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Raloxifene Hydrochloride Drug

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NEWS
May 19, 1998 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
A drug used to prevent osteoporosis in older women reduces the risk of breast cancer by as much as 70% without any serious side effects, researchers said Monday at a meeting of the American Society for Clinical Oncology in Los Angeles. The risk reduction produced by the drug, called raloxifene, is about the same as that reported earlier this year for tamoxifen, but the latter drug can increase the risk of endometrial cancer and blood clots.
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NEWS
May 26, 1999 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Cancer researchers Tuesday announced the start of a large-scale breast cancer prevention study pitting tamoxifen--approved last fall to reduce the risk of the disease--against a newer drug, raloxifene, which is used to prevent osteoporosis. Scientists hope that raloxifene will prove more effective with fewer serious side effects than tamoxifen, which is known to raise the risk of endometrial cancer.
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NEWS
May 26, 1999 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Cancer researchers Tuesday announced the start of a large-scale breast cancer prevention study pitting tamoxifen--approved last fall to reduce the risk of the disease--against a newer drug, raloxifene, which is used to prevent osteoporosis. Scientists hope that raloxifene will prove more effective with fewer serious side effects than tamoxifen, which is known to raise the risk of endometrial cancer.
NEWS
November 27, 1998 | PETER M. WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The largest-ever clinical trial of breast cancer prevention drugs will begin early next year at cancer centers in Southern California and nationwide. The $75-million study will compare two drugs for their toxicity and ability to prevent cancer in 22,000 post-menopausal women who have a high risk of breast cancer. Advocates say the study's results could save many women from more drastic cancer-fighting measures: mastectomies, chemotherapy and radiation.
NEWS
November 27, 1998 | PETER M. WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The largest-ever clinical trial of breast cancer prevention drugs will begin early next year at cancer centers in Southern California and nationwide. The $75-million study will compare two drugs for their toxicity and ability to prevent cancer in 22,000 post-menopausal women who have a high risk of breast cancer. Advocates say the study's results could save many women from more drastic cancer-fighting measures: mastectomies, chemotherapy and radiation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 27, 1998 | PETER M. WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The largest clinical trial of breast cancer prevention drugs will begin early next year at UC Irvine and other cancer centers nationwide. The $75-million study will compare two drugs for their toxicity and ability to prevent cancer in 22,000 post-menopausal women who have a high risk of breast cancer. Advocates say the study's results could save many women from more drastic cancer-fighting measures: mastectomies, chemotherapy and radiation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 27, 1998 | PETER M. WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The largest clinical trial of breast cancer prevention drugs will begin early next year at UC Irvine and other cancer centers nationwide. The $75-million study will compare two drugs for their toxicity and ability to prevent cancer in 22,000 post-menopausal women who have a high risk of breast cancer. Advocates say the study's results could save many women from more drastic cancer-fighting measures: mastectomies, chemotherapy and radiation.
NEWS
May 19, 1998 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
A drug used to prevent osteoporosis in older women reduces the risk of breast cancer by as much as 70% without any serious side effects, researchers said Monday at a meeting of the American Society for Clinical Oncology in Los Angeles. The risk reduction produced by the drug, called raloxifene, is about the same as that reported earlier this year for tamoxifen, but the latter drug can increase the risk of endometrial cancer and blood clots.
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