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Ralph Johns

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 1998 | MIMI KO CRUZ
When Ralph Johns was alive, he tirelessly championed human rights but his name and his deeds went virtually unrecognized. That soon may change. John F. Reid, director of two mentoring programs at Cal State Fullerton, has started a campaign to make Johns' legacy of courage and determination a familiar story.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 1998 | MIMI KO CRUZ
When Ralph Johns was alive, he tirelessly championed human rights but his name and his deeds went virtually unrecognized. That soon may change. John F. Reid, director of two mentoring programs at Cal State Fullerton, has started a campaign to make Johns' legacy of courage and determination a familiar story.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 25, 1995 | MIMI KO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Ralph Johns vividly remembers the day 35 years ago when four black students staged a sit-in at a whites-only lunch counter at a Greensboro, N.C., Woolworth's store. For years he had been trying to persuade black students to commit such an act, recalled Johns, 79, a La Habra resident who then owned a clothing store in Greensboro, where he served as the first white vice president of the local chapter of the NAACP, organizing numerous demonstrations to promote human rights.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 25, 1995 | MIMI KO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Ralph Johns vividly remembers the day 35 years ago when four black students staged a sit-in at a whites-only lunch counter at a Greensboro, N.C., Woolworth's store. For years he had been trying to persuade black students to commit such an act, recalled Johns, 79, a La Habra resident who then owned a clothing store in Greensboro, where he served as the first white vice president of the local chapter of the NAACP, organizing numerous demonstrations to promote human rights.
NEWS
May 5, 1989 | GARRY ABRAMS, Times Staff Writer
Nearly 30 years ago, Ralph Johns reached out and touched history. It was a fleeting caress but he cannot forget the texture of the moment when he--a white merchant with a maverick streak wider than a freeway--helped four young black men walk into a Woolworth store in Greensboro, N.C., and sit down at the whites-only lunch counter. Today, few know what Johns did in helping open a new front in the struggle for civil rights. Now in his later years, Johns--who went broke, lost his first wife and was separated from his daughters for 13 years because he stood against the crowd--often expresses bitterness that the fame, glory, success and satisfaction that went to others in the movement have eluded him. "I just want somebody to say, 'Hey, Ralph, thanks a hell of a lot for what you've done,' " he said the other day as he thumbed through his carefully tended scrapbooks, archives of an impulsive, episodic, improbable life.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 24, 1989
Regarding the article, "Schuller Still Aiming High: Crystal Cathedral to Add 233-Foot Spire," I say shame! I'm so sick of watching preachers and evangelists making a mockery of God's word. The Bible tells me that many go into the preaching profession. But only a few are truly chosen. I see the Jimmy Swaggarts, Jimmy Bakkers, Oral Roberts and Robert Schullers supposing to give God the edification. But everything they seem to be doing besides preaching the word is to edify themselves for their own aggrandizement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 1986
Special circumstances allegations were filed Wednesday against a sailor charged with fatally stabbing two teen-age girls in Linda Vista and trying to kill their brother. Ralph Joseph Johns, 21, pleaded innocent before San Diego Municipal Court Judge Robert McDonald, who ordered him held without bail. Johns could be given the death penalty if he is convicted of first-degree murder in the Nov. 8 deaths of Lori Cvengros, 15, and Tina Cvengros, 18.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 29, 1986
A 21-year-old sailor pleaded guilty Monday to murdering two Linda Vista teen-age girls and attempting to kill their younger brother. Ralph Joseph Johns admitted to San Diego Superior Court Judge Richard Huffman that he fatally stabbed Lori Ann Cvengros, 15, and her sister, Tina, 18, and wounded 13-year-old David. "Did you intend to kill these two people?" Huffman asked Johns. "Yes, sir," Johns replied.
NEWS
October 17, 1995 | LILY DIZON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They couldn't make it to the Million Man March for various reasons, so a group of African Americans attended a discussion forum here Monday to voice their support for the historic rally being held in the nation's capital. At the city's Community Center, more than 50 people gathered to take the opportunity to meet other African Americans in a county where they make up only 2% of the population. They lamented about the racial divide between blacks and whites.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 16, 1987 | LILY ENG, Times Staff Writer
Lisa Cornish flashed a smile at the crowd of marchers as they broke into a spontaneous dance and held each other's arms during a UC Irvine rally Thursday celebrating the 58th anniversary of Martin Luther King Jr.'s birth. "This is for the man," Cornish, associate director of housing at UCI, shouted to the crowd as she beckoned others to join and the marchers chanted, "Happy birthday, Martin, happy birthday."
NEWS
May 5, 1989 | GARRY ABRAMS, Times Staff Writer
Nearly 30 years ago, Ralph Johns reached out and touched history. It was a fleeting caress but he cannot forget the texture of the moment when he--a white merchant with a maverick streak wider than a freeway--helped four young black men walk into a Woolworth store in Greensboro, N.C., and sit down at the whites-only lunch counter. Today, few know what Johns did in helping open a new front in the struggle for civil rights. Now in his later years, Johns--who went broke, lost his first wife and was separated from his daughters for 13 years because he stood against the crowd--often expresses bitterness that the fame, glory, success and satisfaction that went to others in the movement have eluded him. "I just want somebody to say, 'Hey, Ralph, thanks a hell of a lot for what you've done,' " he said the other day as he thumbed through his carefully tended scrapbooks, archives of an impulsive, episodic, improbable life.
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