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Ralph Cavanagh

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BUSINESS
April 22, 1991 | MARTHA GROVES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It takes a bundle of energy to get people to use less energy. Just ask Ralph Cavanagh, a Natural Resources Defense Council attorney in San Francisco who for the last dozen years has been a tireless, articulate advocate of wise energy production and use in California and the Pacific Northwest.
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BUSINESS
April 22, 1991 | MARTHA GROVES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It takes a bundle of energy to get people to use less energy. Just ask Ralph Cavanagh, a Natural Resources Defense Council attorney in San Francisco who for the last dozen years has been a tireless, articulate advocate of wise energy production and use in California and the Pacific Northwest.
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OPINION
January 6, 2002
I'm still scratching my head after reading Alexander Cockburn's Dec. 28 commentary, "An Enron Tale of Strange Bedfellows." The Natural Resources Defense Council was part of a coalition of environmental and consumer groups that negotiated an agreement with merging companies Enron and Portland General Electric on future investment in energy efficiency, renewable energy, watershed restoration and low-income energy services. Cockburn is indignant that I said I trusted Enron to execute the agreement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 25, 2000
Re "The State's Electricity Markets Need to Be Mended, Not Ended," Commentary, Oct. 18: Ralph Cavanagh's plea to mend, rather than end, electricity deregulation fails to acknowledge the reason for last summer's price gouging in San Diego and the impending rate increases for Edison and PG&E customers: Private utility companies do not care about customers (they retain a virtual monopoly) and they don't care about the environment (unless it's immediately profitable to care). Unlike public power agencies such as the DWP, the private utilities are only accountable to their shareholders.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 20, 1990 | MARLA CONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A top Bush Administration energy official urged the American public Wednesday to save one gallon of gasoline a week, saying that effort would be "more than enough" to compensate for the loss of oil from Iraq and Kuwait. Assistant U.S. Energy Secretary Michael Davis said the political crisis in the oil-rich Middle East has not created an energy crisis.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 1990 | BERKLEY HUDSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A state-of-the-art energy conservation facility that includes a "house of the future" opened in Irwindale to favorable reviews Monday from public officials, environmentalists and scientists.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 1985
A vigorous new debate is under way over the future of electric power in the United States. In particular, the nuclear-power industry has mounted an aggressive publicity campaign to win new friends and to persuade the public that nuclear power is the only certain provider of the nation's future electricity needs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 11, 2007 | Marc Lifsher, Times Staff Writer
A controversial member of the California Public Utilities Commission, serving on an interim basis, is set to win state Senate confirmation despite opposition from consumer groups. On Wednesday, the powerful Rules Committee sent the governor's nomination of Rachelle B. Chong of San Francisco to the full Senate for its expected approval today.
BUSINESS
July 10, 1995 | MICHAEL PARRISH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The broadest coalition yet to emerge in the tangled debate over electric-utility deregulation today will endorse the state Public Utility Commission's majority proposal to limit competition to a wholesale market. More than 80 utilities and groups representing small businesses, consumers, environmentalists, labor and minorities will throw their weight behind the draft policy favored by three of the four PUC commissioners.
BUSINESS
October 24, 2006 | Marc Lifsher, Times Staff Writer
The bipartisan good feeling that followed the passage last month of a landmark California law to reduce global warming is starting to sour. Harsh words came Monday from the Senate president pro tem, who in a letter accused the governor of subverting parts of the law with an executive order to fast-track plans for a system that would allow industry to sell or trade pollution credits.
BUSINESS
June 8, 1994 | MICHAEL PARRISH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The state's bright vision for lower power bills through electric utility deregulation is likely to be tied up in years of legal and technical wrangling, federal and industry officials said Tuesday. In their first round of written comments on the ambitious deregulation proposal sketched by the state Public Utilities Commission in April, virtually all interested parties are leveling major complaints.
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