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Ralph Bakshi

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July 27, 1988 | DAVID WHARTON, Times Staff Writer
Ralph Bakshi is chain-smoking Vantages and eating soup from a plastic foam cup. "I've gotten reviews that would make most directors weep," he says, "and still I'm finding it a battle." He fidgets and curses frequently as he muses about cartoons. "It's insane how some people perceive me," he says. "I'm a very square guy. I really am."
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 2010 | By Noel Murray
The Lord of the Rings Original Animated Classic Warner, $19.98; Blu-ray, $29.99 Peter Jackson's blockbuster "The Lord of the Rings" trilogy finally comes to Blu-ray this week, but only in a single box set, and without the extended cuts. While fans wait for the inevitable wave of expanded single-disc editions and collector's sets, they can get a temporary "Rings" fix from Ralph Bakshi's flawed but fascinating 1978 animated version. Though Bakshi got to complete only half of what was intended to be a two-movie epic -- and though the pace of the film is so brisk that it misses the nuance of author J.R.R.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 6, 1992 | FRANK ROSE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's been two decades since Ralph Bakshi burst onto the scene, a guerrilla animator out of Walt Disney's worst nightmares. For a few years in the early '70s, beginning with the X-rated "Fritz the Cat," Bakshi created an outrageous string of animated features that simultaneously won him recognition from the Museum of Modern Art and notoriety as the man who dragged cartoons into the gutter. "If Snow White suddenly opened a brothel, she might find herself in a Bakshi feature," one critic observed.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 2010 | By Noel Murray
Cloudy With a Chance of Meatballs Sony, $28.96/$34.95; Blu-ray, $39.95 Judi and Ron Barrett's 1978 picture book imagines a town where food rains from the sky and what happens to its residents when a meal-storm forces an evacuation. The feature-length computer-animated adaptation expands on the Barretts' concept, adding a hapless scientist and a succession of disaster-movie-style action sequences. Writer-directors Phil Lord and Christopher Miller have a fine sense of whimsy, but even at under 90 minutes, the movie is overstuffed.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 1989 | Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Production has begun on the first prime-time animated series in more than a decade. NBC's "Hound Town," a half-hour comedy set in a typical American suburb, "concerns the lives that dogs have of which humans are unaware," according to director Ralph Bakshi, who added: "The dogs have their own views of humans and ultimately turn out to be more civilized than we are." The series is tentatively scheduled for a Friday night time slot.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 2000
I read with great interest Michael Mallory's article on women in animation ("Move Over, Old Men," March 19), as my mother, Helen Jordan, was an inker and painter at Disney from 1937 to 1982, never once seeing her name in the credits of the films on which she worked. It's wonderful, then, to see women now having such an impact, but I also think accolades should go to those many women without whom animation classics would not have reached the screen. The only person to give my mother screen credit was Ralph Bakshi, who called her the "steadiest hand in the business."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2005 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
After fighting producers, the studios and even fellow animators for more than 25 years, maverick filmmaker Ralph Bakshi left Hollywood and moved to Santa Fe, N.M., where he has spent the past decade making his living as a painter. "I was doing adult animation when no one really understood what I was doing," says Bakshi, now 66. "That caused a lot of problems.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 1987 | CHARLES SOLOMON
Following is a review of today's screening in the Los Angeles Animation Celebration: "Coonskin" (USA, 1975), Nuart Theater, 11:30 p.m.: 1 hour, 22 minutes. "Coonskin" provoked a small riot when director Ralph Bakshi showed it as a work-in-progress at the Museum of Modern Art in 1974: Representatives from the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE) objected to its depictions of blacks. After a brief run in 1975, the film was consigned to the shelf, where it has remained ever since.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 2010 | By Noel Murray
Cloudy With a Chance of Meatballs Sony, $28.96/$34.95; Blu-ray, $39.95 Judi and Ron Barrett's 1978 picture book imagines a town where food rains from the sky and what happens to its residents when a meal-storm forces an evacuation. The feature-length computer-animated adaptation expands on the Barretts' concept, adding a hapless scientist and a succession of disaster-movie-style action sequences. Writer-directors Phil Lord and Christopher Miller have a fine sense of whimsy, but even at under 90 minutes, the movie is overstuffed.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 2010 | By Noel Murray
The Lord of the Rings Original Animated Classic Warner, $19.98; Blu-ray, $29.99 Peter Jackson's blockbuster "The Lord of the Rings" trilogy finally comes to Blu-ray this week, but only in a single box set, and without the extended cuts. While fans wait for the inevitable wave of expanded single-disc editions and collector's sets, they can get a temporary "Rings" fix from Ralph Bakshi's flawed but fascinating 1978 animated version. Though Bakshi got to complete only half of what was intended to be a two-movie epic -- and though the pace of the film is so brisk that it misses the nuance of author J.R.R.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 2008 | Charles Solomon, Special to The Times
IT'S strange to recall that during the early 1970s Ralph Bakshi was hailed as the filmmaker who would revitalize the American animated feature. Thirty-five years later, except for "Fritz the Cat" (1972) and the cult favorite "Wizards" (1977), Bakshi's films are largely forgotten. Contemporary directors look to Walt Disney, Hayao Miyazaki and the Pixar artists for inspiration rather than to the creator of "American Pop" and "Cool World."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2005 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
After fighting producers, the studios and even fellow animators for more than 25 years, maverick filmmaker Ralph Bakshi left Hollywood and moved to Santa Fe, N.M., where he has spent the past decade making his living as a painter. "I was doing adult animation when no one really understood what I was doing," says Bakshi, now 66. "That caused a lot of problems.
