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Ralph Leighton

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April 9, 1989
When Richard P. Feynman, the late, world-renowned physicist with a passion for puzzle-solving and for making mischief, received the call at 4 in the morning telling him that he had won the 1965 Nobel Prize for physics, his reaction was to say, "Yeah, but I'm sleeping !" By the fifth or sixth call he told the reporter from Time magazine, "I don't know how to get out of this thing. Maybe I won't accept the prize." But the combustible curmudgeon eventually relented. In "Surely You're Joking," Feynman tells stories of his childhood in Far Rockaway, of his studies at MIT and Princeton, of his experience on the Manhattan Project in Los Alamos, of his work as professor at Cornell and Caltech and of his research in theoretical physics.
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November 13, 1988 | Bettyann Kevles, Kevles writes about science for The Times
The announcement of Richard Feynman's death in February startled many of us who had known the Nobel Laureate at Caltech, even as we acknowledged that the cancer that killed him could not be fended off indefinitely. He called himself "a curious character." Certainly he achieved that status: self-created eccentric, would-be 20th-Century Leonardo, all-around genius with the added fillip of a sense of humor. He was a great physicist who looked on nature afresh each day.
NEWS
April 22, 1992 | JIM WASHBURN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Bowers Museum director Peter Keller may have his museum booked until 1995, having traveled to China and other far climes to oversee every detail of his scheduled exhibits, but I'll bet he doesn't know he's going to have a yurt full of Tuvans on his lawn.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 1987
That's the spirit, Ronald! Keep sending Supreme Court nominees "just as objectionable" to the "liberal" majority as Bork was--all the way until January, 1989! RALPH LEIGHTON Sierra Madre
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 4, 1986
The governor of Georgia has asked the people of his state to pray for rain, showing that freakish weather is still being interpreted as the act of a god capable of punishing man by causing crops to wither and livestock to die. Fundamentalists, face up to it: God singled out the Bible-Belt South for punishment this time because of your attacks against his favorite magazines! RALPH LEIGHTON Glendale
NEWS
April 22, 1992 | JIM WASHBURN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Bowers Museum director Peter Keller may have his museum booked until 1995, having traveled to China and other far climes to oversee every detail of his scheduled exhibits, but I'll bet he doesn't know he's going to have a yurt full of Tuvans on his lawn.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 2, 1987
I think I've got it straight: The U.S. is in the Persian Gulf because: 1. Iraq attacked our ship. 2. Kuwait needs to send oil to Japan. 3. Texaco needs to get oil from Iran. Now, tell me again how World War I started. RALPH LEIGHTON Sierra Madre
BOOKS
April 9, 1989
When Richard P. Feynman, the late, world-renowned physicist with a passion for puzzle-solving and for making mischief, received the call at 4 in the morning telling him that he had won the 1965 Nobel Prize for physics, his reaction was to say, "Yeah, but I'm sleeping !" By the fifth or sixth call he told the reporter from Time magazine, "I don't know how to get out of this thing. Maybe I won't accept the prize." But the combustible curmudgeon eventually relented. In "Surely You're Joking," Feynman tells stories of his childhood in Far Rockaway, of his studies at MIT and Princeton, of his experience on the Manhattan Project in Los Alamos, of his work as professor at Cornell and Caltech and of his research in theoretical physics.
BOOKS
November 13, 1988 | Bettyann Kevles, Kevles writes about science for The Times
The announcement of Richard Feynman's death in February startled many of us who had known the Nobel Laureate at Caltech, even as we acknowledged that the cancer that killed him could not be fended off indefinitely. He called himself "a curious character." Certainly he achieved that status: self-created eccentric, would-be 20th-Century Leonardo, all-around genius with the added fillip of a sense of humor. He was a great physicist who looked on nature afresh each day.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 1987
That's the spirit, Ronald! Keep sending Supreme Court nominees "just as objectionable" to the "liberal" majority as Bork was--all the way until January, 1989! RALPH LEIGHTON Sierra Madre
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 4, 1986
The governor of Georgia has asked the people of his state to pray for rain, showing that freakish weather is still being interpreted as the act of a god capable of punishing man by causing crops to wither and livestock to die. Fundamentalists, face up to it: God singled out the Bible-Belt South for punishment this time because of your attacks against his favorite magazines! RALPH LEIGHTON Glendale
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 18, 1994
In response to "Harding to Compete in Olympics, Drop Lawsuit," Feb. 13: Here's the deal. The U.S. Olympic Committee decided to let Tonya Harding skate so that the media could turn their focus and attention on all of the Olympic athletes and the "true" spirit of the games. Next, the International Olympic Committee says Harding and Nancy Kerrigan get no special treatment and will have to skate together in practices and share the same living area. Now, the first time Kerrigan and Harding are on the ice together, security has been quadrupled.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 1993 | BOB POOL
Three Russian singing cowboys who rode in last week's Rose Parade to the sound of a high school band plan to march to their own beat back to Pasadena today. Singing horsemen from the remote Russian area of Tuva--who were unexpectedly drowned out by a band marching behind them on New Year's Day--will stage free concerts at noon and 7:30 p.m. at Caltech. Tuvans are known for their unusual yodeling--their ability to sing two notes at once.
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