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BUSINESS
May 10, 2010 | By Meg James, Los Angeles Times
Bridget Baker's corner office at NBC Universal in Burbank is adorned with photos of her hobnobbing with kings. In one, a young Baker stands alongside a silver-haired Johnny Carson, in another she is mugging with denim-clad Jay Leno, and in a third, she's rubbing shoulders with bow-tied and bushy-eyebrowed Ralph J. Roberts. Roberts, the 90-year-old co-founder of Comcast Corp., might not be a household name, but he and his son, Brian, the company's chief executive, are poised to exert more sway on the future of NBC than the network's royal comedians.
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BUSINESS
May 10, 2010 | By Meg James, Los Angeles Times
Bridget Baker's corner office at NBC Universal in Burbank is adorned with photos of her hobnobbing with kings. In one, a young Baker stands alongside a silver-haired Johnny Carson, in another she is mugging with denim-clad Jay Leno, and in a third, she's rubbing shoulders with bow-tied and bushy-eyebrowed Ralph J. Roberts. Roberts, the 90-year-old co-founder of Comcast Corp., might not be a household name, but he and his son, Brian, the company's chief executive, are poised to exert more sway on the future of NBC than the network's royal comedians.
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BUSINESS
October 27, 2006 | From Bloomberg News
Comcast Corp., the world's largest cable-television provider, said Thursday that third-quarter profit soared fivefold on the purchase of Adelphia Communications Corp. and record sales of telephone and digital television services. The Philadelphia-based company reported that net income jumped to $1.22 billion, or 58 cents a share, from $222 million, or 10 cents, a year earlier. Sales rose 22% to $6.43 billion.
BUSINESS
April 21, 2012 | By Meg James, Los Angeles Times
Comcast Corp.'s highest-paid executives — Chief Executive Brian Roberts and NBCUniversal chief Steve Burke — experienced compensation deflation last year. Roberts' pay package shrank 13.3% in 2011 to $26.9 million. That included a performance-based cash bonus of $5.5 million for the 52-year-old executive. Meanwhile, Burke's compensation dropped a whopping 32% to $23.7 million, which included a performance bonus of $6.7 million. The 53-year-old executive's amount fell dramatically last year, as it was the first time in three years that he did not collect a signing bonus.
BUSINESS
April 17, 1994 | KATHRYN HARRIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Brian L. Roberts started the hard way in the cable TV business, climbing poles to string cable for new subscribers' homes. He admits now that he had "trouble carrying the ladder. I was too weak. I was too skinny." As the boss's son, however, he survived that summer job and returned to the University of Pennsylvania's Wharton School. Competitive by nature, he became an All-American squash player. After his 1981 graduation, he returned to Comcast Corp. to work his way up a different ladder.
BUSINESS
July 14, 1994 | KATHRYN HARRIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Like a midair explosion, the scuttled merger plan of QVC Inc. and CBS Inc. has sent both companies spinning into play. Analysts on Wednesday said CBS could fetch more than $4 billion, while QVC might sell for nearly $3 billion if more than one bidder materializes. CBS formally confirmed Wednesday that it will not pursue QVC in the wake of a surprise $2.2-billion bid from Comcast Corp. for the home shopping channel.
BUSINESS
July 22, 1994 | KATHRYN HARRIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Comcast Corp. on Thursday bolstered its $2.2-billion bid for cable home shopping network QVC Inc. by enlisting a potential rival, Liberty Media Corp., as a minority partner. With a single stroke, Comcast reduced its own financial exposure and ensured that the shopping network will retain its largest customer, because Liberty Media is in the process of merging with Tele-Communications Inc., the nation's largest cable TV operator.
BUSINESS
July 2, 1996
This is a preliminary list of corporate executives planning to attend this year's highly coveted Sun Valley Conference, where media moguls and other corporate bigwigs rub shoulders, ride the rapids and often wind up making the biggest of the big entertainment deals. Allegheny & Western Energy Corp., John G. McMillian, chairman Amelior Foundation, Raymond G. Chambers, chairman America Online Inc., Steve Case, chairman and CEO Archer-Daniels-Midland Co., Dwayne O.
OPINION
June 2, 1996 | HARRY BERNSTEIN, Harry Bernstein was for many years The Times' labor writer
With many corporate chief executive officers raking in millions of dollars a year, it might seem both embarrassing and ineffective for companies to urge their workers to reject unions because of greedy union leaders. But despite their own record increases in salaries, bonuses and stock options, that old anti-union tactic is still very much in vogue.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 2014 | By Meg James and Joe Flint
Comcast Corp. already produces movies, television shows and national and local news programs while operating theme parks and the largest pay-TV system in the U.S. And now, with one bold stroke, the Philadelphia conglomerate could dominate the flow of information and entertainment into American homes with historically unprecedented power. Comcast's proposed $45.2-billion takeover of Time Warner Cable would allow it to provide television, telephone and Internet service and even home security systems to nearly 30 million homes across the country.  ON LOCATION: Where the cameras roll   The company's reach would encompass the nation's largest markets, among them Los Angeles, New York, Chicago, Philadelphia, Washington D.C. and San Francisco.
BUSINESS
May 29, 2011 | By Meg James, Los Angeles Times
Even in the most rarefied echelons of executive compensation, media mogul Sumner Redstone and his top lieutenants are in a league of their own. Philippe Dauman, chief executive of Viacom Inc., last year earned the distinction of drawing the largest compensation package in corporate America: $84.5 million. That was a 149% jump from the previous year, lifted by a one-time stock and options award totaling $54.4 million, which came courtesy of signing a new five-year employment agreement to run the company that boasts such prominent cable TV channels as MTV, Nickelodeon and Comedy Central and Hollywood movie studio Paramount Pictures.
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