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Ralph M Brown Act

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 2012 | By Jason Song, Los Angeles Times
During a closed-door session with Los Angeles County supervisors last fall, California Gov. Jerry Brown made a comment acknowledging that there would be questions about whether the group was violating the law. According to a transcript obtained by The Times, the governor said at one point during the meeting, "Let's get our Brown Act cover story. " He was referring to the state's open-meetings law, the Ralph M. Brown Act. Moments later, then-County Counsel Andrea Sheridan Ordin noted that reporters who questioned the legality of the meeting - which indeed was later ruled illegal - were waiting outside.
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NEWS
March 29, 1994 | CARL INGRAM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Legislature has sent Gov. Pete Wilson the last of several bills requiring local elected officials to conduct their business more openly--not, for example, at out-of-town "retreats" or in small, private gatherings. Wilson is expected to sign the so-called sunshine legislation quickly so that it will become law by Friday, the effective date of a three-bill package passed by the Legislature and signed by the governor last year. Together the four bills represent one of the few substantial tightenings of the 40-year-old Ralph M. Brown Act anti-secrecy law, which requires local elected officials of public agencies and school boards to meet and make decisions in public.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 1992 | JOHN SCHWADA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles city planning officials suspended a recent action concerning the Warner Center Specific Plan because homeowners complained that they were kept in the dark about the meeting at which the decision was made, contending that the state's open meeting law had been violated.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 26, 2003 | Sue Fox, Times Staff Writer
The Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors sparked an outcry from free-speech advocates Tuesday when it moved to muzzle a persistent gadfly who frequently criticizes board actions. At the center of the dispute is Merritt Holloway, a 49-year-old tailor from South Los Angeles. Every week, Holloway plants himself before the board's public microphone to denounce what he views as the waste and corruption saturating the county.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 14, 2007 | Susannah Rosenblatt, Times Staff Writer
Los Angeles County supervisors acknowledged Tuesday that they had discussed plans for the embattled Martin Luther King Jr.-Harbor Hospital in closed-door sessions, in what a good-government expert called a violation of the state's open-meeting law. The discussion, which the county's top lawyer defended, is the latest example of questions arising over the supervisors' handling of meetings about the Willowbrook hospital.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 1992 | BILL BOYARSKY
An honest person has nothing to hide. That simple precept nags at me whenever I stand in the hallway of a government building, waiting until elected officials finish conducting their business behind closed doors. When the meeting ends, often hours later, I join the other reporters scurrying around trying to find out what happened. Usually, the conspiracy of silence holds. These public servants are as tight-lipped as mob bosses. What, I wonder, do they have to hide? Often, it's plenty.
NEWS
October 2, 1992 | DANIEL M. WEINTRAUB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gov. Pete Wilson has vetoed legislation that would have allowed local governments to distribute clean needles to drug users as part of comprehensive efforts to stop the spread of the deadly AIDS virus, his office announced Thursday. Wilson, completing action on hundreds of bills sent to his desk at the end of the legislative session, also rejected two measures that would have expanded the state's open-meeting law.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 3, 1991 | SANTIAGO O'DONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ventura County Dist. Atty. Michael D. Bradbury, frustrated by a series of alleged violations of the state's open meeting law by the Oxnard City Council, Thursday called on city residents to vote the council out of office. "The public should be outraged that elected officials are not willing to abide by the law," he told The Times. "If they want city business to continue to be conducted behind closed doors they should preserve the status quo.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 13, 1998 | TED ROHRLICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Many local government officials routinely break the California law that requires them to conduct the public's business in public, a veteran city attorney has asserted in remarks that support suspicions long held by outsiders that the law often is not followed. James L.
NEWS
July 16, 1987 | MYRNA OLIVER, Times Legal Affairs Writer
In the summer of 1985, the Los Angeles City Council quietly approved "Item 53" without public posting, discussion or prior reading. An irate citizen filed a civil suit, claiming that council members had surreptitiously given themselves a 10% pay raise in violation of the Brown Act and the City Charter. A judge nullified the raise as beyond the Charter limit of 5%. A year later, the San Diego City Council was accused of meeting secretly to discuss its $644-million budget.
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