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Ralph Lazo

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 1998
Thanks for the April 5 article about Ralph Lazo, who chose to join his Japanese friends when they were interned at Manzanar. I look at the class picture and wonder how many of those shown fought and died for the country that interned their families? I'm glad you quoted the racist statements by news columnists of the time. It puts the lie to those who today claim we were only doing it for the safety of the internees. It was also informative to learn that the California Farm Bureau was also behind this infamous chapter in American history.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 27, 2007 | Cecilia Rasmussen, Times Staff Writer
Manzanar, Calif., May 1942. It's a warm morning at the dusty, inhospitable World War II internment camp on the bleak edge of the Owens Valley. Latino teenager Ralph Lazo arrives by bus to join his Japanese American friends from Belmont High School. Lazo, a 16-year-old Mexican-Irish American, was motivated by loyalty and outrage at the internment of his friends. He became the only known non-spouse, non-Japanese who voluntarily relocated to Manzanar.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 27, 2007 | Cecilia Rasmussen, Times Staff Writer
Manzanar, Calif., May 1942. It's a warm morning at the dusty, inhospitable World War II internment camp on the bleak edge of the Owens Valley. Latino teenager Ralph Lazo arrives by bus to join his Japanese American friends from Belmont High School. Lazo, a 16-year-old Mexican-Irish American, was motivated by loyalty and outrage at the internment of his friends. He became the only known non-spouse, non-Japanese who voluntarily relocated to Manzanar.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 1998
Thanks for the April 5 article about Ralph Lazo, who chose to join his Japanese friends when they were interned at Manzanar. I look at the class picture and wonder how many of those shown fought and died for the country that interned their families? I'm glad you quoted the racist statements by news columnists of the time. It puts the lie to those who today claim we were only doing it for the safety of the internees. It was also informative to learn that the California Farm Bureau was also behind this infamous chapter in American history.
TRAVEL
January 6, 1985
Enjoyed Sharon Dirlam's Dec. 9 article on the Barranca del Cobre, Mexico. She did a great job. I am well familiar with that area and through the Los Angeles Community College District Community Services I will be leading a group to the Barranca next spring. It's a very thorough trip that includes Chihuahua City, Creel, Cusarare, Overlook of the Urique, Arareko Lake and Monk's Clipp. If anyone is interested they can contact the college district at 617 West 7th St., Los Angeles 90017, phone (213)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 1998 | Cecilia Rasmussen
In a unique, powerful and now forgotten protest of one of America's worst social injustices, Ralph Lazo, a Latino teenager, joined his Japanese American friends from Bunker Hill when they were interned during World War II. When his friends and their families were ordered to Manzanar, an internment camp in the desert, Lazo followed them. He was the only non-Japanese in any of the internment camps.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 1986
Community Colleges are what the name represents: many things to many people. They provide an opportunity for a working person to update the basic skills needed on the job. Occupational programs allow a relatively short time to prepare for a job skill or craft. A few examples are registered nurse, computer maintenance, culinary arts, machine shop and many other preparation opportunities. The university academic-bound student can complete the first two years of a bachelor's degree.
NEWS
October 7, 2004 | Kevin Thomas, Times Staff Writer
After a long European sojourn, Jon Jost, master American independent filmmaker, will personally present the U.S. premiere of his "Oui Non" (1997-2002) at the Egyptian on Sunday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 8, 1992 | MAYERENE BARKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Japanese-Americans interned at Manzanar Relocation Center during World War II paid their final respects Tuesday to a long-time friend: Ralph Lazo, the only non-Japanese interned at the camp, who died on New Year's Day. "He was my friend for 50 years," said Mary Kinoshito of Sun Valley, who gathered with about 50 of Lazo's family members, friends and former co-workers at a graveside service in heavy rain Tuesday at Glen Haven Memorial Park in Kagel Canyon. "I was his neighbor at Manzanar."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 2010 | By Reed Johnson, Los Angeles Times
Richard Montoya says he's "obsessed with the night" and the history-making players that go bump in it. Fugitive slaves on the Underground Railroad . Mexican immigrants wading across the Rio Grande. Radical labor organizers and hard-line Arizona sheriffs. Lewis and Clark and Jackie Robinson, Sacagawea and Joan Baez, Fidel Castro and Malcolm X. While a few of these nocturnal convergences are historical facts, others are simply dramatic metaphors and theatrical phantasms.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 21, 2004 | Myrna Oliver, Times Staff Writer
Harry Ueno, who stood up to corrupt officials during the internment of Japanese Americans at Manzanar during World War II, has died. He was 97. Ueno, a produce worker and cherry and strawberry farmer, died of pneumonia Dec. 14 in Mountain View, Calif. The Hawaiian-born orchardist was considered a hero among the 110,000 U.S. residents of Japanese descent who were interned following Japan's bombing of Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7, 1941.
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