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Ralph Fiennes

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ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 2010
Fiennes to direct film After two years of struggling to win funding amid the global financial crisis, actor Ralph Fiennes said Wednesday that he would start filming his directorial debut of a Shakespeare tragedy next week in Serbia. Filming of "Coriolanus" will start in Belgrade, Serbia, on March 17 in the country's highest-profile movie project in decades, and is expected to last two months, the British actor said in an interview. In addition to directing, Fiennes will play the leading role of Coriolanus, a Roman general who betrays his native city Rome and allies with his sworn enemy Tullus Aufidius for revenge.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2014 | Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Wes Anderson sweats the details. All of them, all the time, to an extent that can be maddening. But not in "The Grand Budapest Hotel," where the writer-director's familiar style blends with a group of unexpected factors to create a magnificently cockeyed entertainment. With credits including "Moonrise Kingdom," "The Darjeeling Limited" and the stop-motion animation "Fantastic Mr. Fox," Anderson works so assiduously to create obsessively detailed on-screen worlds that the effect has sometimes been hermetic, even stifling.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 9, 2013 | By Oliver Gettell
Finding the right actor to play the larger-than-life role of Charles Dickens in the new biopic "The Invisible Woman" proved to be a challenge for sophomore director Ralph Fiennes. After his first choice turned him down, Fiennes reluctantly went with a two-time Academy Award nominee: Ralph Fiennes. At the Envelope Screening Series , Fiennes, co-star Felicity Jones and Times reporter Glenn Whipp talked about Fiennes' working on both sides of the camera. "He kept on bugging me that he wanted to play the part," Fiennes said, jokingly referring to himself.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 2014 | By Henry Chu and Oliver Gettell
One of the chief pleasures of watching a Wes Anderson movie is being immersed in the idiosyncratic, slightly off-kilter worlds he creates. The director's latest effort, "The Grand Budapest Hotel, whisks the audience to a fictional country in pre-World War II Europe to follow the escapades of a famed concierge seeking to recover a famous Renaissance painting with the help of his trusted lobby boy. After the film opened the Berlin International Film...
ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 2013 | By Mark Olsen
The Film Society of Lincoln Center announced that Cate Blanchett and Ralph Fiennes will be honored with gala tribute events during the upcoming New York Film Festival. Fiennes and Blanchett appeared together onscreen in the 1997 film "Oscar and Lucinda. " The Oct. 2 tribute for Blanchett comes as she has been receiving raves for her work in Woody Allen's "Blue Jasmine," with her performance already considered among the front-runners for this year's lead actress Oscar. (Which may make her stop at the NYFF part of a long march of awards appearances for her in the coming months.)
ENTERTAINMENT
December 28, 2013 | By Susan King
After making his feature directorial debut in 2011 with his fierce, unsparing adaptation of Shakespeare's "Coriolanus," Ralph Fiennes is in the director's chair once again for "The Invisible Woman," which opens Christmas Day. Based on the book by Claire Tomalin, the romantic drama chronicles the relationship between Charles Dickens and actress Nelly Ternan (Felicity Jones). The writer of such literary masterpieces as "Great Expectations," "A Tale of Two Cities" and "A Christmas Carol" was married with 10 children when he met the teenager, who toiled on stage with her mother and two older sisters.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 5, 1994 | DAVID GRITTEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Ralph Fiennes had agreed to meet for morning coffee at the august Savoy Hotel, but when the appointed hour arrived, he was glowering in the foyer. He was dressed smartly in leather jacket, striped shirt and bolo tie, but this ensemble did not please the Savoy; its impenetrable dress codes dictated he must don a formal coat. We agreed to decamp to the more relaxed Waldorf, 200 yards down the street.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 2008 | Sam Adams, Special to The Times
Ralph FIENNES is not an easy man to get close to. Generally regarded as one of the finest actors of his generation, breathing the same rarefied air as the likes of Daniel Day-Lewis, he is similarly reluctant to engage in the cycle of personal revelation that usually accompanies publicizing a movie.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 2000 | KRISTIN HOHENADEL, Kristin Hohenadel is a regular contributor to Calendar
Ralph Fiennes does not make an entrance so much as he materializes. His tennis-shoe-clad feet make no sound, and he is slighter than you would imagine, his body barely perceptible beneath his baggy rehearsal clothes. It's a late May afternoon at the Gainsborough Studios, the ruin of a film studio once used by Hitchcock that has been converted into the venue for Fiennes' much-anticipated return to the London stage.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 2008 | Cristy Lytal
In writer-director Martin McDonagh's hit-man comedy "In Bruges," opening in theaters Friday, the audience hears Ralph Fiennes long before they see him. During the film's first act, he exists only as a disembodied voice communicating via telephone or expletive-packed missive from afar.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 28, 2013 | By Susan King
