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Ralph Horowitz

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OPINION
November 5, 2005
Re "Seeds of Dissension Linger," Oct. 31 Instead of being thankful for being allowed to use someone else's land to grow food, these ungrateful people think they somehow have a right to the South Central Community Garden. Maybe someone should explain to them that land is not for the taking. The owner has every right to put a warehouse on the land, as he is the one who pays the property taxes, not these city farmers. I hope these people get thrown out and learn that you have to earn what you get in this country.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 18, 2008 | David Zahniser, Times Staff Writer
Two years after it was bulldozed, the 14-acre Los Angeles community garden known as the South Central Farm is being developed for a clothing chain with strong ties to Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa. Forever 21, one of the city's fastest-growing women's apparel businesses, wants to operate a warehouse and distribution center on the site owned by real estate developer Ralph Horowitz. Supporters of the garden -- still angry that Horowitz tore it up despite support from such Hollywood luminaries as Daryl Hannah and Danny Glover -- have been trying for weeks to kill the proposed project by demanding more rigorous environmental review.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 10, 2006
Al Martinez ["Celeb Protesters, Where's the Do-Re-Mi?," June 2] has it right: In these times, "the value of property outweighs the needs of the people." If these 14 acres in the heart of South-Central L.A., now divided into small family farms, goes to its legal owner -- and how Ralph Horowitz became this is an interesting question -- a community space will be lost, a way of life destroyed, a wonderful source of vegetables gone for these families and anyone who wants to go by and buy them.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 27, 2006 | Stephen Clark, Times Staff Writer
A judge ruled Wednesday that a developer legally owns the land in South Los Angeles where residents had been growing fruits and vegetables for 14 years. Judge Helen I. Bendix told a packed courtroom that the city's 2003 sale of the disputed 14 acres back to developer Ralph Horowitz was legal. Some of the gardeners blinked away tears, others dropped their faces into their hands.
OPINION
June 15, 2006
Re "Lights, Camera, Eviction," editorial, June 14 It is true that some in Hollywood loaned their star power to the effort to save the South Central farm. But that is not the story. The story is one built on the idea of providing food at a neighborhood level, about community support in an inhospitable place. This was not a story cooked up by Hollywood; it was built by good people, and Hollywood was attracted to it. For The Times to just throw up its hands and say developer Ralph Horowitz "is entirely within his rights" is cold and cynical.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 18, 2008 | David Zahniser, Times Staff Writer
Two years after it was bulldozed, the 14-acre Los Angeles community garden known as the South Central Farm is being developed for a clothing chain with strong ties to Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa. Forever 21, one of the city's fastest-growing women's apparel businesses, wants to operate a warehouse and distribution center on the site owned by real estate developer Ralph Horowitz. Supporters of the garden -- still angry that Horowitz tore it up despite support from such Hollywood luminaries as Daryl Hannah and Danny Glover -- have been trying for weeks to kill the proposed project by demanding more rigorous environmental review.
OPINION
March 27, 2004
Re "L.A. Should Cultivate This Rare Urban Seed," Commentary, March 23: How interesting that we are now at a place, in our forced egalitarianism, that a property owner has fewer rights to his property than a group of squatters. "Can all sides win?" Robert Gottlieb and James Rojas ask. "Yes" is the response, "by relocating the owner." Incredible! How would Gottlieb and Rojas feel about having to deed their homes to squatters who appropriated their properties while they were on vacation, and being forced to relocate?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 27, 2006 | Stephen Clark, Times Staff Writer
A judge ruled Wednesday that a developer legally owns the land in South Los Angeles where residents had been growing fruits and vegetables for 14 years. Judge Helen I. Bendix told a packed courtroom that the city's 2003 sale of the disputed 14 acres back to developer Ralph Horowitz was legal. Some of the gardeners blinked away tears, others dropped their faces into their hands.
REAL ESTATE
September 14, 1986
Charles Frandson and Ralph Horowitz, two private investors, have purchased Glendale Federal Plaza in Sherman Oaks from Glendale Federal Savings & Loan Assn. for $10 million. The plaza, located at 13700 Riverside Drive, contains a 21,829-square-foot office building and 23,381 square feet of retail space. A 30,000-square-foot Pritikin Health and Fitness Center is also on the 3.06-acre site.
OPINION
October 22, 2003
Re "L.A. Needs These Oases," editorial, Oct. 18: Anyone who has ever grown anything can tell you that you don't throw some seed on a vacant lot and sit back and await the bounty. The people who have developed the "loaned" ground at 41st and Alameda streets have poured 11 years of their sweat, compost, fertilizers and souls into creating this oasis. Isn't there something that can be done to compensate Ralph Horowitz, who I'm sure is an honorable man, for his property so that the garden can continue?
OPINION
June 15, 2006
Re "Lights, Camera, Eviction," editorial, June 14 It is true that some in Hollywood loaned their star power to the effort to save the South Central farm. But that is not the story. The story is one built on the idea of providing food at a neighborhood level, about community support in an inhospitable place. This was not a story cooked up by Hollywood; it was built by good people, and Hollywood was attracted to it. For The Times to just throw up its hands and say developer Ralph Horowitz "is entirely within his rights" is cold and cynical.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 10, 2006
Al Martinez ["Celeb Protesters, Where's the Do-Re-Mi?," June 2] has it right: In these times, "the value of property outweighs the needs of the people." If these 14 acres in the heart of South-Central L.A., now divided into small family farms, goes to its legal owner -- and how Ralph Horowitz became this is an interesting question -- a community space will be lost, a way of life destroyed, a wonderful source of vegetables gone for these families and anyone who wants to go by and buy them.
OPINION
November 5, 2005
Re "Seeds of Dissension Linger," Oct. 31 Instead of being thankful for being allowed to use someone else's land to grow food, these ungrateful people think they somehow have a right to the South Central Community Garden. Maybe someone should explain to them that land is not for the taking. The owner has every right to put a warehouse on the land, as he is the one who pays the property taxes, not these city farmers. I hope these people get thrown out and learn that you have to earn what you get in this country.
OPINION
March 27, 2004
Re "L.A. Should Cultivate This Rare Urban Seed," Commentary, March 23: How interesting that we are now at a place, in our forced egalitarianism, that a property owner has fewer rights to his property than a group of squatters. "Can all sides win?" Robert Gottlieb and James Rojas ask. "Yes" is the response, "by relocating the owner." Incredible! How would Gottlieb and Rojas feel about having to deed their homes to squatters who appropriated their properties while they were on vacation, and being forced to relocate?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 13, 2006 | Tanya Caldwell, Times Staff Writer
South Los Angeles urban farmers scored their first victory in court Wednesday in their last-ditch effort to regain what used to be a lush community garden in a rough industrial area. Judge Helen I. Bendix ruled that developer Ralph Horowitz could not exclude evidence about the deal he made with the city of Los Angeles in 2003.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 18, 1997 | SYLVIA L. OLIANDE
The developer of a proposed shopping center on Agoura Road presented his idea to the public for the first time at an joint meeting of the City Council, Planning Commission and Architectural Review Board. Although they appeared initially pleased with the design, some officials expressed concern Wednesday about the look of the center's anchor, a 127,000-square-foot Target store, and how it's massive rectangular size would fit in with the village-like design of the rest of the center.
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