NEWS
March 14, 2002 | MICHAEL MALLORY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Amid all the Oscar buzz surrounding Peter Jackson's blockbuster adaptation of J.R.R. Tolkien's "The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring," one fact has gone largely unnoticed: The film that has garnered 13 Academy Award nominations has also joined "Cleopatra" (1963), "Romeo and Juliet" (1968) and "Heaven Can Wait" (1978) in the tiny category of best picture nominees that are new versions of earlier films.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 2000
I read with great interest Michael Mallory's article on women in animation ("Move Over, Old Men," March 19), as my mother, Helen Jordan, was an inker and painter at Disney from 1937 to 1982, never once seeing her name in the credits of the films on which she worked. It's wonderful, then, to see women now having such an impact, but I also think accolades should go to those many women without whom animation classics would not have reached the screen. The only person to give my mother screen credit was Ralph Bakshi, who called her the "steadiest hand in the business."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 6, 1992 | FRANK ROSE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's been two decades since Ralph Bakshi burst onto the scene, a guerrilla animator out of Walt Disney's worst nightmares. For a few years in the early '70s, beginning with the X-rated "Fritz the Cat," Bakshi created an outrageous string of animated features that simultaneously won him recognition from the Museum of Modern Art and notoriety as the man who dragged cartoons into the gutter. "If Snow White suddenly opened a brothel, she might find herself in a Bakshi feature," one critic observed.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 1989 | Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Production has begun on the first prime-time animated series in more than a decade. NBC's "Hound Town," a half-hour comedy set in a typical American suburb, "concerns the lives that dogs have of which humans are unaware," according to director Ralph Bakshi, who added: "The dogs have their own views of humans and ultimately turn out to be more civilized than we are." The series is tentatively scheduled for a Friday night time slot.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 17, 1986 | Charles Champlin, Times Art Critic
It was almost three years ago ---- August 24, 1983 ---- that Ralph Bakshi called to say goodby. The animator who made history in 1971 with "Fritz the Cat," the first X-rated cartoon feature, was burned out, he said. He'd bought a house beside a pond in a village called South Salem in the far exurbs of New York and he was going to paint, opting out of Hollywood. Bakshi called again a few days ago. He is back in town, refreshed and renewed and ready to have at it again.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 2008 | Charles Solomon, Special to The Times
IT'S strange to recall that during the early 1970s Ralph Bakshi was hailed as the filmmaker who would revitalize the American animated feature. Thirty-five years later, except for "Fritz the Cat" (1972) and the cult favorite "Wizards" (1977), Bakshi's films are largely forgotten. Contemporary directors look to Walt Disney, Hayao Miyazaki and the Pixar artists for inspiration rather than to the creator of "American Pop" and "Cool World."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 27, 1988 | DAVID WHARTON, Times Staff Writer
Ralph Bakshi is chain-smoking Vantages and eating soup from a plastic foam cup. "I've gotten reviews that would make most directors weep," he says, "and still I'm finding it a battle." He fidgets and curses frequently as he muses about cartoons. "It's insane how some people perceive me," he says. "I'm a very square guy. I really am."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 1987 | CHARLES SOLOMON
Following is a review of today's screening in the Los Angeles Animation Celebration: "Coonskin" (USA, 1975), Nuart Theater, 11:30 p.m.: 1 hour, 22 minutes. "Coonskin" provoked a small riot when director Ralph Bakshi showed it as a work-in-progress at the Museum of Modern Art in 1974: Representatives from the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE) objected to its depictions of blacks. After a brief run in 1975, the film was consigned to the shelf, where it has remained ever since.
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