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Ralph M Brown Act

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 2003 | Nicholas Riccardi, Times Staff Writer
The Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors and its attorney violated the state's open meeting law, then tried to conceal its violation from the public, a state appellate court has ruled. The Oct. 29 ruling by a three-judge panel is the final chapter in a long-running dispute that involved an effort by county supervisors to secretly defeat a ballot initiative.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 1992
The Legislature is back in session, at Gov. Pete Wilson's request, to address the unfinished business of workers' compensation reform. While there, lawmakers should take care of yet another important item--overriding Wilson's veto last week of a bill expanding the Brown Act. The 39-year-old Ralph M.
NEWS
June 5, 1992 | CARL INGRAM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A bill aimed at increasing the public's right to know what their city councils, school boards and county supervisors are up to was narrowly passed by the Senate and sent to the Assembly on Thursday. The bill, opposed by a variety of cities, water agencies, school districts and the Wilson Administration's Department of Finance, won approval on a 22-7 vote, one more than the simple majority required. Its fate in the Assembly is uncertain. Carried by Sen. Quentin L.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 1992 | JOHN CHANDLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Board members of the Antelope Valley Union High School District appear to have violated state law by holding a two-hour private meeting last week with Los Angeles County officials to develop a bailout plan for the financially troubled district, attorneys said Thursday. District officials have insisted that they were entitled to meet privately. But they have given varying and, sometimes conflicting, legal justifications for the closed session.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 29, 2005 | Jack Leonard, Times Staff Writer
A judge has ruled that the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors did not break the state's open-meeting law when it decided behind closed doors last year to shut the trauma unit at Martin Luther King Jr./Drew Medical Center. The finding contradicts an earlier one by Los Angeles County Dist. Atty. Steve Cooley that supervisors violated the Ralph M. Brown Act when they came to a consensus to suspend trauma services after two closed-session meetings and without a formal vote.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 2004 | Joel Rubin, Times Staff Writer
Beleaguered Westminster School District trustees have violated state law by voting, without appropriate public discussion, to mail a letter districtwide defending their stance on a state antidiscrimination law, the Orange County district attorney's office has warned. Prosecutors said they would drop the matter if the trustees reconsidered their decision to mail the letter to district employees and parents and first allowed public debate.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 1993 | GARY GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Oxnard officials no longer appear to be violating the state's open-meetings law, Ventura County Dist. Atty. Michael D. Bradbury said Thursday. Bradbury, who two years ago called on Oxnard residents to vote the City Council out of office for holding what he called illegal secret meetings, said Thursday he has received no complaints about the city for at least a year. "I certainly hope they've finally gotten the message," Bradbury said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 12, 1991 | FREDERICK M. MUIR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Los Angeles City Council voted in a closed session this week to deny the district attorney access to tape recordings of its private meetings, which are being sought in an investigation of possible criminal misconduct by city police commissioners, The Times has learned. The District Attorney's Special Investigations Division, which prosecutes criminal wrongdoing by public officials, has requested recordings of meetings between the council and former Police Commissioner Dan Garcia.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 7, 1991 | SHANNON SANDS
The district attorney's office has received a complaint that the City Council may have violated the state's open-meeting law in hiring an attorney to represent three council members sued over the wording of ballot arguments for Tuesday's election. Concerns that the City Council might have violated the Ralph M. Brown Act--intended to keep governmental bodies from acting secretly--have been raised at the past two council meetings.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 7, 1987 | TED VOLLMER, Times Staff Writer
A handful of gadflies, capitalizing on a change in state law that took effect this year, has waited countless hours each week to lecture the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors on topics ranging from the dangers of hypoglycemia to the perils of homosexuality and the pitfalls of public works projects.
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