After making his feature directorial debut in 2011 with his fierce, unsparing adaptation of Shakespeare's "Coriolanus," Ralph Fiennes is in the director's chair once again for "The Invisible Woman," which opens Christmas Day. Based on the book by Claire Tomalin, the romantic drama chronicles the relationship between Charles Dickens and actress Nelly Ternan (Felicity Jones). The writer of such literary masterpieces as "Great Expectations," "A Tale of Two Cities" and "A Christmas Carol" was married with 10 children when he met the teenager, who toiled on stage with her mother and two older sisters.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 2013 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
The numerous works of Charles Dickens, perhaps the English language's preeminent storyteller, have been turned into films and television over and over again for more than a century. "The Invisible Woman," however, might be the first film to be made about the great man's private life, and it turns out to be as compellingly dramatic as anything he put on the page. More than that, as directed by and starring the superb Ralph Fiennes as Dickens and splendidly assisted by Britain's Felicity Jones as the title character, "The Invisible Woman" is an exceptional film about love, longing and regret.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 2013 | By Oliver Gettell
Actor-director Ralph Fiennes goes deep into the role of Charles Dickens in the new biopic "The Invisible Woman," which dramatizes the iconic author's love affair with young actress Nelly Ternan while at the height of his fame. You could reasonably imagine Fiennes being a lifelong devotee of Dickens -- but you would be dead wrong. Speaking at the  Envelope Screening Series  along with co-star Felicity Jones and Times reporter Glenn Whipp, Fiennes admitted that he was a Dickens novice before getting involved in the film.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 9, 2013 | By Oliver Gettell
Finding the right actor to play the larger-than-life role of Charles Dickens in the new biopic "The Invisible Woman" proved to be a challenge for sophomore director Ralph Fiennes. After his first choice turned him down, Fiennes reluctantly went with a two-time Academy Award nominee: Ralph Fiennes. At the Envelope Screening Series , Fiennes, co-star Felicity Jones and Times reporter Glenn Whipp talked about Fiennes' working on both sides of the camera. "He kept on bugging me that he wanted to play the part," Fiennes said, jokingly referring to himself.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 26, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
In the Victorian era, not many people people knew that their beloved superstar author Charles Dickens had a long affair with a young actress, Nelly Ternan. But in the 20th century, the relationship was detailed in a number of biographies -- including 1991's "The Invisible Woman. " Which is now a movie -- coming to an art theater near you this holiday season, thanks to director and star Ralph Fiennes. Fiennes plays Dickens, and as you can see in the trailer above, he captures some of the author's magnetism and massive popularity.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 2013 | By Mark Olsen
The Film Society of Lincoln Center announced that Cate Blanchett and Ralph Fiennes will be honored with gala tribute events during the upcoming New York Film Festival. Fiennes and Blanchett appeared together onscreen in the 1997 film "Oscar and Lucinda. " The Oct. 2 tribute for Blanchett comes as she has been receiving raves for her work in Woody Allen's "Blue Jasmine," with her performance already considered among the front-runners for this year's lead actress Oscar. (Which may make her stop at the NYFF part of a long march of awards appearances for her in the coming months.)
ENTERTAINMENT
December 16, 1999 | DAVID GRITTEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Talk about a family affair. Seven years ago, actor Ralph Fiennes told his sister Martha, a fledgling filmmaker, about a book he had read while at drama school: "Eugene Onegin," the great 1830 verse novel by Russian author Aleksandr Pushkin. "It was so naive, when I look back at it," she recalled. "Ralph said, 'Martha, I've read this book. I think it would make a great film.' So I read it, called him and said, 'You're right, it'd be great.' That's how it began."
NEWS
December 15, 2011 | By Mark Olsen, Special to the Los Angeles Times
If the crush of film awards season can be good for something — really, it can! — it is simply getting people to watch films they might otherwise let slip by them. Whether it's reaching deeper into that stack of screeners or actually checking them out in an honest-to-goodness movie theater, the wave of awards-ready titles can broaden the reach of some audience members. Nowhere can this added attention be felt more strongly than with regard to the work of relatively new filmmakers, whether they are young or directing for the first time.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 2, 2011 | BETSY SHARKEY, FILM CRITIC
Actor, and now director, Ralph Fiennes has given us war and politics on a grand operatic scale in his ambitious and at times thrilling rendering of one of Shakespeare's lesser known works -- "Coriolanus. " For his first foray behind the camera, Fiennes has started off right by surrounding himself with a superlative cast including Vanessa Redgrave, Gerard Butler, Jessica Chastain and an exceptional Brian Cox. He has taken the title role for himself, Caius Martius Coriolanus, in the story of a war hero wading into the political arena only to be undone by his hubris.
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