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Rakhman Nabiyev

NEWS
October 1, 1991 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Communist regime that seized power in Tadzhikistan a week ago began to crumble Monday under the weight of a marathon street protest as the regime lifted a national state of emergency and agreed to consider suspending both the Communist Party and its hard-line leader. With tens of thousands of protesters shouting "Resign! Resign!" from their growing tent city just outside the Parliament building, President Rakhman Nabiyev, who led the coup, announced that he is ready to give up his post.
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NEWS
April 27, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Thousands of anti-government demonstrators pitched tents in front of the president's office, vowing to stay until he fires former Communists in the government. They want President Rakhman Nabiyev to remove ex-Communist senior officials. They also called for multi-party elections and more religious freedom.
NEWS
November 28, 1992 | Reuters
Tajikistan's Parliament voted Friday to abandon the presidency and declared the war-torn Central Asian state a parliamentary republic, Russia's Itar-Tass news agency reported. Former Tajik President Rakhman Nabiyev, a former Communist, was swept from power by a coalition of Muslim radical and democrat forces in September. Fighting then flared into a virtual civil war, killing hundreds of people and leaving more than 100,000 homeless in the impoverished republic bordering Afghanistan and China.
NEWS
September 5, 1992 | From Associated Press
Four former Soviet republics said Friday that they would send troops to police Tajikistan's border with Afghanistan to prevent the smuggling of arms and drugs into this politically troubled country. In a strongly worded statement, Russia, Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan and Kyrgyzstan warned that political instability in Tajikistan is threatening security throughout Central Asia.
NEWS
November 25, 1991 | Reuters
Soviet Tadzhikistan voted Sunday in its first presidential elections, but most people in the hillside town of Kiblai seemed hungrier for bread than for democracy. Men grumbled about shortages as they lined up to receive their monthly ration of flour and carry it away on donkeys to feed their families. "We're hoping for something better," said a 37-year-old farm worker. "Under communism everything was fine.
NEWS
September 3, 1992 | Reuters
Tajikistan President Rakhman Nabiyev, facing a simmering civil war in the south of his country, has been removed from power, a statement read on Tajik Radio said Wednesday. The statement, monitored by the British Broadcasting Corp., said the parliamentary leadership and the Cabinet had no confidence in Nabiyev, who was elected in November. Nabiyev's whereabouts have been unknown since armed militants on Monday occupied his residence in the capital, Dushanbe, and took ministers hostage.
NEWS
May 11, 1992 | Associated Press
KGB troops loyal to the embattled president of this Central Asian republic fired on a crowd of unarmed protesters Sunday, killing at least four, witnesses said. The shooting took place in front of secret police headquarters, where President Rakhman Nabiyev was hiding in a bunker. Muslim opposition groups negotiating with the hard-line former Communist government immediately broke off talks on a transfer of power.
NEWS
November 20, 1992 | STEPHANIE SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fresh fears of violence in Tajikistan arose Thursday, hours after a new parliamentary leader was elected and a deputy secret police chief was killed in an ambush on the streets of Dushanbe, the capital of the war-torn Central Asian state. The late-night assassination of Jurabek Aminov, a senior politician who had tried to broker a peace between Islamic fundamentalists and pro-Communist forces embroiled in a civil war, seemed certain to spark new bloodshed.
NEWS
September 4, 1992 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To the casual observer, Thursday was a business-as-usual day in the capital of the former Soviet Central Asian republic of Tajikistan, but beneath the calm exterior, the newly independent country was in the midst of a political crisis. Armed rebels, who took over the president's headquarters Monday, are apparently on the verge of accomplishing what a six-week protest earlier this year was not able to achieve--the ouster of the hard-line president of that impoverished, mountainous republic.
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