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Ralph M Brown Act

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 6, 2004 | Sue Fox and Jack Leonard, Times Staff Writers
Los Angeles County Dist. Atty. Steve Cooley concluded Friday that the Board of Supervisors broke the law by deciding in secret to close the trauma center at Martin Luther King Jr./Drew Medical Center. The supervisors forged a plan to close the trauma center, viewed as a last-ditch effort to relieve pressure on the troubled hospital, during two meetings that were closed to the public Sept. 7 and 13.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 2012 | By Jason Song, Los Angeles Times
During a closed-door session with Los Angeles County supervisors last fall, California Gov. Jerry Brown made a comment acknowledging that there would be questions about whether the group was violating the law. According to a transcript obtained by The Times, the governor said at one point during the meeting, "Let's get our Brown Act cover story. " He was referring to the state's open-meetings law, the Ralph M. Brown Act. Moments later, then-County Counsel Andrea Sheridan Ordin noted that reporters who questioned the legality of the meeting - which indeed was later ruled illegal - were waiting outside.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 1999 | Jenifer Ragland, (949) 574-4207
The South Orange County Community College District Board of Trustees voted unanimously last week to challenge part of a lawsuit filed by Irvine Valley College professor Roy Bauer. Bauer has alleged that the board violated the Ralph M. Brown Act on eight counts relating to the district's 1997 reorganization of administrators. A court ruling was in favor of the district on all but two counts, both of which involved the hiring of Irvine Valley President Raghu Mathur.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 14, 2007 | Susannah Rosenblatt, Times Staff Writer
Los Angeles County supervisors acknowledged Tuesday that they had discussed plans for the embattled Martin Luther King Jr.-Harbor Hospital in closed-door sessions, in what a good-government expert called a violation of the state's open-meeting law. The discussion, which the county's top lawyer defended, is the latest example of questions arising over the supervisors' handling of meetings about the Willowbrook hospital.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 16, 2000 | Sean Kirwan, (949) 574-4202
The city will pay more than $55,000 in lawyers fees it accrued defending three council members from a lawsuit that accused them of violating California's open meeting laws. The law firm of Richards, Watson and Gerchan billed the city $55,384 for services performed in relation to the lawsuit between July 1999 and June 2000. The suit, which was filed last August by three city residents, accused Mayor Sherri M.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 5, 2000 | Tariq Malik, (714) 520-2503
The City Council on Monday made a formal commitment to hold all future meetings concerning applicant interviews for council vacancies in the public eye. The action was taken after the California First Amendment Coalition claimed the council violated the Ralph M. Brown Act governing public meetings when officials interviewed candidates for a vacant council seat behind closed doors on Jan. 22.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 1995 | VIVIEN LOU CHEN
A North Hollywood man has filed a lawsuit against Burbank Airport officials, claiming they violated state law by holding a closed-door meeting in December to discuss an issue not on the public agenda. Airport officials expect to hire a lawyer who will handle the case and formally respond to the eight-page complaint before the end of the month, Airport Commissioner Robert Garcin said Friday. R.C.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 2004 | From a Times Staff Writer
The California Supreme Court on Wednesday rejected Los Angeles County's appeal in a case involving illegal closed-door meetings of the Board of Supervisors. In October, a state appellate court ruled in a lawsuit brought by The Times that the board and its attorney had violated the Ralph M. Brown Act, the state's open meeting law, during a series of closed meetings in 2001. The county was ordered to pay the newspaper's legal fees, which exceed $100,000.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 27, 2003 | From a Times Staff Writer
Los Angeles County plans to appeal a court ruling that the Board of Supervisors and its attorney violated the state's open meeting law, the Ralph M. Brown Act. The supervisors voted in closed session Tuesday to appeal the state appellate court's Oct. 29 decision, but their lawyers did not immediately disclose the vote -- also a violation of the Brown Act.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 29, 2004 | Sue Fox, Times Staff Writer
Under fire for allegedly breaking California's open-meeting law, the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors agreed late Tuesday to give the district attorney records from two closed meetings on the proposed closure of Martin Luther King Jr./Drew Medical Center's trauma unit. According to participants in the meetings on Sept. 7 and 13, the supervisors agreed to a plan by county health department director Thomas Garthwaite to close the trauma center to relieve stress on the troubled hospital.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 14, 2007 | Seema Mehta, Times Staff Writer
