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January 27, 2012 | By Paula Woods, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Four years ago, "Child 44," Tom Rob Smith's debut thriller set in Stalinist Russia, was a literary sensation. An edgy, intense portrait of Russia's secret police and the lengths they would go to to protect their country's image as a crime-free society, "Child 44" managed to straddle a fine line between well-researched, absorbing historical fiction and propulsive thriller that would earn the book universal praise, sales of more than 1.5 million copies...
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 27, 2012 | By Paula Woods, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Four years ago, "Child 44," Tom Rob Smith's debut thriller set in Stalinist Russia, was a literary sensation. An edgy, intense portrait of Russia's secret police and the lengths they would go to to protect their country's image as a crime-free society, "Child 44" managed to straddle a fine line between well-researched, absorbing historical fiction and propulsive thriller that would earn the book universal praise, sales of more than 1.5 million copies...
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NEWS
October 6, 1986 | From Times Wire Services
Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev's wife, Raisa, will accompany him to next weekend's summit here with President Reagan, Iceland Prime Minister Steingrimur Hermannsson said Sunday. Mrs. Gorbachev, who also accompanied her husband to the last summit with Reagan in Geneva last November, will be the guest of Hermannsson's wife, Edda Gudmundsdottir. In Washington, White House spokesman Dale Petroskey said President Reagan's wife, Nancy, "has no plans to go" with him to Reykjavik.
NEWS
September 21, 1999 | MAURA REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Raisa M. Gorbachev, the bold and beautiful wife of former Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev who stepped out of the Kremlin's shadow to become Russia's first truly public first lady, died Monday after a battle with leukemia. She was 67. Raisa Gorbachev had checked into a hospital in Muenster, Germany, on July 25 with a rare and acute case of the blood cancer. She underwent chemotherapy and had prepared for a bone-marrow transplant before taking a turn for the worse last week.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 1994 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The battle between mothers and daughters approaches bedlam in Cheryl L. West's "Jar the Floor," at the Old Globe's Cassius Carter Centre Stage. West throws four generations of resentful daughters together--and these women not only jar the floor, they raise the roof. It's a familiar theme. For one of many examples, think of the Witch in "Into the Woods" (which happens to have been born at the Old Globe) lamenting about how children transform from someone you love into someone you lose.
NEWS
October 31, 1991 | Associated Press
Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev on Wednesday assured the French that he had taken no offense at Francois Mitterrand's apparent loss of faith during the August coup attempt in Moscow. During the coup, Mitterrand referred to the coup masterminds as the "new leaders" of the Soviet Union. After it failed, French politicians attacked him for having given the impression he felt the overthrow would succeed.
NEWS
November 26, 1987
William Eaton, whose article on Raisa Gorbachev appeared Nov. 19 as "Resenting Raisa," is misinformed. The Soviet Union does not have anyone in the unofficial position of First Lady. First-ladyships are a phenomenon restricted to the United States. Mrs. Gorbachev is simply the wife of the secretary general of the Soviet Union. I have seen articles referring to Mrs. Gorbachev as "First Lady" ever since the summit in Geneva. IGOR SEMYONOV Los Angeles
NEWS
December 4, 1987
I am writing to respond to The Times' fawning profile of Raisa Gorbachev. ("Resenting Raisa," by William Eaton, Nov. 19). Resentment of Mrs. Gorbachev's luxurious life style and fashionable wardrobe is not based on mere "envy," but on the knowledge that this sybaritic life style is supported by the oppression of millions of ordinary Russians and Eastern Bloc peoples. The American media seem to be bending over backward to act as press agents for the latest incarnation of Stalin and his wife.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 1, 1990
It is reported that about 15% of the Wellesley College student body have protested the invitation to Barbara Bush to speak at their commencement exercises. On the other hand, Raisa Gorbachev appears to be welcome without dissent by these young women. Mrs. Bush, wife of our President, has traveled all over the world, moves among people of great accomplishment and influence with ease, has lived in China and several of our various states, reared five children successfully, actively supported her husband's business and political careers, has a loving and enduring marriage, and is currently the official hostess for the White House.
