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Ralph M Brown Act

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 16, 2001 | JENNIFER MENA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Orange County district attorney's office is looking into whether Costa Mesa officials violated a state open-meeting law during discussions this year about the proposed Home Ranch development. The agency is studying complaints by a Costa Mesa resident that the city violated the Brown Act when two members of the City Council and two members of the Planning Commission, city staff and representatives of developer C.J. Segerstrom & Sons met without providing notice to the public, Deputy Dist.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 25, 1999 | RICHARD WINTON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Amid piles of papers and backbreaking books in his La Verne home, chemistry instructor Richard McKee sits in his oak chair, trying to unlock secrets. Not the secrets of hydrocarbons or nucleotides--but the secrets of Claremont City Hall. This time, McKee is scouring his notes to figure out how to force the city to divulge a settlement of a recent federal court lawsuit. Last time, his cause was outing the private deliberations of his own colleagues at Pasadena City College.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 17, 2003 | Jenifer Ragland, Times Staff Writer
A Ventura County district attorney's investigation of the Rio School District's Board of Trustees revealed "a disturbing number" of open-meeting law violations in recent months, but prosecutors said they will give school officials a chance to correct the pattern of mistakes before taking any action. The inquiry was prompted by complaints lodged after a sharply divided board abruptly suspended Supt. Yolanda Benitez at its March 5 meeting pending an investigation of the administrator.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 22, 2000
A lawsuit accuses the Los Angeles Board of Education of violating the Brown Act by privately authorizing Supt. Roy Romer to explore the possibility of opening the Belmont Learning Center or selling the property. The suit, filed Wednesday in Los Angeles County Superior Court by Hotel Employees and Restaurant Employees union Local 11, asks that the board's action be overturned. The union is seeking representation at the New Otani Hotel, which is owned by Kajima International.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 30, 1997
Pasadena activists said Tuesday that they were considering a lawsuit against the city to forestall the extension of the controversial city manager's contract. The Pasadena City Council extended City Manager Phil Hawkey's contract by two years in a closed-door meeting April 8. After an uproar from activists and union leaders that the vote violated the Brown Act requiring open meetings, the council revisited the matter during its meeting Monday night.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 1997
The Pasadena City Council will decide Monday in open session whether to extend the city manager's contract for two years after local union leaders questioned whether a yes vote on the issue taken two weeks ago behind closed doors may have violated the state's open meeting law.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 4, 1995 | LESLEY WRIGHT
The personnel director of Orange Unified School District is contesting the district trustees' decision not to renew his contract, alleging the decision was made illegally. N. Jack Elsner, one year from retirement after 28 years with the district, was notified March 14 that his contract would be terminated June 30, according to a letter to the school district from Elsner's lawyer, George W. Shaeffer Jr.
BUSINESS
April 7, 1995 | Times Wire Services
A major consumer group has accused California regulators of violating the state's open-meeting laws by deliberating in secret on plans to open electricity markets to competition. Members of the California Public Utilities Commission denied the charges, which were made this week in a letter and public comment from Audrie Krause, executive director of Toward Utility Rate Normalization, at the commission's biweekly meeting.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 1992
Lancaster officials, faced with allegations that the City Council has been violating the state's open meeting law, promised Wednesday that the council will make future real estate decisions in public and reveal the prices paid. The decision came after The Times reported Saturday that the council voted behind closed doors last month to authorize purchase of downtown area properties and did not reveal what it planned to pay.
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