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Ralph J Bunche

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 1999
The California Community Foundation issued a $100,000 interest-free loan Tuesday to allow a nonprofit group to restore the boyhood home of Ralph J. Bunche, the Nobel Peace Prize winner. The home, on East 40th Place, has been declared a cultural landmark but remains boarded up and covered in graffiti because of a funding delay in City Hall.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 2014 | By Greg Braxton
Hollywood still isn't reflecting the nation's diversity in its entertainment products, and that omission is costing the industry considerable amounts in lost revenues. That's the main conclusion of a comprehensive report about diversity in the film and TV industry released Wednesday by UCLA's Ralph J. Bunche Center for African American Studies. The study, which is titled "2014 Hollywood Diversity Report: Making Sense of the Disconnect," finds that minorities and women are represented far below their corresponding percentages in the general population.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 12, 1999
Donning a hard hat and goggles, Mayor Richard Riordan joined a work crew Thursday in cleaning up the graffiti-marred boyhood home of Ralph J. Bunche, the first African American to win a Nobel Peace Prize. Riordan, who learned about the condition of the home from an article in Sunday's Times, blamed the city's slow-moving bureaucracy for holding up the funding to restore the home.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 28, 2001 | Cecilia Rasmussen
In the Los Angeles that existed before the civil rights movement, a black high school valedictorian from Watts was denied membership in a city honor society because of his race. More than a quarter-century later, he would return to the city of his youth as the winner of the Nobel Peace Prize. In the pantheon of world heroes, Ralph Johnson Bunche was the first person of color honored with the award that would later go to the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 28, 2001 | Cecilia Rasmussen
In the Los Angeles that existed before the civil rights movement, a black high school valedictorian from Watts was denied membership in a city honor society because of his race. More than a quarter-century later, he would return to the city of his youth as the winner of the Nobel Peace Prize. In the pantheon of world heroes, Ralph Johnson Bunche was the first person of color honored with the award that would later go to the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 2014 | By Greg Braxton
Hollywood still isn't reflecting the nation's diversity in its entertainment products, and that omission is costing the industry considerable amounts in lost revenues. That's the main conclusion of a comprehensive report about diversity in the film and TV industry released Wednesday by UCLA's Ralph J. Bunche Center for African American Studies. The study, which is titled "2014 Hollywood Diversity Report: Making Sense of the Disconnect," finds that minorities and women are represented far below their corresponding percentages in the general population.
NEWS
January 23, 1992
The UCLA Alumni Assn. has awarded merit scholarships to freshmen from underrepresented ethnic backgrounds through its Ralph J. Bunche Scholarship and Outreach Program. Winners of $1,000 scholarships include Nelly Amador of Glendale, Marc Douglas Butcher of Hacienda Heights, Elia Castellanos of Rosemead and Belinda Martinez of La Puente.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 8, 2003 | Olga R. Rodriguez, Times Staff Writer
Hundreds of students at South Los Angeles' Jefferson High School celebrated the legacy of former school valedictorian Ralph J. Bunche on Thursday, the grandson of a former slave who became the first black American to receive the Nobel Peace Prize. At the centenary commemoration of his birth, Bunche was remembered as a resolute man who, despite humble beginnings, became an international peacemaker best known for negotiating and drafting the 1949 Israeli-Arab armistice.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 13, 1990
For the second time in less than two weeks, large numbers of teachers at a Compton school have called in sick. Twenty of the 34 teachers at Ralph J. Bunche Middle School notified the district early Monday that they would not be in. On March 2, about half the teachers at Dominguez High School called in sick. Both schools are part of the Compton Unified School District, where teachers have been working without a contract since last year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 12, 1999
Donning a hard hat and goggles, Mayor Richard Riordan joined a work crew Thursday in cleaning up the graffiti-marred boyhood home of Ralph J. Bunche, the first African American to win a Nobel Peace Prize. Riordan, who learned about the condition of the home from an article in Sunday's Times, blamed the city's slow-moving bureaucracy for holding up the funding to restore the home.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 1999
The California Community Foundation issued a $100,000 interest-free loan Tuesday to allow a nonprofit group to restore the boyhood home of Ralph J. Bunche, the Nobel Peace Prize winner. The home, on East 40th Place, has been declared a cultural landmark but remains boarded up and covered in graffiti because of a funding delay in City Hall.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 4, 1991
Regarding the gang-related killing of 11-year-old Alejandro Vargas as he stood on the front lawn of Ralph J. Bunche Middle School in Compton on April 23: As an educator who works daily with high-risk students in primary and secondary schools throughout Los Angeles County, I believe that a reassessment of the Compton Unified School District's anti-gang efforts should be undertaken. Article I, Section 28(c), of the California Constitution prescribes that "all students and school staff have the inalienable right to attend schools that are safe, secure and peaceful."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 25, 2003 | Greg Braxton, Times Staff Writer
Despite the continuing increase of cultural diversity in American society, prime-time television continues to depict a largely black and white world, according to a new UCLA study released Tuesday. The report, titled "Prime Time in Black and White," concluded that both white and black Americans are overrepresented on prime time, albeit slightly, with whites accounting for about 74% of all characters, even though they constitute 69% of the nation's population.
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