at Heal the Bay , an environmental group that provided data and other support for the research by undergraduate students at the UCLA Institute of the Environment and Sustainability.
NEWS
March 2, 2014 | By Amy Hubbard
Stars have been trotting out for the Academy Awards since 1929.  On this rainy Oscar Sunday, we looked back as far as 1945 to see how often the awards have been affected. Check out our graphic below showing rainfall at the Academy Awards.  Real-time coverage of the Academy Awards 2014   @AmyTheHub
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 2, 2014 | By Samantha Schaefer
Mandatory evacuations have been lifted in two foothill communities threatened by mudslides below wildfire-ravaged areas. Glendora residents were allowed to return home Sunday when an evacuation order was lifted at 6 a.m. The 2,000-acre Colby fire in the San Gabriel Mountains in January left some neighborhoods vulnerable to flooding and mudslides. Rain-related parking restrictions were still in effect, and residents were directed to move vehicles, trash bins and other obstructions from the streets.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 2, 2014 | By Tony Barboza
El Niño, nature's most powerful influence on weather around the globe, has been in a lull for two years. But indications suggest that could change as early as fall. Since spring 2012, the eastern tropical Pacific Ocean has not warmed enough to create an El Niño. Nor has it cooled to form a La Niña. Instead, it has lingered in an in-between state some experts call "La Nada. " Though it is too early to predict with much certainty, scientists say their observations and computer models show increasing signs of El Niño's return, which might portend more rain for California.
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