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Ralph Eugene Meatyard

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February 4, 1993 | CATHY CURTIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"There is this moment in all (Ralph Eugene) Meatyard's work," art critic Jonathan Green said Tuesday, "where the world can dissolve into something that is terrifying--maybe children's bad dreams, maybe death itself." Even children, frequent subjects in Meatyard's photographs, live "on the edge," Green said, threatened by "extinction, darkness and childhood fears--the grown-up world of terror."
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 1993 | CATHY CURTIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"There is this moment in all (Ralph Eugene) Meatyard's work," art critic Jonathan Green said Tuesday, "where the world can dissolve into something that is terrifying--maybe children's bad dreams, maybe death itself." Even children, frequent subjects in Meatyard's photographs, live "on the edge," Green said, threatened by "extinction, darkness and childhood fears--the grown-up world of terror."
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 18, 1992 | CATHY CURTIS
A small male Earthling hovers in a shadowy field of mushrooms. His blurry fingers graze the edge of a floating metal dome incised with thin grooves. Is this a mystical revelation? An otherworldly sighting from the cover of the Weekly World News? A still from a surreal film? Actually it's a boy with a hubcap, photographed by Ralph Eugene Meatyard in the late '50s. Meatyard, at his best, had the knack of transforming aspects of ordinary life into darkly enigmatic events.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 18, 1992 | CATHY CURTIS
A small male Earthling hovers in a shadowy field of mushrooms. His blurry fingers graze the edge of a floating metal dome incised with thin grooves. Is this a mystical revelation? An otherworldly sighting from the cover of the Weekly World News? A still from a surreal film? Actually it's a boy with a hubcap, photographed by Ralph Eugene Meatyard in the late '50s. Meatyard, at his best, had the knack of transforming aspects of ordinary life into darkly enigmatic events.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 1989 | CATHY CURTIS, Times Staff Writer
"Picture a very dark alley illuminated by the light from somebody's kitchen or a flashing neon sign or one low street lamp," Eileen Cowin writes about her 36-foot-long series of silver gelatin photographs, curving seamlessly across a darkened room in the Cal State Fullerton Art Gallery. "There on a cold damp night . . .Alfred Hitchcock meets Rene Magritte, Raymond Chandler collides with Edward Hopper. . . ."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 29, 2006 | Leah Ollman, Special to The Times
WHAT kind of an artist inspires a brilliant, oddball band like They Might Be Giants to write an art historical ditty in his honor? A brilliant, oddball artist like James Ensor, whose work, after more than 100 years, remains refreshingly strange and caustic. "Meet James Ensor, / Belgium's famous painter. / Dig him up and shake his hand, / appreciate the man," starts the 1994 song. It goes on to mention that Ensor lived with his mother and repeated himself, both of which are true.
NEWS
December 24, 1992 | CATHY CURTIS, Cathy Curtis covers art for The Times Orange County Edition.
They let you come to the grown-ups' party, but you have to stay upstairs. When the guests gossip on the phone the next day, they don't mention you. The newspaper stories leave your names out. Oh well, at least they let you in the door.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 29, 1999 | LEAH OLLMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Given the way our culture has made a fetish of multi-tasking, it's no wonder that Maya Lin has become a household name. Since designing the stunningly effective Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington, D.C., as an undergraduate student in architecture, Lin has created several other publicly sited artworks, fulfilled a number of notable architectural commissions, designed a line of furniture for Knoll and created a body of sculptural work.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 1999 | LEAH OLLMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A heavy hand is at work in Ralph Eugene Meatyard's pictures--and not just the hand of the artist, who frequently posed and staged his photographs, but the invisible choreographer of life itself. Crystallized moments of intense potency occur both by calculation and by nature, and Meat-yard (1925-72) had an exquisite ability to recognize their poetic potential.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 1993 | CATHY CURTIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
What makes a good exhibition? Let's put it this way: Organizing compelling material in a fresh and keenly analytical way is the only way to get on the charts. I hate to burst the Clintonesque bubble of optimism for the new year, but--from this early vantage point, at least--the roster of 1993 art exhibits in Orange County doesn't exactly constitute a critic's hit parade. The problem isn't a lack of "blockbusters," mind you.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 1, 1993 | CATHY CURTIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Call it "The Year of the Upstart" in Orange County art. While some well-known institutions offered cautious, confused or vacuous programming, other venues cut loose and got clever. (And please don't heap all your blame for the negative portion of that assessment on the disastrous economy; I'll buy that only if you can prove to me that it costs more to think creatively and credit the viewing public with some smarts and a healthy dose of attitude.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 30, 1991 | CATHY CURTIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Well, there's been a good bit of moaning and groaning in this space about dismal 1991, but next year's art offerings sound remarkably promising for these lean times. Still, it's worth noting that most of the larger exhibits are imports, assembled by out-of-town institutions and sent on the traveling circuit. There's certainly nothing wrong with that, but top museum honors inevitably go to fine shows produced by the home team.
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