A southern Orange County school district has settled a lawsuit that alleged its trustees violated the state's open-meetings law by gathering behind closed doors to discuss ways to silence a critic.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 29, 2005 | Jack Leonard, Times Staff Writer
A judge has ruled that the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors did not break the state's open-meeting law when it decided behind closed doors last year to shut the trauma unit at Martin Luther King Jr./Drew Medical Center. The finding contradicts an earlier one by Los Angeles County Dist. Atty. Steve Cooley that supervisors violated the Ralph M. Brown Act when they came to a consensus to suspend trauma services after two closed-session meetings and without a formal vote.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 6, 2004 | Sue Fox and Jack Leonard, Times Staff Writers
Los Angeles County Dist. Atty. Steve Cooley concluded Friday that the Board of Supervisors broke the law by deciding in secret to close the trauma center at Martin Luther King Jr./Drew Medical Center. The supervisors forged a plan to close the trauma center, viewed as a last-ditch effort to relieve pressure on the troubled hospital, during two meetings that were closed to the public Sept. 7 and 13.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 29, 2004 | Sue Fox, Times Staff Writer
Under fire for allegedly breaking California's open-meeting law, the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors agreed late Tuesday to give the district attorney records from two closed meetings on the proposed closure of Martin Luther King Jr./Drew Medical Center's trauma unit. According to participants in the meetings on Sept. 7 and 13, the supervisors agreed to a plan by county health department director Thomas Garthwaite to close the trauma center to relieve stress on the troubled hospital.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 2004 | Joel Rubin, Times Staff Writer
Beleaguered Westminster School District trustees have violated state law by voting, without appropriate public discussion, to mail a letter districtwide defending their stance on a state antidiscrimination law, the Orange County district attorney's office has warned. Prosecutors said they would drop the matter if the trustees reconsidered their decision to mail the letter to district employees and parents and first allowed public debate.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 2004 | From a Times Staff Writer
The California Supreme Court on Wednesday rejected Los Angeles County's appeal in a case involving illegal closed-door meetings of the Board of Supervisors. In October, a state appellate court ruled in a lawsuit brought by The Times that the board and its attorney had violated the Ralph M. Brown Act, the state's open meeting law, during a series of closed meetings in 2001. The county was ordered to pay the newspaper's legal fees, which exceed $100,000.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 1997
Few things have had greater beneficial impact on government bodies than shedding some light on their actions, although the agencies themselves have often fought the glare of the public eye. The Ralph M. Brown Act, named for the speaker of the state Assembly in the 1959-60 session, over the years has established the right of the public to have advance notice of meetings of local government bodies, open hearings and other access.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 19, 1991 | SHANNON SANDS
The district attorney's office is investigating a complaint that the City Council may have violated the state's open meeting law in hiring a lawyer to defend three council members sued over the wording of ballot arguments. "Right now, we have investigators in the field interviewing some citizens who have complained," Deputy Dist. Atty. Gregory J. Robischon said Tuesday. "We don't know how long the investigation will take." The possibility that the City Council might have violated the Ralph M.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 27, 2003 | From a Times Staff Writer
Los Angeles County plans to appeal a court ruling that the Board of Supervisors and its attorney violated the state's open meeting law, the Ralph M. Brown Act. The supervisors voted in closed session Tuesday to appeal the state appellate court's Oct. 29 decision, but their lawyers did not immediately disclose the vote -- also a violation of the Brown Act.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 26, 2003 | Sue Fox, Times Staff Writer
The Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors sparked an outcry from free-speech advocates Tuesday when it moved to muzzle a persistent gadfly who frequently criticizes board actions. At the center of the dispute is Merritt Holloway, a 49-year-old tailor from South Los Angeles. Every week, Holloway plants himself before the board's public microphone to denounce what he views as the waste and corruption saturating the county.
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