NEWS
November 7, 1987 | Associated Press
Raisa Gorbachev will accompany her husband, Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev, to Washington for his summit meeting with President Reagan beginning Dec. 7, Administration officials said Friday. The officials, speaking on condition of anonymity, said details of her itinerary were not available. Raisa Gorbachev and First Lady Nancy Reagan went to Geneva when their husbands first met in 1985. Raisa Gorbachev attended the U.S.
NEWS
August 5, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Raisa Gorbachev, the wife of former Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev, is seriously ill with leukemia and "very weakened" by the disease and chemotherapy, German doctors said. Gorbachev was at her side at the clinic in Muenster, where she has been receiving treatment for an acute form of the blood cancer for 10 days, an official said. "Examinations have shown that Mrs. Gorbachev has acute leukemia," the hospital said in a statement.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 1994 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The battle between mothers and daughters approaches bedlam in Cheryl L. West's "Jar the Floor," at the Old Globe's Cassius Carter Centre Stage. West throws four generations of resentful daughters together--and these women not only jar the floor, they raise the roof. It's a familiar theme. For one of many examples, think of the Witch in "Into the Woods" (which happens to have been born at the Old Globe) lamenting about how children transform from someone you love into someone you lose.
NEWS
June 15, 1992 | GERALDINE BAUM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It would be hard to imagine Raisa Gorbachev referring to herself as a babushka the way Naina Yeltsin recently did. Perhaps Madame Gorbachev would describe herself as an intellect or a model of Marxism, modernism and fashion. But she most certainly would stiffen at the suggestion she was a formless grandmother in sensible shoes. But if Raisa's bold style and Western wardrobe were a break with tradition, then Naina Yeltsin's hausfrau look and shy manner are something of a throwback.
BOOKS
December 8, 1991
Katrina Vanden Heuvel's Oct. 27 review of Raisa Gorbachev's reminiscenses, "I Hope," rekindled bitter memories for me. As a result of the Marxist-Leninist system, Mrs. Gorbachev's grandfather, a well-to-do farmer ( kulak ) disappeared during the Stalinist purges of the 1930s. My parents disappeared in the post-Stalinist purge era of the late 1950s. Unlike Mrs. Gorbachev (nee Titorenko), I did not sell out to the very system that destroyed my family. Mrs. Gorbachev became a specialist in the Marxist-Leninist theory which she lectured on as a faculty member in the Philosophy Department at Moscow University, her alma mater.
NEWS
October 31, 1991 | Associated Press
Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev on Wednesday assured the French that he had taken no offense at Francois Mitterrand's apparent loss of faith during the August coup attempt in Moscow. During the coup, Mitterrand referred to the coup masterminds as the "new leaders" of the Soviet Union. After it failed, French politicians attacked him for having given the impression he felt the overthrow would succeed.
OPINION
October 27, 1991 | Georgi V. Pryakhin, Raisa Gorbachev is the wife of the president of the Soviet Union. Raisa Gorbachev's new memoir is written in the form of an extended interview with Soviet journalist Georgi V. Pryakhin. An adapted excerpt
Question: Your mother's parents were of a peasant family. Did they have an easy life? Answer: Don't you believe it--as my mother tells me now. Don't you believe that peasants were prosperous in the past. It was hard and hopeless labor. The land, the cattle and little to eat. "Your poor grandmother!" my mother, Aleksandra Petrovna, exclaims every time. It was forced labor and not a normal life that she had. She plowed, sowed, washed the clothes and fed six children.
BOOKS
October 27, 1991 | Katrina Vanden Heuvel, Vanden Heuvel is the author, with Stephen F. Cohen, of " Voices of Glasnost: Interviews With Gorbachev's Reformers" and the editor of the anthology "The Nation: 1865-1990 . "
In a meeting with newspaper editors several weeks after the failed coup, Mikhail Gorbachev was asked about his wife Raisa. "She is a person with a lively imagination . . . capable not only of sympathizing but of analyzing. When I am asked, do you discuss all issues with your wife . . . I reply, 'All issues.' " Gorbachev was therefore surprised, he admitted, that she did not discuss everything with him: "I only recently learned that last year she was writing notes for a book."
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