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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 28, 1989
A new trial was ordered Thursday for former Rockwell International Corp. official Ralph Affinito, whose conviction in a defense contract scheme was voided when mail fraud laws were narrowed by the U.S. Supreme Court. Affinito, of Rolling Hills Estates, was convicted by a Los Angeles federal court jury two years ago of five counts of mail fraud for allegedly channeling $430,000 worth of defense contracts to a machine shop he owned secretly.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 28, 1989
A new trial was ordered Thursday for former Rockwell International Corp. official Ralph Affinito, whose conviction in a defense contract scheme was voided when mail fraud laws were narrowed by the U.S. Supreme Court. Affinito, of Rolling Hills Estates, was convicted by a Los Angeles federal court jury two years ago of five counts of mail fraud for allegedly channeling $430,000 worth of defense contracts to a machine shop he owned secretly.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 20, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A former Rockwell International supervisor was sentenced Monday in Los Angeles to four years in prison for running a sham machine shop that received Rockwell subcontracts for B1-B bomber parts. U.S. District Judge Terry Hatter imposed the sentence and a $12,000 fine on Ralph Affinito, 49, of Rolling Hills Estates. Affinito, a former Rockwell purchasing department supervisor, pleaded guilty in July to three felonies in connection with the scheme.
NEWS
May 15, 1987 | KIM MURPHY, Times Staff Writer
A former Rockwell International purchasing manager was convicted Thursday of funneling $500,000 in Air Force B-1 bomber contracts to a company in which he held a hidden partnership. A federal jury found Ralph Affinito, 46, guilty of five counts of mail fraud as part of an elaborate contracting scheme in which he established an outside machine shop to bid on contracts for the bomber, then secretly diverted the work to firms that had not been approved for government work.
BUSINESS
August 1, 1990 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A former Rockwell International Corp. purchasing supervisor pleaded guilty Thursday in federal court in Los Angeles to mail fraud and conspiracy to receive kickbacks in connection with a scheme to defraud the defense contractor on the B-1B bomber program. Ralph Affinito, 49, of Rancho Palos Verdes, pleaded guilty to secretly setting up a sham machine shop in an effort to obtain subcontracts from Rockwell, where he was working as a supervisor in the parts purchasing department in El Segundo.
NEWS
July 25, 1986 | WILLIAM OVEREND, Times Staff Writer
Nineteen former defense-industry purchasing agents and suppliers involved in subcontracts on a dozen of the nation's most sensitive military projects were indicted on bribery and kickback charges Thursday in Los Angeles as part of a federal crackdown on "widespread and longstanding" defense industry corruption. Describing bribery and kickbacks as "a cancer on the defense industry," U.S. Atty. Robert C.
NEWS
August 12, 1986 | RONALD L. SOBLE, Times Staff Writer
William Albert Reinke, a high school dropout and convicted felon who received top-secret Pentagon clearance to work on the stealth bomber program, was sentenced Monday to five years in prison for defrauding the government. Reinke, 56, of Brea was also ordered to repay $144,000 that the U.S. attorney's office says he overcharged the government on stealth bomber subcontracts he secured for Los Angeles-based Northrop Corp. "I find it astonishing, almost frightening, that a person of Mr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 15, 1986 | WILLIAM OVEREND, Times Staff Writer
U.S. Atty. Robert C. Bonner was in a tough mood last July as he announced a record number of defense industry fraud indictments in Los Angeles and denounced defense kickbacks and bribery as a "cancer" on the nation. Nineteen former purchasing agents and suppliers involved in subcontracts on some of the nation's most sensitive military projects had been caught in what Bonner described as "the largest, most sweeping investigation ever undertaken" into defense industry fraud.
NEWS
July 17, 1988 | KIM MURPHY, Times Staff Writer
It was bidding time again at Hughes Aircraft Co., and this time purchasing supervisor Philip Kaiser told a parts supplier that he did not want another European vacation. This time, he wanted a Chevrolet Camaro Berlinetta. But the supplier, which had already spent $11,000 sending Kaiser to Europe twice to obtain business from Hughes, balked. As the FBI secretly recorded the conversations, the parts supplier continued to resist demands to pay for the car.
NEWS
November 22, 1987 | KIM MURPHY, Times Staff Writer
"The law does not define fraud; it needs no definition. It is as old as falsehood and as versatile as human ingenuity," a federal appeals court once suggested in the hope of laying to rest centuries of argument over what it means to dupe a man out of his horse. Laws proscribing all manner of pyramid schemes, lottery devices, tax "savings" plans and miracle cures have passed on and off the books.
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