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Rajendra K Pachauri

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 28, 2008 | Margot Roosevelt, Times Staff Writer
Global warming celebrity Rajendra K. Pachauri, wearing a green feather in his lapel, toured Northern California on Friday, praising the state's blueprint for addressing climate change but reminding public officials that Europe is moving far more quickly to address the issue. The chairman of the United Nations' Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, who recently accepted the Nobel Peace Prize alongside Al Gore, met with legislators, bureaucrats and bigwigs.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 28, 2008 | Margot Roosevelt, Times Staff Writer
Global warming celebrity Rajendra K. Pachauri, wearing a green feather in his lapel, toured Northern California on Friday, praising the state's blueprint for addressing climate change but reminding public officials that Europe is moving far more quickly to address the issue. The chairman of the United Nations' Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, who recently accepted the Nobel Peace Prize alongside Al Gore, met with legislators, bureaucrats and bigwigs.
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NEWS
April 4, 2002 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush administration is pushing for an engineer from India to take over the helm of an influential international science panel on global warming that is now headed by an American atmospheric chemist who has been criticized by the energy industry. Energy lobbyists have accused Robert T. Watson, chairman of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, of promoting his own agenda. In a memo to the White House a year ago, a senior Exxon Mobil Corp.
NEWS
January 30, 2005 | Charles J. Hanley, Associated Press Writer
Up and down the icy spine of South America, the glaciers are melting, the white mantle of the Andes Mountains washing away at an ever faster rate. "Look. You can see. Chacaltaya has split in two," scientist Edson Ramirez said as he led a visitor toward a once-grand ice flow high in the thin air of the Bolivian cordillera. In the distance below, beneath drifting clouds, sprawled 2-mile-high La Paz, a growing city that survives on the water running off the shoulders of these treeless peaks.
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