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Raloxifene Drug

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NATIONAL
June 6, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
Final results from a large study comparing two drugs for preventing breast cancer challenge the government's claim that raloxifene is safer than the old standby, tamoxifen. In April, the National Cancer Institute, which paid for the $88-million study, said users of raloxifene had fewer uterine cancers and blood clots. But study results released in Atlanta showed that the number of uterine cancer cases differed so little that they could have happened by chance.
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NATIONAL
June 6, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
Final results from a large study comparing two drugs for preventing breast cancer challenge the government's claim that raloxifene is safer than the old standby, tamoxifen. In April, the National Cancer Institute, which paid for the $88-million study, said users of raloxifene had fewer uterine cancers and blood clots. But study results released in Atlanta showed that the number of uterine cancer cases differed so little that they could have happened by chance.
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SCIENCE
April 18, 2006 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
The osteoporosis drug raloxifene is as effective as the drug now used to prevent breast cancer in high-risk post-menopausal women, but it has a much lower risk of producing life-threatening uterine cancer and blood clots, according to a new government study comparing the two drugs.
SCIENCE
April 18, 2006 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
The osteoporosis drug raloxifene is as effective as the drug now used to prevent breast cancer in high-risk post-menopausal women, but it has a much lower risk of producing life-threatening uterine cancer and blood clots, according to a new government study comparing the two drugs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 17, 1999 | From Times staff and wire reports
Raloxifene, a drug intended to combat bone loss, reduces the risk of breast cancer by 76% in post-menopausal women, doctors from UC San Francisco reported today in the Journal of the American Medical Assn. Raloxifene belongs to a group of drugs that mimic estrogen in some parts of the body and may therefore have some of estrogen's benefits.
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